Archive for the ‘tenant rights’ Category

Tenants Are Preparing A MASSIVE Class Action Lawsuit Because Tenants Are Being Treated Unfairly, LTB Is A Puppet Of Landlords, We Need To Be Compensated For The Lies of March 2020!

Friday, July 30th, 2021

Tenants Were Provided with Bad Faith Advice From Ford In March 2020! The LTB and Landlords Have Abused This Bad Faith Advice To Trample Tenant Rights!

We Will Be Compensated By Both Ford And The Landlords Who Have Used This Bad Faith To Evict Tenants And Destroyed Lives!

Call To Action TENANTS!

We have been reaching out to Tenants to explain to them how to really handle bad landlords for maximum winning. Protests and “uniting together” physically is useful but not the ultimate nuclear bomb we need.

Landlords can just hire security, wait us out, and use our rent money to hire people to harass us.

You need to hit landlords in what is the only thing they care about: their money and their feeling they are superior and untouchable!

And how do you do it?

Make them pay fees and make them personally responsible!

You file a class action lawsuit against the owners of your rental building!

Stop feeling intimidated, stop being depressed, and fight back and win! Yes, you have power they don’t want you to know you have!

Be aggressive and put your landlord/building owner on the Stand in Court where they cannot lie or they will have a criminal charge of perjury! This is their nightmare!

Time For Justice! We Will Now Stop Begging For Fairness And Put The Ontario Government and The Landlord and Tenant Board On Trial!

In March 2020 Premier Doug Ford said tenants don’t have to pay rent if they can’t afford to.

Now, over a year later, tenants are being evicted just for following the order from Premier Ford.

He set us up.

He lied.

All so-called landlord claims will lose as the situation now is worse for Tenants than ever before

The key step that showed their actions was deleting all the “LTB interpretations” on the LTB website…meaning all former interpretations of the rules at the LTB were “vanished” and replaced with pro-landlord pablum!

Meanwhile the LTB continued to grovel to the powerful landlord interests. It so not only pathetic, it shows the LTB has become biased against Tenants since the pandemic began!

This is unfair and unacceptable! And we will prove in in the courts!

Tenants across Ontario are working with legal aid clinics to provide strategic assistance and to deliver a notice letter to The Province of Ontario pertaining to compensation for the financial losses of TENANTS and to make immediate changes to the unfair Residential Tenancies Act failing which legal action will be contemplated to provide fairness to TENANTS.

Fundraising for the legal costs begins SOON.

TENANTS have suffered immense and unpublicized losses due to the Government’s unilateral decision to close the LTB and clog the redress process by banning Tenant legal complaints about harassment, abuse, and lack of maintaining our homes.

All this unilaterally decided by the Government without any compensation to TENANTS.

The Government has repeatedly said  “We remain committed to providing fair, effective and timely access to justice”.

For TENANTS, it hasn’t been fair, it hasn’t been effective and there certainly hasn’t been timely access to justice.

TENANTS are seeking restitution and compensation for millions in rental losses due to no fault of their own retroactive to March 1, 2020.

Tenants Are Being Evicted Without Fair Process

Contract law is not being adhered to and this reflects a direct bias to us.

Additionally, we are not afforded the same legal rights as other contract holders, access to justice or access to the criminal laws. No other category is denied these rights.

No person can enter a grocery store and get kicked out just because it can take a couple of minutes to pull our debit cards.

Once COVID hit and the Provincial Government placed a moratorium on evictions, TENANTS faced extreme financial hardship.

The Government released a financial package for every group impacted by the pandemic: commercial landlords, students, big corporations, airlines, NGOs, unemployed, farmers, non profits, artists, civil servants etc….BUT NOT TENANTS!

Doug Ford Lied And The Landlord Tenant Board Is Trampling On Tenant Rights

NO COMPENSATION WAS PROVIDED FOR TENANTS AFTER PREMIER FORD SAID WE DON’T HAVE TO PAY RENT!

And the messaging from our Ontario Premier, very early into the pandemic, was that if rent could not be paid then the tenant would not need to pay the rent owed and the Provincial Government would not make these same tenants face eviction.

This was a lie and this lie has cause billions of dollars in damages and lives destroyed!

