Archive for the ‘tenant rights’ Category

Good Tenant Tips: A Place For Good Tenants To Share Helpful Advice

Friday, October 21st, 2022

Tenants Speak Out & Share Their Concerns & Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited our tenant members to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

 

Ontario Landlords Have More Rights Than California, USA Landlords! Yes, USA!

Friday, October 21st, 2022

 

Thank you for accepting my submission as a volunteer.  This is just my opinion based on comparing different areas and how Tenants are treated.

Landlords in Ontario continue to claim things such as “Tenants have all the rights”, “The system isn’t fair” and “Landlords have no rights.”

This is not true.

The real problems Ontario landlords face is not the ‘system’, it’s their lack of professionalism. 

Sorry…in the Western nations Tenants have rights! Be professional and you don’t have any problems!

From not screening properly to not being fair to their Tenants to not bothering to train and view being a landlord as a job and not just sit back and take the money.

—“If you don’t treat small landlords right no one will invest.”

—Meanwhile there is MASSIVE and HUGE rental investment in Ontario rental properties in 2022.

I’m going to show you a clear example.

Ontario Landlords Have More Rights Than California, USA Landlords! Yes, USA!

And it’s an important example as many Canadians think they are more ‘fair’ and ‘gentle’ compared to Americans.

It’s simply not true.

California Offers Real Protection For Tenants: Tenants Who Didn’t Pay Rent Between March 1, 2020 ad September 30, 2021 Cannot Be Evicted!

Smart and handsome California governor Newsom really knows how to protect Tenants.

Did you know in California this is the PERMANENT law:

State law permanently protects residential tenants from eviction if they were unable to pay rent due between March 1, 2020 and September 30, 2021 because of COVID-19-related lost income or increased expenses.

All Tenants have to do:

To be protected, tenants must return a declaration that their landlord must give them along with any eviction notice seeking collection of this rent.

California Is Very Clear To Protect Tenants And Their Rights

Can a landlord pursue back rent through an eviction process even though the landlord has also obtained relief or compensation from another source?

No. The eviction moratorium prohibits a landlord from using the eviction process to recover delayed rent if the landlord has already been compensated for the unpaid rent through federal or state government relief funds or other programs that provide such compensation.

Does the moratorium provide tenants with any affirmative defenses if a landlord files an eviction lawsuit against the tenant, in violation of the moratorium?

Yes.  The moratorium grants an affirmative defense that may be raised at any time in an eviction lawsuit (also known as an unlawful detainer action) if a landlord files the lawsuit in violation of the moratorium.

The moratorium says that “a landlord may not deceive a tenant in connection with . . . this Order.” What does that mean?

A landlord cannot intentionally or carelessly provide false information about the protections provided by the moratorium, or what the moratorium requires landlords or tenants to do. Providing incomplete information could also be a violation.

What should a tenant do if a landlord serves an eviction notice, files an eviction lawsuit against the tenant, or provides false or misleading information, in violation of the moratorium?

Tenants can complain to the City Attorney’s Office if landlords don’t comply with the moratorium. If informal efforts to get the landlord to rescind notices fail, the City may issue a fine of $1,000 or file a lawsuit. Also, the tenant or the City can sue the landlord for violations the Tenant Harassment Ordinance. The maximum civil penalty for a violation of the Tenant Harassment Ordinance has been increased from $10,000 to $15,000 during the emergency.

https://www.santamonica.gov/coronavirus-eviction-moratorium

Residential Eviction Protections for Non-Payment of Rent

Los Angeles County Eviction Moratorium: For rent due from July 1, 2022 through December 31, 2022, tenants whose household income is at or below 80 percent Area Median Income are protected from eviction for nonpayment of rent, if they certify their income and inability to pay due to financial impacts related to COVID-19. To be protected, tenants must provide notice to their landlord within 7 days of rent is due, every month that rent is due. This program was enacted by and is administered by the County of Los Angeles. For more information, please visit https://dcba.lacounty.gov/noevictions/ or call 800-593-8222.

