Posts Tagged ‘Landlord Legal’

LANDLORD ALERT! RTA amendments take effect today: New and revised Rules, guidelines and brochures

Wednesday, September 1st, 2021

The Ontario Landlords Association has been lobbying hard for years and helping make positive changes to the laws to protect Small Landlords.

We stopped many anti-landlord laws before and now are working relentlessly to create a fair system.

Join us, make your voice heard, and help make even more positive changes to help good landlords and good tenants succeed in win-win business relationships.

September 1, 2021 

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Members

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 RTA amendments take effect today

We are writing to remind your Ontario Landlords Association Members that amendments to the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (RTA) resulting from Bill 184, take effect today. We have summarized the changes in September 1, 2021 Amendments to the Residential Tenancies Act.

In response to these amendments, the LTB has posted new and revised Rules, guidelines and forms to our website at tribunalsontario.ca/LTB.

New materials:

  • Form L10: Application to Collect Money a Former Tenant Owes and Instructions
  • Certificate of Service: Serving a Former Tenant or a Tenant no Longer in Possession of the Rental Unit
  • Request to Use Alternative Service Form
  • Brochure: Collecting Money a Former Tenant Owes
  • Brochure: How to Serve a Landlord or Tenant with Documents

Revised materials:

  • Rules 3, 4, and 5
  • Guideline 11: Eviction for Failure to Pay Rent
  • Guideline 12: Eviction for Personal Use, Demolition, Repairs and Conversion
  • Form T5: Landlord Gave a Notice of Termination in Bad Faith and Instructions
  • Form L2: Application to End a Tenancy and Evict a Tenant and Instructions.

** The revised L2: Application will only be available in fillable PDF format until the launch of the new Tribunals Ontario Portal later this fall. Please do not use LTB e-File to file based on an N12 or N13 notice or when claiming costs relating to substantial interference or utilities. In these cases, you must use the PDF form and submit it by fax, mail or courier.

The LTB consulted on these materials and processes from January 19 to February 5, 2021.

Among the changes the LTB made as a result of the consultations, the LTB has added email as an approved method for landlords to serve former tenants and introduced a Request to use Alternative Service Method. For more information about email service and alternative service, see the Certificate of Service – Serving a Former Tenant or Tenant No Longer in Possession of the Rental Unit and the Brochure: Collecting Money a Former Tenant Owes.

Users will be able to file the new and revised forms on the Tribunals Ontario Portal when it launches later this fall.

Sincerely,

Karen Restoule                    Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar

How To Speed Up Getting Your Eviction Enforced

Monday, May 17th, 2021

May 14, 2021

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 Expedited Enforcement of Eviction Orders

On May 13, 2021 the Government of Ontario announced that the stay-at-home order would be extended until June 2, 2021. Ontario Regulation 266/21 made under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act will also remain in effect during this time.

Ontario Regulation 266/21 states that the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) cannot enforce any Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) eviction order unless the order asks the Sheriff to expedite the enforcement.  The Sheriff can resume enforcing all eviction orders after the Government of Ontario removes the regulation.

The LTB is continuing to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

The purpose of this memo is to provide information on when an eviction order issued by the LTB may include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement.

Section 84 of the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (“RTA”) says that the LTB must include such a request to the Sheriff in the order where the tenant is being evicted for certain types of very serious conduct, and the adjudicator has not delayed the enforcement date pursuant to section 83(1)(b) of the RTA. The grounds for eviction in section 84 are:

  • Willfully damaging the rental unit
  • Using the unit in a way which is inconsistent with residential use and caused, or is likely to cause, significant damage
  • Committing an illegal act in the unit involving the production or trafficking of illegal drugs
  • Seriously impairing someone’s safety
  • Substantially interfering with the landlord’s reasonable enjoyment – in cases where the landlord and tenant live in the same building and the building has three or fewer residential units

If a landlord believes that an eviction order should include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement, but the application is not based on any of the grounds contained in section 84 of the RTA, the landlord may raise this issue during the hearing. The adjudicator may consider whether the tenant is responsible for an urgent problem such as a serious and ongoing health or safety issue at the residential complex or a serious illegal act that occurred at the residential complex. The tenant will have the opportunity to make submissions on this issue if they are at the hearing.

If the hearing for the landlord’s eviction application has already been completed but the order has not been issued, the landlord may contact the LTB to ask the adjudicator who held the hearing to consider adding to the order a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement of eviction. Landlords can submit a request to expedite enforcement of the eviction by fax, mail or email. The tenant will have an opportunity to make submissions on this issue.