The LTB was already being investigated by the Ombudsman of Ontario, due to the increasingly lengthy delays in Tenants obtaining a hearing for anything from damages to property, non payment of rent, illegal activities in the rental property, etc.

But this failed.

We need your financial support. This is a call to action. It’s time to stop the bias towards TENANTS.

Tenants have reached out to legal clinics to provide strategic assistance to The Province of Ontario pertaining to compensation for the financial losses of TENANTSW and to make immediate changes to the RTA failing which legal action will be contemplated to provide fairness to TENANTS.
The funds will be used in an attempt to resolve the following concerns:
  • – compensation for TENANT arrears
  • – immediate changes to the residential tenancy act to help TENANTS
  • – a public online database of LANDLORD rental history
  • – prosecute repeat LANDLORD offenders
  • – grant more powers to the police for disputes at rental properties

If you are wondering what a class action lawsuit is, you’re not alone.

Class action lawsuits tend to be highly complex, and they require an experienced lawyer at the helm. The actual definition of a class action, though, is fairly simple: in a class action, a person or group of people sues on behalf of a large group of people who all suffered the same legal injury.

For example, someone could file a class action suit on behalf of everyone who:

  • Was billed for the same unauthorized charges
  • Saw the same false ads before paying for a product or service
  • Bought the same defective product
  • Suffered losses from investing in the same security
  • Paid too much for a product or service because of the same anticompetitive conduct

The person who starts the lawsuit is called the named plaintiff or class representative. The people proposed to be represented are called the class members. Class action lawsuits typically include hundreds or thousands of class members.

If you are having problems with a company—whether it’s a website, a company you invested in, or even your employer OR YOUR LANDLORD—many other people may be having the same problems.

In these situations, a class action suit is often the best solution because it can allow many people across the country to benefit from a single lawsuit. It also empowers individuals who may otherwise lack a means of speaking out to stand up against a powerful company in court.

Any injured person can initiate a class action suit, but specific requirements apply. Below we outline the class action requirements and what you can expect as a class member or a class representative.

This is a call to action. It’s time to stop the bias and unfair government attacks on TENANTS. 
It’s time Tenants put Ford, Clark and the LTB on the stand, under oath, to seek the Truth!
We will win!

The Tragic Murder Of Tenant Al Gosling After Being Evicted By His Landlord

Thursday, July 8th, 2021

One old man died. Shame on us

Al Gosling died this past weekend; there was, finally, nothing his doctors could do and no more medicines to help, and so the machines that kept him alive were shut down.

Al’s friend, Harry Kopyto, was by his side when he died. Harry said, “I tried to reach him. I shouted in his ear. I held his hand. I hugged him. There were so many tubes and monitors. Who knows if he heard me?”

Farewell, old friend.

Now let me be blunt: old men die all the time – and Al was 82 years old – but I wonder if he would have died like this had he not been evicted by his landlord!

Let me remind you:

Al came home one day some months ago and found that the lock on the door of his bachelor apartment had been changed.

With nowhere to go, he slept for a week under the stairs in the building that had been his home. He went from the stairs to a shelter, where it seems he picked up an infection. He went from the shelter to a clinic and, finally, he went to the hospital, and his last bed.

From there to the grave.

Al was a long-term tenant.. In recent years, he may have had some trouble with his rent. I suspect the trouble was bureaucratic.

According to the landlord, Al neglected to fill out his annual declaration of income a couple of years in a row; the declaration is a requirement if your rent is geared to income. In the absence of such a valuable declaration, The landlord hit Al with market rent and he ran up arrears and was threatened with eviction.

The landlord says they tried to get through to Al, to reason with him. I am no judge of what they did or did not do. All I know is that, in the end, they threw him out.

Who cares?

You and I pay taxes. Our taxes fund social housing. That means you and I are the landlord, and Al Gosling was evicted in our name.

You might argue that the threat of eviction is a way to get an old man to the table, in order to reach a mediated settlement. I can argue just as easily that, for want of a piece of paper, Al Gosling was kicked onto the street.

The landlord says it has an eviction prevention policy; if so, why was Al Gosling evicted? And why is the landlord still serving eviction notices to other tenants, some of whom have special needs?

Is the landlord using the Landlord and Tenant Board as an instrument of social work? If so, I am disgusted.

There were several of the so-called helping professions on the fringes of this case; where were they when it mattered?