State law permanently protects residential tenants from eviction if they were unable to pay rent due between March 1, 2020 and September 30, 2021 because of COVID-19-related lost income or increased expenses. To be protected, tenants must return a declaration that their landlord must give them along with any eviction notice seeking collection of this rent. Even if a tenant has already provided a declaration each month, they should return this declaration as well. State law says that tenants must have paid 25 percent of rent due for September 2020 – September 2021 by September 30, 2021 in order to be protected. However, tenants who did not pay 25 percent may still be protected from eviction if they apply for state rent relief or their applications for state rent relief are pending. Residential tenants can call the Legal Aid Foundation at (800) 399-4529 for more information.

State law also prohibits a court from issuing a summons in an eviction case for rent owed through March 31, 2022 unless the landlord declares under penalty of perjury that he or she applied for government rental assistance and was rejected; and provides a copy of the final rejection. This prohibition expires on June 30, 2022.

Even after March 31, 2022, tenants who can pay all the rent owed with the help of rental assistance now have more time to pay to avoid eviction. Tenants can contest or overturn an eviction at any time prior to leaving if they can show that with approved assistance and their own funds (if needed) they can pay all the rent owed. Tenants can do so even after getting a court ruling against them. This protection only applies if the rent was owed between March 1, 2020 and March 31, 2022 and the tenancy began before October 1, 2021.

Protections against evictions for reasons other than nonpayment of rent have also been extended. On June 29, 2022, The City extended the following protections until December 31, 2022*:

  • Protections against “no-fault” evictions, including owner-occupancies;
  • Protections against evictions for nuisance, with limited exceptions for health and safety concerns, or for unauthorized occupants or pets;
  • Owners may serve requisite notices for an Ellis Act eviction, but shall not file an eviction based on removal of a unit from the market under the Ellis Act until 60 days after December 31, 2022.

Special protections against eviction for refusing non-emergency entries were not extended and are no longer in effect. Landlords must still comply with California law regarding entries, including entering only for specific reasons and providing reasonable notice.

*If the County Health Office Order is terminated, or the City does not ratify the need for a continuing local emergency every 60 days, the protections would end prior to December 31, 2022.

Los Angeles County extended protections against eviction for nuisances, unauthorized occupants and animals, and certain owner-occupancies through December 31, 2022, but did not extend protections for denying entry to landlords beyond May 31, 2022. Where protections are provided by Los Angeles County and the City of Santa Monica, the stronger protection applies. You can find more information at https://dcba.lacounty.gov/noevictions/

International Students Be Careful Of Rental Scams

Friday, September 2nd, 2022

Coming to a new land can be exciting. There can also be dangers. So be happy, be positive but always be careful.

For example, be aware there are lots of “rental scams” happening in Ontario.

This has nothing to do with real landlords, but people who act as the landlord when they aren’t!

According to CBC news an international student at the University of Waterloo in Ontario says she was eager to settle into new housing ahead of the fall semester, but was stripped of her savings and is fighting poor mental health after falling victim to a rental scam.

The victim is Armina Soleymani who moved from Iran to Ontario 3 years ago to get her Doctorate degree.

She says:

“Before, I had one problem: Finding a place. But now, I have two problems: Finding a place and getting my money back … I can’t focus on my studies.”

Soleymani’s experience comes following a slew of warnings by the Waterloo Regional Police Service, and as officers confirm they’re probing multiple reports of rental fraud in the university area this month.

Soleymani said she began searching for a new rental unit near the university about two months ago in order to secure a place before her current lease expires Aug. 31.

How The Rental Scam Works

Earlier this month, she found an online listing from someone calling themself a tenant through a Facebook group that’s popular among students. The woman said she wanted to sublet a unit at a building on Columbia Street West in Waterloo. Soleymani arranged an in-person appointment to meet with the woman on Aug. 6.

Soleymani said the woman, who claimed she was a student, gave her a tour of the furnished unit, and then they signed a lease agreement.

She said the woman requested that Soleymani pay $2,000 in cash to cover first and last month’s rent and a key deposit.

“I got suspicious and asked her for her ID,” said Soleymani. “I asked her to come down in front of the building’s main entrance door where there were two security cameras and I paid her.”

