Posts Tagged ‘N4’

Ontario Landlords Association Partnership With The Toronto Rent Bank To Help Good Tenants And Great Landlords In 2020

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020

Ontario Landlords Association Is All About Helping Good Landlords, Good Tenants & Improving The Ontario Rental Industry – Spread The News About This Helpful Program For Tenants and Landlords

Small landlords are different than large corporate landlords in many ways.  In fact, we’ve told the Ministry of Housing that we should have different rules for small landlords versus large corporate landlords.

Many small residential landlords were once tenants ourselves. Whether it was while we were studying in college or university, when we moved out to find our first job, or when we started families and were saving up for a deposit to buy our own homes.

As people who rented ourselves, we know what tenants are looking for in finding a good rental home and a great landlord. We also know how “life happens” and no matter who you are circumstances can come up leading to job losses, illnesses, family struggles and not being able to pay rent.

Ontario Landlords Association Partners With Neighbourhood Informational Post (NIP) And Promotes The Toronto Rent Bank

The Ontario Landlords Association is happy to partner with NIP.  NIP is a non-for-profit organization funded by the government to support and help develop the local community, and  hold multiple programs that supports the individuals and households with low income.

Toronto Rent Bank

One of the programs offered by NIP is the Toronto Rent Bank.

Toronto Rent Bank is an interest free loan that helps individuals and or household with low income to pay their rent and avoid eviction due to short-term financial difficulties.

NIP found that the demand for this program is raising over the years, however, the application we receive has been decreasing.

They assume this to be related to the limited number of people they are currently exposed to, therefore they want to seek if related organizations are willing to support them and expand this service to support more people.

More About NIP And the Toronto Rent Bank

In 1969, a group of community residents founded Neighbourhood Information Post because they wanted to ensure that low-income individuals and households had access to information and resources, so that they could be empowered to improve the quality of their own lives.

Four decades later, from helping local community members and newcomers access resources, supporting the development of community leaders and volunteers, to providing financial assistance and housing support to people throughout the City of Toronto, NIP remains a vital agency in the eastern downtown core in Toronto.

TORONTO RENT BANK PROGRAM

The Toronto Rent Bank Program provides interest-free repayable loans to low-income households facing eviction due to short-term financial difficulties.  It is a successful collaboration between Neighbourhood Information Post (NIP) and our partner agencies:  Albion Neighbourhood ServicesCOSTI North York Housing HelpEast York Housing Help, The Housing Help Centre, The Neighbourhood Organization, Unison Health and Community Services.

NIP acts as the Central Administrative agency as well as a local service access centre in this city-wide homelessness prevention program.  NIP is responsible for processing all Rent Bank loans and repayments in Toronto, as well as providing local residents in the Downtown area with Rent Bank intake functions and a variety of housing-related services.

Tenants may be eligible if:

  • you are living in Toronto with legal status in Canada

  • you have steady and ongoing source of income (within low-income guidelines)

  • you currently receive income through social assistance (OW / ODSP) or OSAP plus additional income; special rules apply* (*Please contact your local office for more information)

  • your rental unit is covered by provincial tenant legislation (RTA) and you are paying market rent

  • you can provide documentation required by the Rent Bank application process and satisfy all other program requirements

Landlords Can Benefit From This Program Too!

No small landlord wants to evict a good tenant who is having temporary financial troubles.  The problem is most small landlords are also struggling!

We need rent or we can’t cover our mortgage and won’t be able to continue to be a landlord. We aren’t huge corporate landlords with economies of scale and private legal teams.

Landlords can let our tenants know about the Rent Bank Program and help them succeed to help you succeed.

TORONTO RENT BANK CENTRAL OFFICE

Contact Information: 416-924-2543 or torontorentbank@nipost.org

YOU *DO NOT* HAVE TO PAY RENT ON THE 1st IN ONTARIO (You Have A 2 Week Legal Cushion, And Months More)

Sunday, December 8th, 2019

In These Difficult Economic Times With Precarious Employment and Lay Offs Many Good Tenants Can’t Pay the Rent On Time…But You Can’t Be Kicked Out!

“No baby, we won’t be homeless as Mummy looks for a new job”

We live in difficult times.  Good landlords are aware of this and will support this post as it’s just an informative way your tenants can keep renting your over-priced property and making you rich for doing no real labour.

Landlords need to remember that while you do no work to take our money, tenants must struggle and work every day to try to feed our families and pay you your pound of flesh.