Was there no one person with the skills, the heart, the imagination, the initiative, the persistence or the ingenuity to find out if Al needed care, or intervention, or some simple human contact?

Here’s what I think: when many different people are responsible for a problem, no one is responsible for the problem.

I can’t think of one problem solved by kicking an old man onto the street.

I also wonder where Al picked up the infection that made him so ill? If it was in the shelter, how many others have fallen ill there? And would Al have picked up the infection that killed him if he had been allowed to remain in his home?

One last question:

How many other Al Goslings are there in our midst? We need answers. We need a public inquiry.

 

The Nov. 30/2020 Change To the RTA Is KEY! Tenants Can Demand “In Person” LTB Hearings! “Online Hearings” Are Unfair And Break Your Human Rights!

Wednesday, January 6th, 2021

Tenants Can Now LEGALLY DEMAND  Illegal “In Person” LTB Hearings To Avoid the Unfair, Unlawful, Illegitimate “On-Line Hearings!”

Protect Your Human Rights! Here Is How You Can Do It

Tenant heroes are fighting hard to physically stop evictions and have all the right intentions. The problem is this isn’t working and tenants need a new strategy.

Comrades from all over Ontario need to begin focusing on legal and political tactics to protect us from the evil forces that want to kill us all. We need to use legal loop-holes now and then focus on changing the government using the state (and the bureaucracy and the police) for our goals.

With the power of the state in our grasp we can use the state as our weapon, and not Ford’s weapon.

It may seem weird that the best advice for tenants is found on the biggest small landlords site. This is because they allow us to post without censorship.

The Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board is now having “Online Hearings”. These hearings are horrific and unfair and have made the Landlord and Tenant Board an “eviction factory”.

They also break the Ontario Human Rights Code For Landlords And Tenants.

Online Hearings Are Designed To Take Away Your Legal Rights And Evict You! This Isn’t The “Canadian Way” And It’s Illegal!

A recent story on CP24 news said that with the Landlord and Tenant Board “Online Hearings” tenants are show no mercy and act so fast to evict you they don’t even allow you to assert your human rights!

‘People are being shown no mercy,’ advocates warn in Ontario’s online-only tenancy hearings

According to the news experts stated: “It’s bad enough in normal times for people to lose their homes and to be treated unfairly an administrative proceeding. But it can be life or death in the kind of situation we’re in now,

The Online Hearings Are Not Fair and Not Right!

The experts continued: “the shift to an online-only hearing model has made it harder for tenants to present their circumstances or access legal advice, including through ACTO’s duty counsel program.”

Lawyers must now introduce themselves to tenants in the virtual session, in front of all other participants, and both need to exit the meeting to speak privately.

Tenant lawyers are entering “chaotic” hearing situations where they struggle to make themselves heard.

NDP Housing Critic Says Online Hearings Leading To Human Rights Violations And Must Stop!

Amazing NDP Housing Critic and Future Housing Minister Suze Morrison, who introduced the motion, said the online hearing format isn’t accessible for people with visual impairments or those who don’t have stable internet access, among other challenges. Evictions must stop because of this unfairness.

“I’m deeply concerned that there are human rights violations happening here,” Morrison said 

But it goes beyond mercy and goes to breaking the law!!

Let’s look at just a couple of the abuses here! Canada isn’t a “banana republic” but LTB “online hearings” are!

What’s Wrong With Online Hearings? Take A Look At This Corruption! With Online Hearings You Have No Rights. 

Look at this goofball destroying lives:

 

 

Tenants Can Demand “In Person” Hearings To Protect Your Human Rights (The LTB Doesn’t Want You To Know This!)

A very important change happened on November 30, 2020 that the Heroic Tenant Fighters have not been fully aware of and tenants don’t know about!

On November 30, 2020 the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB)  said requests for in-person hearings would be considered on a case-by-case basis to ensure people are accommodated under the Human Rights Code. As of mid-December, Tribunals Ontario had not confirmed if any in-person hearings had been approved.

Let’s take a look at the new rules:

November 30, 2020

Updated Practice Direction on Hearing Formats

Effective November 30, 2020, Tribunals Ontario has an updated Practice Direction on Hearing Formats. The Practice Direction outlines Tribunals Ontario’s approach to determining the format of the hearing that will be held, and how a party can request a different hearing format.The updated Practice Direction is part of Tribunals Ontario’s digital transformation to enhance the quality of dispute resolution services while meeting the diverse needs of Ontarians. The digital-first approach will continue even when the pandemic is over.