Soleymani said the woman gave her a key, which turned out to be fake, and was told it would work on the move-in day, so there was no opportunity to try it out beforehand to see if it would gain her access to the building.

Soleymani also said she kept in touch with the woman through Facebook, but after a few days, she noticed the woman’s Facebook page had been deleted. When Soleymani went to check on the unit, she happened upon a building manager, who advised her she had been scammed by the woman and there were other victims.

From what Soleymani understands, the woman didn’t actually live there. She also understands, based on what the building manager told her, that the woman had been subletting the unit herself from another person who was subletting it.

Soleymani said she believes scammers go out of their way to target international students or those scrambling to find a place weeks before school.

“During this time, students are desperate, they just want to find a place,” she said. “I think right now I realize several [red] flags, but I was under the pressure of finding a place. When your priority is to protect yourself from being homeless, you can’t focus on other things.

“There are lots of international students … that are looking for a place with no success … We have no choice other than to trust people and I know for many other students who come from overseas, there’s no choice but using online applications,” she added, noting language barriers also make the process more challenging.

Soleymani said the situation has impacted her mental health, and left her unable to focus on her studies and research. She hopes her story will raise awareness and help others.

“I just want to warn the other students. I don’t want anyone to experience the same situation.”

How You Can Protect Yourself and Your Money!
According to the University of Toronto you can protect yourself in the following ways

The Tragic Murder Of Tenant Al Gosling After Being Evicted By His Landlord

Tuesday, February 8th, 2022

One old man died. Shame on us

Al Gosling died this past weekend; there was, finally, nothing his doctors could do and no more medicines to help, and so the machines that kept him alive were shut down.

Al’s friend, Harry Kopyto, was by his side when he died. Harry said, “I tried to reach him. I shouted in his ear. I held his hand. I hugged him. There were so many tubes and monitors. Who knows if he heard me?”

Farewell, old friend.

Now let me be blunt: old men die all the time – and Al was 82 years old – but I wonder if he would have died like this had he not been evicted by his landlord!

Let me remind you:

Al came home one day some months ago and found that the lock on the door of his bachelor apartment had been changed.

With nowhere to go, he slept for a week under the stairs in the building that had been his home. He went from the stairs to a shelter, where it seems he picked up an infection. He went from the shelter to a clinic and, finally, he went to the hospital, and his last bed.

From there to the grave.

Al was a long-term tenant.. In recent years, he may have had some trouble with his rent. I suspect the trouble was bureaucratic.

According to the landlord, Al neglected to fill out his annual declaration of income a couple of years in a row; the declaration is a requirement if your rent is geared to income. In the absence of such a valuable declaration, The landlord hit Al with market rent and he ran up arrears and was threatened with eviction.

The landlord says they tried to get through to Al, to reason with him. I am no judge of what they did or did not do. All I know is that, in the end, they threw him out.

Who cares?

You and I pay taxes. Our taxes fund social housing. That means you and I are the landlord, and Al Gosling was evicted in our name.

You might argue that the threat of eviction is a way to get an old man to the table, in order to reach a mediated settlement. I can argue just as easily that, for want of a piece of paper, Al Gosling was kicked onto the street.

The landlord says it has an eviction prevention policy; if so, why was Al Gosling evicted? And why is the landlord still serving eviction notices to other tenants, some of whom have special needs?

Is the landlord using the Landlord and Tenant Board as an instrument of social work? If so, I am disgusted.

There were several of the so-called helping professions on the fringes of this case; where were they when it mattered?

Was there no one person with the skills, the heart, the imagination, the initiative, the persistence or the ingenuity to find out if Al needed care, or intervention, or some simple human contact?

Here’s what I think: when many different people are responsible for a problem, no one is responsible for the problem.

I can’t think of one problem solved by kicking an old man onto the street.

I also wonder where Al picked up the infection that made him so ill? If it was in the shelter, how many others have fallen ill there? And would Al have picked up the infection that killed him if he had been allowed to remain in his home?

One last question:

How many other Al Goslings are there in our midst? We need answers. We need a public inquiry.