The Toronto Star recently had an article about being evicted and what tenants can do.  The advice was good but very limited as most mainstream media is these days.

This Is A War Against Tenants And the Working Class

The reality is workers are being laid off or even fired in place of third world factories with no human rights.

Even in Toronto many workers are given a low severance and an evil “good bye” as companies seek cheaper labour as they outsource.

Tenants are victims of the “gig economy” unlike Baby Boomers and Generation X who had it so easy in an era of low costs and high wages and even idiots and high school drop outs could get high paying jobs.

They put their businesses in places where workers are treated like slaves. Workers are whipped, chained, raped and beaten…all to make sure that new iPhone gets built for a low cost.

Landlords have a social responsibility

Good Landlords Will Understand Late or None Payment of Rent And Agree For Delays

Tenants are struggling. 

Smart landlords will have some empathy and understand if you can’t pay rent on time. They will give you a break and let you have a month or two of late rent, or even free rent for a few months.

Why Will They Give You A Break? 

Because the costs and risks of renting to new tenants is huge.  They might get a game player who never pay. Or get a nasty tenant who will damage their unit or upset others (including other condo owners). They should give you a break…but….

Landlords hate Tenants who know the rules!

If You Don’t Pay On The First Will You Be Kicked Out?

No!

There is a legal process landlords must follow.

If you don’t pay rent you will have months of rent free living and the opportunity to pay (and stay in your home) after many, many months!

I Didn’t Know That! What Is the Process? 

Landlords will file what is called an N4 to tell you to pay rent.  This give you 14 days to pay, but even if you don’t pay it’s okay!

The N4 is pure intimidation, you don’t have to move! LLs use this paper work to intimidate & threaten.

So If I Don’t Pay I Will Get Kicked Out?

No. 

Not at all, you are protected. You don’t have to pay for 14 days…and if you don’t pay in 14 days the landlord has to “apply” for a “Hearing Date” which can take 6 months or more (and you can pay right up to the date you will be evicted).  So you have months to pay the rent.

So What Happens If I Don’t Pay On The First Of The Month?

The N4 gives you two weeks to pay. You don’t have to pay the rent on the 1st of the month!

The landlord needs to then apply for a “court date” at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

These dates are between 6 to 18 months. That means you have a breather for a long time! 

In These Crazy Economic Times You Deserve a Break At Your Landlords Profits Expense!

Nothing can happen until you go to “court” at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

What Happens In The Period of Not Paying And the Hearing Date?

Nothing. 

You don’t have to pay a cent. And your landlord can’t harass you. 

If they do you can call the government Bad Landlord Police and get the landlord fined and even criminally charged!

You can also call the police.

So I Can Not Pay For Many Months and Still Stay In My Rental?

Yes. 

It’s not “your rental” it’s “your home”. 

The landlord will have to wait for months to get a “court date” at the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB).

What If I Want To Stay, Should I Pay All Rent Before the LTB Hearing?

No. Don’t be foolish.  This is a “business negotiation”.

Go to the Hearing. You are the victim and your landlord is getting rich thanks to your suffering and poverty!  LTB judges know this!

The LTB has a room where tenants and landlords can “work things out” called mediation.

You can agree to pay the rent owed, but why not negotiate?  Say you will pay 20% to avoid a “trial” at the LTB. 

Many landlords will be happy to get the money and avoid the stress of going in front of an LTB adjudicator and potentially getting nothing.

Landlords are scared of trials where they will be held accountable for their crimes against humanity. Google “Nuremberg trials“.

How Can I Prepare For the LTB Hearing?

The best defense is a good offense.

Let’s walk you through this….Take a look around your home.

Do you see any maintenance issues?

Remember: no house is perfect so for sure you can find something.  Mold, stairs not up to code, fridge is not super cold, etc, etc. etc.  You can use this as a weapon!

Do I Have To Tell My Landlord About These Problems Before the Trial?

NO!

Don’t tell them. 

Bring them up at the LTB hearing and SHOCK your landlord.

This will immediately lead the adjudicator to cancel your hearing and book another one so the landlord can fix the things you brought up (hint: bring up a lot of stuff!)

You get another 3 – 6 months of rent free living. You need this help you SURVIVE in this crazy property owner controlled brutal capitalist world!

Landlords call this “trial by ambush” but it’s just part of the legal system to protect good tenants. And it will give you months of more free rent.

This is the best way for poor working class tenants to fight their rich “villa in Paris” or “apartments in China or Iran”.

More Help For Tenants

Remember you can get free legal help (and your landlord doesn’t and has to pay thousands).

