Posts Tagged ‘landlord advocacy’

Small Residential Landlords Need Support

Saturday, April 25th, 2020

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We Explained And Premier Ford Gets It  – 

“A lot of them aren’t big landlords. They’re just hard-working people that might have a couple units that are trying to survive.”

Ontario Landlords Association members have been relentless in getting our message across to those in power. Our businesses are at stake!

We are working hard together to support fellow landlords and our tenants in need during this crisis. Wow, we’ve been working non-stop!

Via phone calls, emails, zoom meetings and more, our members across Ontario have been in constant regular contact with MPPs (including Cabinet Ministers), the Ministry of Housing, and even Premier Ford himself.

Protecting Small Landlords, Our Rental Businesses, And Our Tenants

Thanks to our members the message is getting through as Premier Ford stated his support for small residential landlords saying:

“A lot of them aren’t big landlords. They’re just hard-working people that might have a couple units that are trying to survive.”

Our message has been heard.  Loud and Clear.

Ontario Is Reopening Under The Guidance of Premier Ford

Ontario premier Doug Ford said he will announce details for a gradual reopening Ontario next week. He reiterated that the plan to restart the economy will be a slow process that unfolds in phases.

With May 1 approaching, Ontario Premier Doug Ford said today the province is asking the federal government to help with a residential rent relief program.

“Today, I’ll ask the prime minister to work with us on a program for residential tenants,” he said.

His announcement comes on the heels of prime minister Justin Trudeau detailing a program for commercial rent relief that the federal government is implementing in partnership with the provinces. Ford said the commercial rent relief program will cost $900 million.

Ford added that he will “push the federal government” on rent relief.

We’re doing it with businesses, now we need to do it with tenants and landlords for residents,” he added. “A lot of them aren’t big landlords. They’re just hard-working people that might have a couple units that are trying to survive.

He said the federal government has been a “fabulous” partner “but we need more. We need more for residential rent.

The Minister of Housing supports our cause saying “When these families are forced to choose between food and rent, it also impacts Ontario landlords and the stability of our rental housing sector.”

Clark wrote a request to help small residential landlords to the Trudeau government this week.

Your Voice Is Being Heard, Now We Need To Step On The Gas Pedal!

Small landlords have invested their savings and bought rental properties across the province. This has created hundreds of thousands of affordable, high quality rentals all over Ontario.

We need to be protected as we have put our faith into creating high quality rental properties…just like the properties we always wanted to rent!

Help Us Make Change to Protect Small Residential Landlords!

Let us know your thoughts and opinions and it will be sent to Premier Doug Ford and those in the top positions of power.

Landlord Tenant Board In-Person Hearings Suspended

Saturday, March 14th, 2020

Important News For Landlords: In-Person Hearings Are Cancelled. What About Landlords Who Are Owed Rent Or Need To Evict A Bad Tenant?

According to provincial government, as the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve, Tribunals Ontario is taking action to safeguard the health and well-being of front-line workers and Ontarians, while continuing to ensure access to justice.

Effective today (March 13, 2020), Tribunals Ontario is implementing a new policy to postpone in-person hearings and reschedule to a later date. Where feasible, alternative hearing options such as written and telephone hearings will be considered to minimize disruption to hearings across the organization. In addition, all front-line counter services will be closed as of Monday March 16 until further notice.

Tribunals Ontario will continue to provide accommodation for people who have needs related to any of the grounds listed in the Human Rights Code.

Impacted individuals with upcoming hearing dates will be notified by staff via email to make the necessary arrangements. Parties should contact their tribunal or board for more information on the new policy.

In addition, we are requesting Ontarians to not attend to any tribunal or board location in-person if they have been advised by Public Health, their doctor or the Ministry of Health website to self-isolate due to possible exposure to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Tribunals Ontario is monitoring COVID-19 developments and will update our policy based on advice from the Ministry of Health, Chief Medical Officer of Health and public health officials to protect Ontarians.

For more information contact the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board.

Let’s Fix The Laws/Encourage Landlords To Invest in 2020

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020

There are going to be some big changes coming to the Ontario rental industry in 2020. Last year the Ontario Landlords Association was asked by the Ministry to provide our recommendations for changes.

We provided a very thorough and comprehensive list that would not only encourage more investment into Ontario residential rentals, but would protect both good landlords and good tenants.

Tenant Groups Are Lobbying Hard

While we presented an important list, the tenant activist groups sent in theirs. Typical “blame the landlord” ideas which would lead good people to avoid investing and hurt tenants.

It’s Time For Change! (Before it’s too late)

We keep hearing about small landlords who face huge delays for Hearings and manipulative tenants who “use the system” to avoid paying rent and even harassing their landlords.

The key to the low vacancy rate is to change the rules to encourage more investment, especially from smaller private individuals.

Let Us Know Your Thoughts and Opinions

Please take the survey and also let us know what you think should be changed to make things better for small residential landlords in 2020!

We’ve been around for over a decade and are the only ones fighting for small landlords. Make Your Voice Heard!

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Ontario Landlords Association Partnership With The Toronto Rent Bank To Help Good Tenants And Great Landlords In 2020

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020

Ontario Landlords Association Is All About Helping Good Landlords, Good Tenants & Improving The Ontario Rental Industry – Spread The News About This Helpful Program For Tenants and Landlords

Small landlords are different than large corporate landlords in many ways.  In fact, we’ve told the Ministry of Housing that we should have different rules for small landlords versus large corporate landlords.

Many small residential landlords were once tenants ourselves. Whether it was while we were studying in college or university, when we moved out to find our first job, or when we started families and were saving up for a deposit to buy our own homes.