Eviction orders that have already been issued can only be changed if the order contains a serious error or a clerical mistake. If a landlord believes that an order contains a serious error, the landlord may file a request to review the order. If the landlord believes that the order contains a clerical mistake, the landlord may file a request to amend the order. More information on this process is available on the Application and Hearing Process page of our website.

We remain committed to updating you about operational planning and we are appreciative of your patience and cooperation as we continue to adjust our operations in response to the ongoing pandemic.

Sincerely,

Karen Restoule

Associate Chair

Lynn Dicaire

Registrar

Ontario Landlord Tenant Board Is Facing New Challenges And Needs Your Help

Friday, January 1st, 2021

Let’s Fix The Landlord and Tenant Board in 2021

Small Ontario landlords were happy when the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) finally re-opened and began having video hearings.

The LTB had been closed for months and this led to some tenants not paying rent. Not getting rent created severe financial challenges for thousands of small ‘mom and pop’ landlords all over Ontario.

A Disaster For Small Landlords

Some landlords even had to sell their rental properties because they needed rent in order to help cover their mortgages, property taxes, and increasingly expensive maintenance costs.

Many others had to max out their credit cards, get loans and borrow money just to keep from going bankrupt. They are now worried about getting the needed income to pay for these huge debts.

For many small landlords the LTB shut down was a nightmare.

When the LTB finally re-opened small landlords felt better and began to trust the system to help them. However, there was great frustration within our community over the long wait times to get a hearing date.

Finally, over the past couple of months the LTB has started to operate efficiently to clear the incredibly long backlog of cases.

Small landlords, at last, began to see the light at the end of the dark, long tunnel.

Tenant Groups: The Landlord and Tenant Board Is In a “Crisis”

Now that hearings have started many tenant groups are unhappy and want to shut down the LTB.

They say there is a crisis at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

They claim that the online hearings are unfair to tenants who have not been treated with respect. In addition, they say some LTB adjudicators are not acting professionally and denying tenants their legal rights.

This led the NDP to call for a shut down of the LTB

The NDP wants to shut down the LTB and ban evictions.

All tenants get free legal help (no matter their income) and the legal clinics have reached out to the Human Rights Commission to halt Hearings and re-examine LTB decisions over the past few months.

Ontario Small Landlords Need The LTB To Remain Open…We Also Want Fairness for Both Good Landlords And Good Tenants

Most small ‘mom and pop’ landlords are good, working class people who want to create high quality, affordable housing. We want to take care of our tenants and our rentals and hope it can help provide a little bit of cash flow and help us during our retirement.

We used to rent ourselves and have relatives and friends who rent now. We have nothing against good tenants and just want a fair, efficient system to help both good landlords and good tenants.

These are challenging times and the LTB reached out to the Ontario Landlords Association to ask for our members help.

This was sent to us by the leadership of the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board:

December 22, 2020

TO:                 Ontario Landlords Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair,  Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 Year-end Message from the LTB Associate Chair and Registrar

It has been a hard year for so many of us, and for so many reasons.

As a result of COVID-19, LTB operations have transformed at unprecedented speed and scale. Our service counters remain closed and hearings continue to be conducted by videoconference, teleconference, and through written submissions.

The LTB has been working continuously to offer quality dispute resolution for the thousands of people across the province who rely on us while prioritizing the health and safety of all.

During this change, we would like to express our appreciation for you, our stakeholders, for your patience, cooperation, and shared commitment to fair and timely dispute resolution.

In July, as a result of amendments to the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (RTA) the LTB proposed changes to its Rules, guidelines, and forms and opened the door to public and stakeholder input. In August and September, we met virtually with more than 15 stakeholder groups and received more than 40 written submissions. Since then, we have met virtually with more than 18 stakeholder groups.

Your willingness to engage openly and honestly with the LTB has been important to our process. Not only did we receive helpful feedback on the proposed changes to our materials and procedures as a result of Bill 184, but you also raised concerns and offered advice related to topics like virtual hearings, electronic filing, and the use of alternative dispute resolution.

The LTB is committed to open and ongoing stakeholder engagement. We value your experience and perspective on landlord and tenant matters.

In January, we will organize another round of engagement meetings with stakeholders. These meetings will complement a call for written feedback on proposed changes to guidelines and forms for upcoming RTA changes related to Bill 184. We welcome your input on our proposed changes to our processes and procedures. We hope you will participate.

Before we close, we’d like to take this opportunity to share a few operational updates.