Yes, it’s free!  And it will lead your landlord to have to pay for legal representation and while you get if free they will be charged $250 to $400+ per hour! 

You can bleed your landlord dry as they can’t afford these rates.  You pay nothing and they have to pay $300/hour and you can bankrupt them, as many tenants have done (not reported but we all know the score).

So I Don’t Need To Pay For Months And Can Still Live In My Rental Home?

Yes. 

The whole process will take at least 6 to 8+ months (you can live rent free). 

You Can Also Appeal

After 6-8 months to a year of living rent free, and using this money to pay for university and better food for your kids you still have option.  You can pay and stay or you can just leave.

Stay Strong! Don’t Be Intimidated! Learn How ‘The System’ Works To Protect Your Family!

Tenants Waking Up And Fighting For Our Rights

If you can’t pay rent don’t be intimidated. You have a system that protects you and you can even not pay and stay in your home for months (or years if you are smart).

How Ontario Tenants Can Easily & Legally Break Your Lease

Saturday, April 20th, 2019

Tenants Speak Out and Share Their Concerns and Opinions on the Rental Industry.

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association.

How Ontario Tenants Can Easily & Legally Break Your Lease In 2019!

Because of the hard work of Tenants we finally have some new changes that are fair and promote justice for Tenants.

All the law-abiding landlords out there will support this post because it’s just explaining the rules and laws to help tenants, just as landlords help each other.

Landlords Can’t Lock Tenants In To Fixed Term Leases

In April 2017 we saw the provincial government finally listen to our concerns and they created the Rental Fairness Act which makes changes to the Residential Tenancies Act.

Now landlords can’t collect arrears for rent due once Tenants receive a “Termination Notice”.

You can see in the Residential Tenancies Act, Section 37, that states that once the landlord gives the Tenant a notice of termination, the tenancy ends of that date of termination the landlord put in the notice.

With the Rental Fairness Act we finally get some real clear facts on once the Tenant gets the termination date, you break your lease:

134(1.1) No landlord shall, directly or indirectly, with respect to any rental unit, collect or require or attempt to collect or require from a former tenant of the rental unit any amount of money purporting to be rent in respect of,

(a) any period after the tenancy has terminated and the tenant has vacated the rental unit; or

(b) any period after the tenant’s interest in the tenancy has terminated and the tenant has vacated the rental unit. 2017, c. 13, s. 24 (2).

What Does This Mean For Tenants? It Means You Can Get Out of Fixed Term Leases

The best thing that all Ontario Tenants should know is this gives you an easy way to break your fixed term lease.

And landlords cannot go after you in small claims court or the Landlord and Tenant Board for breaking the lease, because it’s landlords who told YOU TO MOVE.

For example you might want to move because the landlord is a jerk, or the neighbours are noisy or smoking, or maybe you found a nicer or cheaper place.  You are no longer “locked in” like a slave.

How Can Tenants Break a Fixed Term Lease Under the New Rules?

Remember, if the landlord gives you a notice with a “termination date” of “do this or the tenancy ends” you can just….don’t do what they say…and break the lease! 

“Pay By This Date Or Move Out”…Ok, just move out and it’s terminated!

What’s the Best Way For Tenants To Break A Fixed Term Lease?

There are lots of ways now! Sure it’s a little bit sneaky but Tenants have to do what have to do to survive in this unfair situation.

(1) Don’t Pay Rent and Get the N4

Probably the best way to break the lease is just don’t pay rent. The landlord will give you an N4 ‘Pay Up or Be Evicted Notice’ with a termination date. The termination date will usually be 15 days after they give the notice. Since they are the ones who want to terminate the lease you just don’t pay and agree with them…and there is nothing the landlord can do! Again, here’s how it works.

Step 1 – Rent is Due

Step 2 – You Don’t Pay Rent

Step 3 – The landlord wants your money so will give you N4 Notice to End The Tenancy For Non-Payment of Rent

Step 4 – The N4 says: “Pay this amount by…. (This is called the termination date) or Move Out By the Termination Date

Step 5 – Just move out at the termination date and the lease is broken and you are home free!!

(2) Make Some Disturbances and Get the N5

Make lots of noise and the landlord will probably give you an N5 Notice to End Your Tenancy For Interfering With Others, Damage or Overcrowding. It will have a termination date and then you get out of it. I am giving you this notice because I want to end your tenancy. I want you to move out of your rental unit by the following termination date _____

Step 1:  Make Noise, Damages or Overcrowd the rental

Step 2: The Landlord Will Give You an N5

Step 3. The N5 Will Have A Termination Date

Step 4 On or Before the Termination Date……….just move out by the termination date and you are home free!!