 

The Nov. 30/2020 Change To the RTA Is KEY! Tenants Can Demand “In Person” LTB Hearings! “Online Hearings” Are Unfair And Break Your Human Rights!

Wednesday, January 6th, 2021

Tenants Can Now LEGALLY DEMAND  Illegal “In Person” LTB Hearings To Avoid the Unfair, Unlawful, Illegitimate “On-Line Hearings!”

Protect Your Human Rights! Here Is How You Can Do It

Tenant heroes are fighting hard to physically stop evictions and have all the right intentions. The problem is this isn’t working and tenants need a new strategy.

Comrades from all over Ontario need to begin focusing on legal and political tactics to protect us from the evil forces that want to kill us all. We need to use legal loop-holes now and then focus on changing the government using the state (and the bureaucracy and the police) for our goals.

With the power of the state in our grasp we can use the state as our weapon, and not Ford’s weapon.

It may seem weird that the best advice for tenants is found on the biggest small landlords site. This is because they allow us to post without censorship.

The Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board is now having “Online Hearings”. These hearings are horrific and unfair and have made the Landlord and Tenant Board an “eviction factory”.

They also break the Ontario Human Rights Code For Landlords And Tenants.

Online Hearings Are Designed To Take Away Your Legal Rights And Evict You! This Isn’t The “Canadian Way” And It’s Illegal!

A recent story on CP24 news said that with the Landlord and Tenant Board “Online Hearings” tenants are show no mercy and act so fast to evict you they don’t even allow you to assert your human rights!

‘People are being shown no mercy,’ advocates warn in Ontario’s online-only tenancy hearings

According to the news experts stated: “It’s bad enough in normal times for people to lose their homes and to be treated unfairly an administrative proceeding. But it can be life or death in the kind of situation we’re in now,

The Online Hearings Are Not Fair and Not Right!

The experts continued: “the shift to an online-only hearing model has made it harder for tenants to present their circumstances or access legal advice, including through ACTO’s duty counsel program.”

Lawyers must now introduce themselves to tenants in the virtual session, in front of all other participants, and both need to exit the meeting to speak privately.

Tenant lawyers are entering “chaotic” hearing situations where they struggle to make themselves heard.

NDP Housing Critic Says Online Hearings Leading To Human Rights Violations And Must Stop!

Amazing NDP Housing Critic and Future Housing Minister Suze Morrison, who introduced the motion, said the online hearing format isn’t accessible for people with visual impairments or those who don’t have stable internet access, among other challenges. Evictions must stop because of this unfairness.

“I’m deeply concerned that there are human rights violations happening here,” Morrison said 

But it goes beyond mercy and goes to breaking the law!!

Let’s look at just a couple of the abuses here! Canada isn’t a “banana republic” but LTB “online hearings” are!

What’s Wrong With Online Hearings? Take A Look At This Corruption! With Online Hearings You Have No Rights. 

Look at this goofball destroying lives:

 

 

Tenants Can Demand “In Person” Hearings To Protect Your Human Rights (The LTB Doesn’t Want You To Know This!)

A very important change happened on November 30, 2020 that the Heroic Tenant Fighters have not been fully aware of and tenants don’t know about!

On November 30, 2020 the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB)  said requests for in-person hearings would be considered on a case-by-case basis to ensure people are accommodated under the Human Rights Code. As of mid-December, Tribunals Ontario had not confirmed if any in-person hearings had been approved.

Let’s take a look at the new rules:

November 30, 2020

Updated Practice Direction on Hearing Formats

Effective November 30, 2020, Tribunals Ontario has an updated Practice Direction on Hearing Formats. The Practice Direction outlines Tribunals Ontario’s approach to determining the format of the hearing that will be held, and how a party can request a different hearing format.The updated Practice Direction is part of Tribunals Ontario’s digital transformation to enhance the quality of dispute resolution services while meeting the diverse needs of Ontarians. The digital-first approach will continue even when the pandemic is over.

“Our approach to digital first is to create more convenient, accessible and timely access to justice but it’s not digital only. We are ensuring people who need a different hearing format are supported when they need it.” said Sean Weir, Executive Chair at Tribunals Ontario.