We will continue to hear tenant applications and urgent matters from December 22 to January 4. In early January, the LTB will add landlord-seized and adjourned matters to the schedule, and landlord and tenant case management hearings will resume. Hearings for all application types will resume on January 18, 2021.

Finally, as we continue to work to address the large volume of pending applications and requests, we continue to ask for your patience.

Applicants will continue to experience delays. At this time, the LTB is shifting its operational staff to respond to priority areas and cannot provide accurate application processing and customer service response times. Once an application is processed, a letter will be sent to the applicant providing their file number so they can Check File Status on our website for their hearing date once it has been scheduled.

To stay up-to-date on other developments at the LTB, we encourage you to visit our website regularly and subscribe to our Latest News.

Thank you again for your continued engagement with the LTB. This meaningful dialogue provides the LTB with a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by our users and helps us to identify opportunities to improve everyone’s experience with the board.

On behalf of all LTB staff and adjudicators, please accept our warmest wishes for a safe holiday and Happy New Year. We look forward to connecting with you in 2021.

Warmly,

[original signed by]       [original signed by]

Karen Restoule

Associate Chair

Lynn Dicaire

Registrar

 

Let’s Fix The LTB in 2021

We appreciate the LTB reaching out to us once again.

Many don’t realize the OLA stopped a lot of extremely anti-small landlord measures in the past by being in regular contact with former Premier Kathleen Wynne (also when she was Housing Minister) and explaining our positions.

For example, “Own Use Evictions” still exist…when it almost didn’t thanks to the efforts of many of our senior OLA members.

Small Ontario landlords need the LTB to remain open to evict those who haven’t pay rent for months and leading to ridiculously unfair hardship on us.

We also understand the tenant groups frustration with some adjudicators not being fair. The LTB is a “court” and we need to make sure that the LTB treats both landlords and tenants with respect and the ability to make our cases.

Small Ontario Landlords Can Provide Solutions

Make sure you contact us with your ideas, concerns and hopes to fix the LTB and protect good landlords and good tenants (and making sure the bad apples are treated accordingly.)

There are too many “one person” shows now and we need to all come together and be united. Together we are strong.

Contact Us – Make Sure Your Voice Is Heard LOUD AND CLEAR:

Please send us your thought and ideas.

What happens in the next 30 days will have a major impact on the Ontario private rental industry for years to come.

Play a role and get your voice heard!

Email: landlordvoices2021@activist.com

It’s Important To Pay Your Rent To Your Small Landlord

Friday, September 11th, 2020

My name is Laura and I post under my name on the Ontario Landlords Forum. I’ve been active there for years to try to help other tenants and give some of my advice to help small landlords too.

These are crazy times for everyone.

And while tenants are suffering it’s also important to know your landlord might be suffering too. This pandemic is hurting everyone.

We Need To Stick Together

I used to own a house and we rented our basement out years ago and it really helped us cover our mortgage. When my husband died my children were grown so I decided to sell the house and rent.

Renting has a lot of advantages.

I don’t have to worry about any maintenance issues and my landlady has a service to cut the lawn and plow the snow.  My landlord cover my utilities so she can get just one payment each month to keep things uncomplicated.

My landlady is a teacher and her husband has his own contracting company and they are terrific.

“Are You Going To Pay The Rent?”

When all this chaos started in March and the government said “tenants don’t have to pay rent” my landlady called me and asked me if I was going to pay the rent.

I told her “of course I will”. She was thankful and said if I needed a break just call her.

My Landlady Is Professional and Kind, And I Make Paying Rent A Priority

I’m in a pretty good situation where I don’t need to worry about buying food and my children are adults now.  I know others might not be as safe as I am.

I’m going to pay the rent not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because I want to keep my excellent relationship with my landlady and know that if I don’t pay rent it could hurt her financially (and even lead to her selling this place).

Pay You Rent And If You Can’t Call Your Landlord

My landlady isn’t some big global corporation. She and her family invested and thanks to them I have a great place to stay at a great price.

Rent Strike Hits Small Landlords, Not The Corporate Landlords

-Not paying rent will just get rid of the small nice landlords who care about you.

-Not paying rent will not impact the big heartless corporations.

-The whole “rent strike” people are likely corporate landlords who want to get rid of small landlords who are their competition.  At least that’s what I think.

Stay Home and Stay Safe!

I’m so happy to have a great rental with a great landlady. I feel safe and don’t ever want to move.