Try not to bother other Tenants so much, but noise, smoking or these types of things will lead to an N5 and then you can leave free and in peace for a better, cheaper apartment.

Try to talk with other tenants so if you are making noise or going to smoke or flood the place, they can complain quickly to the landlord get get the N5 process going fast without really creating any trouble for your fellow Tenants.

Being Able To Break Fixed Term Leases Easily Is the First Step in Creating a Better Rental Industry – Especially When It’s The Landlord Telling You To “Obey or Get Out”…So Get Out!

Things are still really unfair. But I want to make sure Tenants are at least aware how the new rules make it okay to break fixed term leases. I’ll write more later on and hope other Tenants and fair-minded landlords can make positive contributions here.

It’s Time For Real Fairness For Ontario Tenants

Let’s work together and finally create a fair playing field for Ontario Tenants. I know many of you will be amazed at my first contribution and there will be many more to come because it’s time for FAIRNESS.

Critique My Plan To Not Pay Rent for 8 Months (Part 1)

Monday, July 2nd, 2018

ola stop paying rent

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.  Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at landlordtenantsolutions@groupmail.com

Critique My Plan Not To Pay Rent For 8 Months

I asked that my situation be posted to help other victimized tenants who find ourselves paying so much money to landlords.

We cannot afford to get out the viscous circle of working hard just to have a place to live and the landlord is taking so much money from us. It is like a drug dealer making money of people who need drugs because they are addicted.

Tenants in Ontario have almost no one to help us and the vacancy rates are so low and rents are so high we need to work together and help each other.

While landlords can use our rent money to hire lawyers and have all the politicians in their pockets tenants need to stop fighting and finally create a unified voice to stop being exploited.

I’m Not Moving

Where I live is like a home to me and really comfy and convenient. My boss lives near here and can pick me up to go to work and take me home which is a huge bonus. So no way do I want to move, but am just short of money due to unforeseen consequences which are not my fault.

I will move in January 2019 because after some time trying to make money it’s back to school for me and here are no half-decent unis here. Education is expensive and paying for a place to live means money. Add in books, clothes, money for nightlife and any money to be saved will mean a jump start for my future and my life enjoyment.

After lots of study here is what is on the table:

JUNE 1

1. On June 1st I just don’t do the normal e-transfer to my landlord.

2. If the landlord calls me I need to answer as part of my way to delay everything. So I’m going to make an excuse.

This is what my script is so far (suggestions welcomed!):

“Oh geez I’m so sorry about this. You know me and how we get along and I want to stay here a long time. It’s just that my work screwed up the system and I didn’t get my salary this week like I always do! It’s crazy now with so many computer screw ups and I’m mad as hell about it. The good thing is my boss said the money will be arriving in my bank account soon.

The only reason I didn’t call you yesterday is because the money should be in my account now! I’m sorry about it and the money will be coming soon. How’s your summer going? I’m going to clean up the lawn and plant some flowers if you don’t mind (bullshit, bullshit, bullshit to throw her off the scent!)”

3. I try to delay this as long as possible and think I can string her along until the 3rd week because I know she doesn’t want me to move and have to spend the time and energy of finding someone else to take his place. She knows she would lose at least a month or two trying to fill it.

And she won’t want to pay to clean it up because the place is a bit weedy if you know what I mean because some of my friends and I light it up on the week-ends and smoke a few joints.

4. I call and say “good news I’m getting double pay on July 1 so you will get two months of rent. I’m sorry about this (blah, blah, blah). So June uses my last months rent I paid and now the rest is gravy.

JULY

5. I don’t send the e-transfer again with the landlord expecting 2 months of rent. Best move (I think) is to continue to delay.

But I’m sure she will eventually give me the N-4 form to pay or leave. So let’s say I get that on July 2nd. The N-4 gives me 14 days to pay and there is nothing the landlord can do about it.

Now we are at July 17.

The landlord will have to file an L1 to take me to the Landlord and Tenant Board. I called the LTB and found that these eviction trial dates take at least 6 weeks to be held. So that would lead me to around September 3rd to 10th.

STATUS REPORT:

-Last month rent I paid when I moved in used for June

-No rent payment needed for July

-No rent payment needed for August

-No rent payment needed for September

This means the landlord doesn’t have any of my hard earned money and there was no need to pay for July/August/September rent.