Matters will be scheduled for video, telephone or written proceedings unless a different format is required as an accommodation for an Ontario Human Rights Code-related need, or unless a party can establish that the specified hearing format will result in an unfair hearing.

All Tribunals Ontario’s hearing centres are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Currently, a party can contact the tribunal to make a request for an in-person proceeding. The tribunal will determine whether the matter will proceed in a different hearing format or whether it will proceed as an in-person proceeding. Tribunals Ontario will schedule limited in-person events when we are able to do so safely.

When in-person proceedings are available, Tribunals Ontario’s hearing centres will adhere to strict health and safety measures to protect staff, adjudicators and Ontarians. More details about safety protocols at hearing centres will be provided later this winter.

Tribunals Ontario is committed to providing fair, effective and timely dispute resolution services to the people of Ontario.

Read more here.

 

 

Tenants Have Human Rights In Ontario, But You Must Demand Your Rights

Ontario landlords must obey the Ontario Human Rights Code For Landlords and Tenants

Tribunals Ontario is committed to providing fair, effective and timely dispute resolution services to the people of Ontario

Housing is a human right

International law says that people in Canada should be able to get good housing that they can afford. To help achieve this in Ontario, tenants and landlords (or housing providers) have rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code.

Under the Code, everyone has the right to equal treatment in housing without discrimination and harassment. As a landlord, you are responsible for making sure the housing you operate is free from discrimination and harassment.

People cannot be refused an apartment, bothered by a landlord or other tenants, or otherwise treated unfairly because of their:

  • race, colour or ethnic background
  • religious beliefs or practices
  • ancestry, including people of Aboriginal descent
  • place of origin
  • citizenship, including refugee status
  • sex (including pregnancy and gender identity)
  • family status
  • marital status, including people with a same-sex partner
  • disability
  • sexual orientation
  • age, including people who are 16 or 17 years old and no longer living with their parents
  • receipt of public assistance.

People are also protected if they face discrimination because of being a friend or relative of someone identified above.

Where do housing rights apply?

The right to equal treatment without discrimination applies when renting or buying a unit (for example, in a high rise apartment, condo, co-op or house). This right also applies to choosing or evicting tenants, occupancy rules and regulations, repairs, the use of related services and facilities, and the general enjoyment of the premises.

As a landlord or housing provider, you are one of the people responsible for making sure tenants’ human rights are respected. Government legislators, policy makers, planners and program designers, tribunals and courts must also make sure their activities, strategies and decisions address discrimination issues in housing.

Choosing tenants

The Code says what business practices are acceptable and what information you may ask for when choosing tenants:

  • Rental history, credit references and/or credit checks may be requested. A lack of rental or credit history should not be viewed negatively.
  • You can ask for income information, but you must also ask for and consider it together with any available information on rental history, credit references and credit checks (such as through Equifax Canada).
  • You can only consider income information on its own when no other information is made available.
  • You can only use income information to confirm the person has enough income to cover the rent. Unless you are providing subsidized housing, it is illegal to apply a rent-to-income ratio such as a 30% cut-off rule.

You can ask for a “guarantor” to sign the lease – but only if you have the same requirements for all tenants, not just for people identified by Code grounds, such as recent immigrants or people receiving social assistance.

Accommodating tenant needs

You have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

When the Code does not apply

The Code does not apply in the case of a disagreement or “personality conflict” with a landlord or another tenant unrelated to a Code ground, or if a tenant shares a bathroom or kitchen with the owner or the owner’s family.

You can advance human rights in housing

Housing providers can take a number of steps to prevent discrimination and harassment and address human rights in rental housing by developing:

  • anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies
  • plans for reviewing and removing barriers
  • procedures for responding to accommodation requests
  • procedures for resolving disputes quickly and effectively
  • education and training programs.

It is important to make sure that organizational rules, policies, procedures, decision-making processes and culture do not create barriers, and do not cause discrimination. Areas where barriers could exist include wait-list and eligibility criteria, and occupancy rules including guest policies and bedroom requirements,

Follow some key human rights principles:

  • design inclusively – which means thinking about people’s possible accommodation needs before you design your building, set up your rules, etc., so that your housing does not cause new barriers
  • identify and remove existing barriers
  • maximize integration – which means setting up housing and programs that are inclusive, where everybody can take part
  • look at the needs of individuals. and consider the best possible solution

 

How You Can Use The New Rules Made On Nov. 30, 2020 And Win!