As people who rented ourselves, we know what tenants are looking for in finding a good rental home and a great landlord. We also know how “life happens” and no matter who you are circumstances can come up leading to job losses, illnesses, family struggles and not being able to pay rent.

Ontario Landlords Association Partners With Neighbourhood Informational Post (NIP) And Promotes The Toronto Rent Bank

The Ontario Landlords Association is happy to partner with NIP.  NIP is a non-for-profit organization funded by the government to support and help develop the local community, and  hold multiple programs that supports the individuals and households with low income.

Toronto Rent Bank

One of the programs offered by NIP is the Toronto Rent Bank.

Toronto Rent Bank is an interest free loan that helps individuals and or household with low income to pay their rent and avoid eviction due to short-term financial difficulties.

NIP found that the demand for this program is raising over the years, however, the application we receive has been decreasing.

They assume this to be related to the limited number of people they are currently exposed to, therefore they want to seek if related organizations are willing to support them and expand this service to support more people.

More About NIP And the Toronto Rent Bank

In 1969, a group of community residents founded Neighbourhood Information Post because they wanted to ensure that low-income individuals and households had access to information and resources, so that they could be empowered to improve the quality of their own lives.

Four decades later, from helping local community members and newcomers access resources, supporting the development of community leaders and volunteers, to providing financial assistance and housing support to people throughout the City of Toronto, NIP remains a vital agency in the eastern downtown core in Toronto.

TORONTO RENT BANK PROGRAM

The Toronto Rent Bank Program provides interest-free repayable loans to low-income households facing eviction due to short-term financial difficulties.  It is a successful collaboration between Neighbourhood Information Post (NIP) and our partner agencies:  Albion Neighbourhood ServicesCOSTI North York Housing HelpEast York Housing Help, The Housing Help Centre, The Neighbourhood Organization, Unison Health and Community Services.

NIP acts as the Central Administrative agency as well as a local service access centre in this city-wide homelessness prevention program.  NIP is responsible for processing all Rent Bank loans and repayments in Toronto, as well as providing local residents in the Downtown area with Rent Bank intake functions and a variety of housing-related services.

Tenants may be eligible if:

  • you are living in Toronto with legal status in Canada

  • you have steady and ongoing source of income (within low-income guidelines)

  • you currently receive income through social assistance (OW / ODSP) or OSAP plus additional income; special rules apply* (*Please contact your local office for more information)

  • your rental unit is covered by provincial tenant legislation (RTA) and you are paying market rent

  • you can provide documentation required by the Rent Bank application process and satisfy all other program requirements

Landlords Can Benefit From This Program Too!

No small landlord wants to evict a good tenant who is having temporary financial troubles.  The problem is most small landlords are also struggling!

We need rent or we can’t cover our mortgage and won’t be able to continue to be a landlord. We aren’t huge corporate landlords with economies of scale and private legal teams.

Landlords can let our tenants know about the Rent Bank Program and help them succeed to help you succeed.

TORONTO RENT BANK CENTRAL OFFICE

Contact Information: 416-924-2543 or torontorentbank@nipost.org

We Want Win-Win Business Relationships With Tenants

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2019

A Landlord Reveals Her Goals To Tenants

Dear Tenant,

I am an a person who invested in an Ontario property. This makes me an Ontario “landlord”. The term “landlord” has a lot of negativity. It brings back memories of British Lords with castles and ripping off working class people. 

That’s not me.  I work two jobs and have a mortgage. My one rental property is nicer than my own house I live in. My car has over 200,000 kms on it and is 12 years old.

So please call me an Ontario “housing provider” or an Ontario “resident who wants to be a great owner of a property people rent from me.”

This open letter to you is to share information so that we can be a team.

After all, you need me, and I need you. 

Let’s be partners in this venture, working together for both sides to succeed!

1. I am not getting rich on this venture.

In fact, for the first 12-18 months of me buying this property, I am going to lose money. Even then, this duplex/triplex that you are living in will net me approx $200-$300 per month after all expenses have been paid. Doing the math, I believe that works out to $2,400-$3,600 per year.

At some point in time, I hope that this property gains value, and I can sell it for more that I bought it. It’s a great concept that you could work towards in your lifetime – if you are so inclined.

Until then, you need a place to live, and I need a tenant.

2. Please take care of our property.

It’s your home, but it’s my house.

If I know that you will keep your home in decent condition, I will be much more motivated to ask you to help me pick out a colour next time I paint the walls, or replace the carpet.

Please don’t be a don’t be a bad tenant who thinks I’m some kind of super rich predator sucking you you dry and spending your rent on Ferrari’s and caviar.

3. I promise to respect you and your personal rights.

I will give you all the notice I can before I have to enter your apartment. After all, this is your home, but it’s my house. If I need to replace a toilet, or fix something, I will give you advanced notice.

I hope the respect will be mutual. After all, it’s the little things that count. If we can all get along, we will both enjoy working with each other. I am not here to mess with your life.

4. I was you once, perhaps you will be me one day.

I know what it’s like to rent. I know what it’s like to be a tenant. It’s actually a decent way to live.

I never worried about the roof, the plumbing, needing a new stove, or fridge, or even if the carpet was getting worn down and needed replacing.

I never worried if the city increased utilities, or taxes – I paid a flat rent, which can only increase by a very small amount each year. I let my landlord worry and take care of all of that.

You need me, and I need you. If neither one of us are jerks, this will work out just fine.

Sincerely,

Ms. Ontario Landlord

Discuss this at the Ontario Landlord forums