LTB EVICTION TRIAL STRATEGY

I read here and now realize tenants HAVE TO ATTEND to defend ourselves. If not we could get an unfair decision.

I also read we can get a free lawyer at the LTB at the day of the eviction trial. We just need to go a bit early and wait for the free tenant lawyers or paralegals to call out they are seeing people and will represent us against the landlords. 

The best way to avoid getting kicked out is to create some maintenance claims because under the law landlords are responsible for all maintenance and repairs and my enjoyment of the property:

“The reason I didn’t pay rent is because the landlord refused to fix things and it has made my life a nightmare, especially as a young person who is struggling with perilous employment and health issues.”

The strategy is to get my girlfriend who is living here with me to act as a witness and we are going to have documentation:

-the toilet doesn’t flush so we can’t even use the bathroom

-it’s so hot and the bedroom windows don’t open all the way and i makes it even difficult to sleep

-there are ants on the patio and they keep coming in and the landlord won’t do anything about it

-etc.

Remember that one tenant on the forum told me “no house is perfect” so this will void the Eviction trial and the landlord will have to fix things and I will give them one month to do it, so that will cover October rent and I will agree to pay once the repairs are done. 

OCTOBER

I won’t pay rent and will file with the LTB and tell them the landlord didn’t make the repairs up to my satisfaction and will have my girlfriend as a witness.

I will give the landlord 30 more days and demand she brings EVERY person she hired to testify in person at the LTB (good luck with that) and also demand that if any of them are not licensed and insured I don’t feel same in my home.

NOVEMBER

I’m sure the landlord will file for eviction and I will counter with a tenant rights complaint about more needed repairs in the apartment. This should give me at least another six weeks.

JANUARY 2019

At this point they will probably try to get the sheriff or whatever it is to evict me but I read here that is also very slow and can takes week. Anyways I don’t really give a sh*t because I’ll be leaving at the end of the month to go to school.

STATUS REPORT:

-Last month rent was used for June

-No rent payment needed for July

-No rent payment needed for August

-No rent payment needed for September

-No rent payment needed for October

-No rent payment need for November

-No rent payment needed for December

-No rent payment needed for January

CONCLUSION

Pretty sure this will work and only me a couple days at the LTB. Hoping others experienced with this will chime in to help me perfect my strategy.

I will eventually pay my landlord once I get a secure white collar position but right now it’s all about my survival and MY FUTURE! I will follow up on how things are going and will continue to take a stand for tenant rights in Ontario!

Ontario Landlords Need To Be Protected – The Current System Just Isn’t Fair!

Monday, December 4th, 2017

ola landlords speak out

Ontario Landlords Speak Out and Share Their Concerns and Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

The Rental Fairness Act Isn’t Fair For Landlords – Ontario Small Landlords Need More Protection

ola it's not fair

Tens of thousands of small landlords emailed in as part of our drive to create a way for landlords and tenants to communicate with each other to find positive common ground. While there are some unethical landlords out there, by far the vast majority of us try our best to be excellent landlords with attractive, well-maintained rentals.

The vast majority of small Ontario landlords play by the rules and care for our tenants and our properties.

The Ontario Rules Do Not Protect Small Landlords And This Isn’t Fair

One of the most common themes in all the replies was that while landlords want to learn and follow the rules those same rules often don’t adequately protect small landlords.

This means landlords who make sure they do everything according to the Residential Tenancies Act and the Landlord and Tenant Board still find themselves in very difficult situations stemming from bad tenants. These bad situations often mean losing thousands of dollars.

However it also goes beyond just financial losses.

Under the existing system landlords experiencing incredible stress, worry and sleepless nights when they are just using the system in place and following the rules. This isn’t right and this isn’t fair.

Good people making huge investments in our province need to be protected and must not be subjected to tenants who can easily manipulate the rules to cause harm and huge financial losses. Recently there was a good media story of a tenant who created a fake credit report to trick landlords into renting to him. He then ripped off his landlords and also cheated other tenants. He is now wanted by the police.

Let’s Protect Good Tenants, But We Also Need to Protect Good Landlords

Most of our small landlord members were renting themselves not that long ago. We are the working class looking to support our retirements and hopefully get some cash flow as a return on our investments. Many of us rented as students at Ontario universities and colleges and many others rented while beginning their careers.

We support protections for tenants, but we need to also protect good landlords. Currently things are simply not balanced.

What Happened To The Changes To Encourage More People To Invest in Rental Properties?