With Love And Wishing Everyone Stays Safe,

Laura

 

Bill 184 – The “Tenant Slaughter And Un-Protection Act”

Tuesday, July 21st, 2020

Disclaimer: “This isn’t an attack on landlords. This is an attack on the system that got us here.”

“Let’s make a payment plan. Let’s avoid the LTB, work together (tenant signs)….GOT YOU… Hahaha I can now evict you fast, you have no legal rights now! SUCKER! The Sheriff is coming now to kick you out!”

Tenants need to be aware of the huge challenges we are soon going to face!

While the Premier has acted all kind and cuddly (like that fat drunk uncle we all see during the holidays who laughs as he passes gas and then beats your aunt to bloody pulp when they get home) it’s only an act.

The reality is those of us who rightfully didn’t pay rent (or full rent) are being prepared for the slaughterhouse (legally)!

It’s called Bill 184 and you can bet it will soon be the law and the slaughter of tenants will begin.

The government will not forgive tenants not paying and instead are going to demand tenants agree to “payment plans” that bypass the legal process of going to the Landlord and Tenant Board for a legal Hearing (where tenants have rights and free legal help)

The NDP came up with a plan to help tenants cover rent by using government funds to help during the horrible pandemic.

Even some landlord groups such as the Ontario Landlords Association proposed this as a way for tenants and their landlords to avoid conflict and avoid evictions.

Lots of other industries have received government support, so why not residential tenants and their landlords?

No, that would have been too easy and too nice. Why be nice when they want a slaughter and I think they enjoy seeing us suffer!

Suze Morrison is an NDP MPP who wants to protect tenants. Morrison is very aware of the reality and the coming avalanche of mass evictions based on landlords legally being able to trick tenants into forfeiting our legal rights.

Thousands of tenants in Ontario are lying awake at night, worrying about losing the roof over their head when the province’s weak pause on the enforcement of evictions ends.

They wouldn’t be this position if Doug Ford had answered the NDP’s call to provide a rent subsidy to tenants who have lost income or their job due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but here we are.

As if this wasn’t bad enough, the Ford government has found a way to make things even worse.

Now, in the middle of the pandemic, the Conservatives are attempting to quietly ram through legislation that will make it easier for landlords to evict tenants.

Don’t be fooled by the name of the legislation. Bill 184, the Protecting Tenants and Strengthening Community Housing Act, is bad for tenants.

Tenants already faced an uphill battle at the Landlord and Tenant Board, squaring off against often deep-pocketed landlords and their high-priced lawyers. If passed, Ford’s eviction bill will leave tenants with fewer defences to avail themselves of and fewer opportunities to plead their case.

Consider the case of a landlord who refuses to fix a malfunctioning radiator in a tenant’s unit. If the tenant withholds their rent, the landlord can haul them in front of the Landlord and Tenant Board.

Under Bill 184, the tenant may be prevented from pointing out other issues, like the landlord’s failure to maintain the unit in a good state of repair, at the hearing on non-payment of rent.

Bill 184 also takes away a tenant’s right to return to the Landlord and Tenant Board if they miss a payment after coming up with a repayment plan to catch up on back rent. This is especially concerning in the context of the pandemic.

Thousands of tenants in Ontario will be trying to catch up on back rent after losing their income or job. What if they feel pressured to accept a repayment plan and fall behind on payments despite their best efforts? What if their financial circumstances change because there’s a second wave of COVID-19?

Under Bill 184, there’s no opportunity to revisit the repayment plan at the Landlord and Tenant Board. Tenants could find a sheriff knocking on their door, ready to enforce their eviction, the second they miss a payment.

The Ford government can claim that its eviction bill is about “protecting tenants” all it wants. But even Steve Clark, the minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, admits that the legislation is about moving things along at the Landlord and Tenant Board when the government switches the lights back on.

In this very paper, he wrote: “We know that when regular hearings resume at the LTB, there will be a backlog of cases requiring resolution. That’s why this legislation is important today — in light of COVID-19.”

Yes, there will be a backlog of cases. The enforcement of evictions may be on hold for now, but that hasn’t stopped landlords from threatening tenants with eviction — even for partial rent payments.

And what is the Ford government doing with thousands of evictions on the horizon in Ontario? Instead of helping tenants keep up with rent, and in turn ensuring landlords get paid, the government is greasing the gears of the Landlord and Tenant Board to speed up evictions.

Tenants deserve better than a government that claims it’s protecting them when it’s really making them more vulnerable to losing the roof over their heads.

It’s time for the Ford government to scrap its plan to make evictions easier and step up with rent relief to help see tenants through the economic pain of COVID-19.