Posts Tagged ‘ontario landlord’

Ontario Landlord Forum – Get Expert Advice To Help You Succeed in 2019

Monday, December 24th, 2018

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The Forum That Changed The Industry Is Back Better Than Ever!  As Landlords Face Huge Challenges Experienced and Successful Landlords & Property Managers Are Here To Help You!

-Network With 1000s of Successful Ontario Landlords & Expert Property Managers

-Ask Questions On A Problem and Get Some Guidance From Pro Landlords

-Chat With Landlords Who Are Multi-Millionaires due to investing in Ontario rentals

-Chat With Real Landlords, Avoid Paying $1000’s to “landlord reps” Who Charge You With No Guarantees

It wasn’t that long ago the serious concerns of small landlords went unheard. There was no voice for small landlords. Nothing. No one cared about our concerns.

Before the Ontario Landlords Association government and media ignored us. In the view of the general public we were simply “invisible.”

No one even discussed the problems with the Ontario Residential Tenancies Act until the OLA started shouting loud and strong.

Not Long Ago Nobody Even Thought About Ontario Landlords

Sure there were rare media stories about the large, multi-million dollar corporate landlords. These are those large wealthy REITS full of international investors and selling stocks.

There were almost no stories about bad tenants or how the rules were unfair for small landlords.

Large Corporate Landlords Never Helped Small Landlords

They employ property managers and expensive lawyers to help them out when they have a tenant issue. And with large buildings having some bad tenants really never hurt the bottom line due to the economies of scale.

It Used To Be Open Season on Small Landlords Working Hard For Our Financial Futures

Not only where the concerns of small landlords ignored it was just about impossible to get any quality help when you had a tenant problem.  Even some so called “legal pros” were charging thousands of dollars for simple issues.

And when they didn’t deliver what they promised (and what you paid for) they would say tell you to get lost and even threaten to sue you.

There were all sorts of questions from landlords in trouble but no where to go for help. Sure you could pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars to some company out there who would fill out an LTB form for you (something you could do yourself for free).

They were happy to charge you lots of money, but never guaranteed you any success and threatened to sue you if you told the truth about their horrible service.

Due To Overwhelming Requests and Huge New Challenges We Face Ontario Landlord Forum Is Back for a Low One Time Registration Fee

The forum that has helped thousands of landlords succeed and deal with tenant problems is back…and all for a one-time fee. 

We also have added some amazing services that experienced and successful landlords have recommended so you are ready to face bad tenants out there (and make sure you find all the good tenants looking for good landlords with great rentals).

This is a forum with real landlords and even some tenants looking for advice. All our members are verified.

We Are On Your Side! And Want To Help You Succeed!

Join our huge Ontario landlord community to make sure your rental business succeeds and makes profits. We are real landlords who have seen just about every issue out there.

Become an Ontario Landlords Association Member And Get Access To The Forum That Changed Lives…And Can Help You Succeed As An Ontario Landlord!

“Ontario may just have the strictest legal requirements for landlords in North America.”

Sunday, July 18th, 2010

Being a Landlord in Ontario

I received in the mail yesterday my real estate broker’s regular newsletter.  In it there is an article entitled “Becoming a Landlord – Do Your Homework”.  The first sentence of the article is “Ontario may just have the strictest legal requirements for landlords in North America.”

In my opinion, the article ought to be re-titled “Becoming a Landlord – Have Your Head Examined.”  I don’t know if it’s fair to say that Ontario has the strictest landlord laws, but I think it is very fair to say that the Landlord and Tenant Act is extremely tenant-friendly.  My criticism is NOT with the existence of the LTA’s terms, rather it is with the inflexibility of the system.  I will be the first to recognize that the legislation was put in place in response to actual examples of what slum-lords have done to tenants.  I will also be the first to recognized that even with this legislation in place there are still slum-lords operating in Toronto and throughout the province (thankfully, none of them are my clients).  I should also say that in the past I have represented both landlords and tenants in various matters and I do not have a bias in favour of one or the other.  The difficulty is that the legislation which was enacted to avoid the abuses by landlords years ago swung the pendulum way over to the other side and now permits abuses by tenants.  There is no fair balance.  Some will say, “yes, that’s true, but it’s a policy decision made by the legislature that it is entitled to make.”  I agree.  But that doesn’t make it right and it is ultimately, then, a choice between two evils.

I should also point out that I am dealing with residential tenancies here, not commercial tenancies.  So, this will affect small businesses, for example, where they purchase a building that has a main floor store front or office space and then an apartment or apartments in the floor(s) above.

The Ontario legislature’s desire to protect tenants from slum-lords the legislation has turned into a nightmare for decent landlords to get rid of problem tenants.  Let’s give a few examples.  The first area is rent.  If the tenant fails to pay rent on January 1, the landlord must give a notice, if the notice is ignored, the landlord can bring an application to the Landlord and Tenant Board to have the tenancy terminated for non-payment of rent.  The Board hearing might not be scheduled until April 1.  At any point up until the start of the hearing, the tenant can pay the rent – and remember, we are only talking about January’s rent.  If the tenant has failed to pay February and March rent by that time, a new application (or applications) must be filed.  So, if a tenant wanted to be perpetually late, the landlord has to bring a series of applications and if the tenant pays at the last second, the landlord is precluded from kicking the tenant out.  The legislation was put in place to avoid slum-lords from using the slightest delay in rental payment as an excuse to kick out a rent-controlled tenant and replace him or her with a higher paying tenant.  The problem is that it is now open to abuse by tenants.

Another example, I have a client who is a superintendant at an apartment building.  The client has a dispute with one of the tenants.  One day, my client alleges and I personally believe him but it has never been fully decided at the LTB or in court, the tenant decided to throw a 4 litre bottle of oil off the tenant’s balcony and narrowly missed my client working many stories below.  This type of conduct is completely reprehensible and ought to be a justification for immediate eviction of the tenant.  An application for this relief was brought to the tribunal.  The application was dismissed.  Why?  Because it was not a “continuing” event.  The provision in the legislation was clearly aimed at situations such as tenants who play their music loudly or have parties all the time.  The result is that the tenant would have to keep doing acts which endangered my client’s health or amounted to a nuisance for an uninterrupted period of seven days before the tenant could be evicted.  Perversely enough, if the tenant does whatever the problem is for six days in a row, then takes a day off, and then goes another six days, then takes another day off, etc., etc. there is little that a landlord can do.  Again, a provision in the legislation that is open for abuse by tenants.

A third example, in the most recent round of legislative reform landlords were precluded from being able to request that tenants permit the landlords to directly debit the tenants’ bank accounts for the rental payments.  This is joined with the existing provision that landlords cannot ask for post-dated cheques.  The only guaranteed obligation of a tenant, regardless of the nature of the tenancy, is that the tenant pays rent.  Direct debits permit the landlord to more cost-effectively get paid.  The argument against direct debits is that sometimes the tenant doesn’t have the money on the first.  If that’s the case then (a) the tenant is in breach of the lease and that’s the tenant’s problem; and (b) if the tenant writes a cheque on January 1 hoping that it will be deposited on January 2 at the landlord’s bank and that by the time it makes it over to the tenant’s bank on January 3 there will be money to cover the cheque, the tenant is engaged in “cheque kiting” which is illegal – and something the law should not be encouraging.

I could go on.  Suffice it to say, over the years I have had opportunities with friends and otherwise to invest in real estate which would make me a landlord, either directly or indirectly.  In light of Ontario’s legislation, I have steadfastly refused.  Those who are landlords are either braver souls than I, or maybe they should have their heads examined.

courtesy of Christoper A.L. Caruana