It was only a year or so ago that that landlords were asked to present needed changes to the Ministry. The request was for current landlords to suggest new policy ideas to help them succeed, and this would in turn encourage more people to become landlords in Ontario.

It was a good idea as with a better, fairer system more people would invest in rental properties and this would lead to more choices for tenants and more affordable rental housing in Ontario.

Our landlord members were not worried about increased competition from new landlords and investors. In fact, they were very enthusiastic and excited about getting changes that are desperately needed to help landlords continue to even run existing rentals. With a better system and more protections, landlords could better deal with bad tenants who abuse the system.

More Protections for Ontario Tenants But What About Fairness for Small Landlords?

When the Rental Fairness Act was announced in April many landlords were excited and expected to hear about new protections for small landlords. An Ottawa landlord organized an online event and many our members networked and watched the news conference on the Premier’s YouTube channel.

After the news conference good Ontario landlords were extremely disappointed, and many were upset.

For while there were many changes designed to help tenants, there was little to help small landlords. No one objected to helping good tenants but wasn’t the goal to encourage more great people to invest and create a lot more amazing rental properties?

A Toronto Landlord asked: “Why are the concerns of small landlords ignored as we are key stake-holders in Ontario and important rental housing providers!?”

Some of the major challenges Ontario landlords are facing include:

Evicting for Smoking

Dealing with tenants who smoke, and have this smoke bother other tenants, has been a problem for many small landlords for years. With new laws regarding marijuana this issue is just going to become larger and we need to find a solution.

Creating a New System to Help Landlords and Tenants with Pets

Our landlord members love pets and many have pets of their own. However, we need a way to make sure tenants take care of their pets and don’t damage the rental property. 

Ontario Landlords Association members suggested we create a voluntary “pet deposit”. Tenants with pets would pay a deposit to protect the small landlord from any damages from the pets (and they do happen). When the tenants move out they will get the deposit back if there aren’t any big damages. If their aren’t any pet damages and the landlord doesn’t give the deposit back the tenant can take pictures, file at the LTB, and get the deposit back.

Making the Rent Increase Guideline More Fair For Service Oriented Small Landlords

With even newer rental properties covered by the rent increase guideline (which is only 1.8% in 2018) we need a way to make sure the guideline covers the true cost increases landlords face.

Making the Landlord and Tenant Board More Efficient and Effective

When landlords have problems with renters in their properties we have to go to the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) to seek justice and fix the problems. While most LTB staff are hard working and professional, the way the LTB is designed needs to be improved.

-We cannot continue to have landlords waiting for weeks or even months to even get a Hearing date.

-We cannot continue to have tenants ‘ambushing’ landlords with maintenance claims at the Hearing.

-We need the Enforcement Office to enforce LTB evictions in a time sensitive way, meaning days not weeks or months 

This is just the start of issues that need to be addressed.

Closing Loopholes Exploited By Bad Tenants

We need to make sure the Landlord and Tenant Board process is fair and end loopholes that delay evictions. Some unethical tenants can delay being evicted for months.

The Rules For Small Landlords Need To Change

Small landlords are not huge corporations, massive REITS with stockholders and millions of dollars available from investors from all over the country and around the world.

Small Ontario landlords are working people who believe in the future of our province and have invested their hard-earned savings into Ontario rentals hoping for a better future. Many landlords are newcomers to Canada who want to run successful rental businesses as part of their contributions to their new country.

Ontario Landlords and Tenants Speak Out: “I Wish The Rental Fairness Act Was Fair For Landlords!”

We have asked many of the landlords who emailed in to expand on their concerns and stories of challenges they have faced owning rental properties in Ontario. We have also asked Ontario tenants who wrote in the same thing and look forward to posting their opinions and ideas.

By working together we can create a better, fairer Ontario rental industry that helps both good landlords and good tenants.

The current system just isn’t fair for small Ontario Landlords and that’s not fair

We need changes to be made to protect small landlords or we will see a big drop in investment and less high quality and affordable rental properties. We aren’t huge corporations who can put up ads near Queen’s Park and hold golf tournaments and invite Brian Mulroney to sip champagne with us…we are too busy working and taking care of our rental properties.

Who are small landlords?

We are teachers, contractors, electricians, firefighters, police officers, nurses, doctors, lawyers, Realtors…we are the people of Ontario. And we have been treated unfairly for too long.

Small landlords need support as we truly are important stake-holders in Ontario and need to be protected as the current system simply isn’t fair.