“Our approach to digital first is to create more convenient, accessible and timely access to justice but it’s not digital only. We are ensuring people who need a different hearing format are supported when they need it.” said Sean Weir, Executive Chair at Tribunals Ontario.

Matters will be scheduled for video, telephone or written proceedings unless a different format is required as an accommodation for an Ontario Human Rights Code-related need, or unless a party can establish that the specified hearing format will result in an unfair hearing.

All Tribunals Ontario’s hearing centres are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Currently, a party can contact the tribunal to make a request for an in-person proceeding. The tribunal will determine whether the matter will proceed in a different hearing format or whether it will proceed as an in-person proceeding. Tribunals Ontario will schedule limited in-person events when we are able to do so safely.

When in-person proceedings are available, Tribunals Ontario’s hearing centres will adhere to strict health and safety measures to protect staff, adjudicators and Ontarians. More details about safety protocols at hearing centres will be provided later this winter.

Tribunals Ontario is committed to providing fair, effective and timely dispute resolution services to the people of Ontario.

Read more here.

 

 

Tenants Have Human Rights In Ontario, But You Must Demand Your Rights

Ontario landlords must obey the Ontario Human Rights Code For Landlords and Tenants

Tribunals Ontario is committed to providing fair, effective and timely dispute resolution services to the people of Ontario

Housing is a human right

International law says that people in Canada should be able to get good housing that they can afford. To help achieve this in Ontario, tenants and landlords (or housing providers) have rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code.

Under the Code, everyone has the right to equal treatment in housing without discrimination and harassment. As a landlord, you are responsible for making sure the housing you operate is free from discrimination and harassment.

People cannot be refused an apartment, bothered by a landlord or other tenants, or otherwise treated unfairly because of their:

  • race, colour or ethnic background
  • religious beliefs or practices
  • ancestry, including people of Aboriginal descent
  • place of origin
  • citizenship, including refugee status
  • sex (including pregnancy and gender identity)
  • family status
  • marital status, including people with a same-sex partner
  • disability
  • sexual orientation
  • age, including people who are 16 or 17 years old and no longer living with their parents
  • receipt of public assistance.

People are also protected if they face discrimination because of being a friend or relative of someone identified above.

Where do housing rights apply?

The right to equal treatment without discrimination applies when renting or buying a unit (for example, in a high rise apartment, condo, co-op or house). This right also applies to choosing or evicting tenants, occupancy rules and regulations, repairs, the use of related services and facilities, and the general enjoyment of the premises.

As a landlord or housing provider, you are one of the people responsible for making sure tenants’ human rights are respected. Government legislators, policy makers, planners and program designers, tribunals and courts must also make sure their activities, strategies and decisions address discrimination issues in housing.

Choosing tenants

The Code says what business practices are acceptable and what information you may ask for when choosing tenants:

  • Rental history, credit references and/or credit checks may be requested. A lack of rental or credit history should not be viewed negatively.
  • You can ask for income information, but you must also ask for and consider it together with any available information on rental history, credit references and credit checks (such as through Equifax Canada).
  • You can only consider income information on its own when no other information is made available.
  • You can only use income information to confirm the person has enough income to cover the rent. Unless you are providing subsidized housing, it is illegal to apply a rent-to-income ratio such as a 30% cut-off rule.

You can ask for a “guarantor” to sign the lease – but only if you have the same requirements for all tenants, not just for people identified by Code grounds, such as recent immigrants or people receiving social assistance.

Accommodating tenant needs

You have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

When the Code does not apply

The Code does not apply in the case of a disagreement or “personality conflict” with a landlord or another tenant unrelated to a Code ground, or if a tenant shares a bathroom or kitchen with the owner or the owner’s family.

You can advance human rights in housing

Housing providers can take a number of steps to prevent discrimination and harassment and address human rights in rental housing by developing:

  • anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies
  • plans for reviewing and removing barriers
  • procedures for responding to accommodation requests
  • procedures for resolving disputes quickly and effectively
  • education and training programs.