Remember the Landlord and Tenant Board has clearly stated the following:

“Matters will be scheduled for video, telephone or written proceedings unless a different format is required as an accommodation for an Ontario Human Rights Code-related need, or unless a party can establish that the specified hearing format will result in an unfair hearing.”

This is the loop hole to protect you and your family!

Who Can Demand An “In Person Hearing” Based On Human Rights Rules For Landlords?

Let’s take a look at the rules again:

Accommodating tenant needs

Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

 

Tenants Facing Eviction Need To Go On Offence And Demand “In Person” Landlord And Tenant Board Hearings Based On Your Human Rights!

-Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

-For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

-Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices.

-Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

-You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

-Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

-Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

Tenants Facing Eviction Can Go Offence And Demand “In Person” Landlord And Tenant Board Hearings.

While Online Hearings are unjust, In-Person Hearings are fair and you will have legal rights.

Online Hearings are a trap that will get you evicted and destroyed!

Also, In Person Hearings will be delayed for months so you don’t need to worry about being evicted like cattle being slaughtered to make hamburger.

Find part of the Ontario Human Rights Codes That Fits Your Situation and Demand A Formal, Real “In-Person” Hearing and Win!

File a Tenant Rights T2 Form against your landlord and explain you couldn’t pay rent (or didn’t pay rent) because your landlord broke the Ontario Human Rights Code!

The Human Rights Code won’t be legal if you share a bathroom/kitchen with your landlord or you are just having a “disagreement” with your landlord. So make sure to explain your situation is not just a “disagreement” but the landlord is breaking your Human Rights! This will mean you have the legal right to an “in person” hearing!

Remember, according the Human Rights Codes Landlords MUST ACCOMDATE TENANT NEEDS.

For Example:

1. Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, if you are feeling sick or have an injury  you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

IF THE LANDLORD DIDN’T MAKE THESE CHANGES THEY ARE BREAKING THE ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS CODE.

2. Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell  may need help. 

SO IF YOU WERE SICK OR LOST YOUR JOB AND UNWELL YOUR LANDLORD NEEDS TO MAKE SURE THEY HELP YOU OR THEY ARE BREAKING THE HUMAN RIGHTS CODE.

3. Landlords and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. Landlords must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution.

YOUR LANDLORD MUST BE RESPONSIBLE FOR TRYING TO MAKE YOUR ACCOMMODATION WORK. THEY CAN’T JUST LEGALLY KICK YOU OUT WITHOUT DOING SO.

4. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

YOUR LANDLORD MUST KEEP ALL YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION PRIVATE. THEY CAN’T MAKE BILLBOARDS OR ‘BAD TENANT LISTS’ OR THEY WILL BE FINED

5. Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH YOUR RENTAL (FOR EXAMPLE IT’S TOO EXPENSIVE DURING THE PANDEMIC) YOUR LANDLORD MUST HAVE TRIED TO OVER YOU INTERIM ACCOMMOCATION.

There Is An Eviction Blitz And The Landlords Are Paper Tigers Who Are Getting Easy Evictions ONLY Because of Corrupt On-Line Hearings! Only A Corrupt Fascist Gov’t With Massive Foreign Funding Is Causing People To Be Evicted And Suffering!

Fight Back And Get Your In Person Hearing And Avoid Being Evicted Due To Banana-Republic Style Corruption And Political Manipulation

When ideology clashed with opportunism, Lenin invariably chose the tactical path above doctrinal purity https://www.historyextra.com/period/20th-century/vladimir-lenin-who-power-rise-how-russian-revolution/

Tenant Groups We Know The On-Line LTB Hearings Are Corrupt. Ford Won’t Fix Them! We Must Help Every Tenant Get An In-Person Hearing NOW! When We Control The State We Can Defund The Sheriff Instead Of Fighting On Their Fascist Terms! Do It!