It is important to make sure that organizational rules, policies, procedures, decision-making processes and culture do not create barriers, and do not cause discrimination. Areas where barriers could exist include wait-list and eligibility criteria, and occupancy rules including guest policies and bedroom requirements,

Follow some key human rights principles:

  • design inclusively – which means thinking about people’s possible accommodation needs before you design your building, set up your rules, etc., so that your housing does not cause new barriers
  • identify and remove existing barriers
  • maximize integration – which means setting up housing and programs that are inclusive, where everybody can take part
  • look at the needs of individuals. and consider the best possible solution

 

How You Can Use The New Rules Made On Nov. 30, 2020 And Win!

Remember the Landlord and Tenant Board has clearly stated the following:

“Matters will be scheduled for video, telephone or written proceedings unless a different format is required as an accommodation for an Ontario Human Rights Code-related need, or unless a party can establish that the specified hearing format will result in an unfair hearing.”

This is the loop hole to protect you and your family!

Who Can Demand An “In Person Hearing” Based On Human Rights Rules For Landlords?

Let’s take a look at the rules again:

Accommodating tenant needs

Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

 

Tenants Facing Eviction Need To Go On Offence And Demand “In Person” Landlord And Tenant Board Hearings Based On Your Human Rights!

-Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

-For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

-Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices.

-Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

-You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

-Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

-Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

Tenants Facing Eviction Can Go Offence And Demand “In Person” Landlord And Tenant Board Hearings.

While Online Hearings are unjust, In-Person Hearings are fair and you will have legal rights.

Online Hearings are a trap that will get you evicted and destroyed!

Also, In Person Hearings will be delayed for months so you don’t need to worry about being evicted like cattle being slaughtered to make hamburger.

Find part of the Ontario Human Rights Codes That Fits Your Situation and Demand A Formal, Real “In-Person” Hearing and Win!

File a Tenant Rights T2 Form against your landlord and explain you couldn’t pay rent (or didn’t pay rent) because your landlord broke the Ontario Human Rights Code!

The Human Rights Code won’t be legal if you share a bathroom/kitchen with your landlord or you are just having a “disagreement” with your landlord. So make sure to explain your situation is not just a “disagreement” but the landlord is breaking your Human Rights! This will mean you have the legal right to an “in person” hearing!

Remember, according the Human Rights Codes Landlords MUST ACCOMDATE TENANT NEEDS.

For Example:

1. Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, if you are feeling sick or have an injury  you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

IF THE LANDLORD DIDN’T MAKE THESE CHANGES THEY ARE BREAKING THE ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS CODE.

2. Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell  may need help. 

SO IF YOU WERE SICK OR LOST YOUR JOB AND UNWELL YOUR LANDLORD NEEDS TO MAKE SURE THEY HELP YOU OR THEY ARE BREAKING THE HUMAN RIGHTS CODE.

3. Landlords and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. Landlords must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution.

YOUR LANDLORD MUST BE RESPONSIBLE FOR TRYING TO MAKE YOUR ACCOMMODATION WORK. THEY CAN’T JUST LEGALLY KICK YOU OUT WITHOUT DOING SO.

4. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

YOUR LANDLORD MUST KEEP ALL YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION PRIVATE. THEY CAN’T MAKE BILLBOARDS OR ‘BAD TENANT LISTS’ OR THEY WILL BE FINED

5. Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH YOUR RENTAL (FOR EXAMPLE IT’S TOO EXPENSIVE DURING THE PANDEMIC) YOUR LANDLORD MUST HAVE TRIED TO OVER YOU INTERIM ACCOMMOCATION.

There Is An Eviction Blitz And The Landlords Are Paper Tigers Who Are Getting Easy Evictions ONLY Because of Corrupt On-Line Hearings! Only A Corrupt Fascist Gov’t With Massive Foreign Funding Is Causing People To Be Evicted And Suffering!

Fight Back And Get Your In Person Hearing And Avoid Being Evicted Due To Banana-Republic Style Corruption And Political Manipulation

When ideology clashed with opportunism, Lenin invariably chose the tactical path above doctrinal purity https://www.historyextra.com/period/20th-century/vladimir-lenin-who-power-rise-how-russian-revolution/

Tenant Groups We Know The On-Line LTB Hearings Are Corrupt. Ford Won’t Fix Them! We Must Help Every Tenant Get An In-Person Hearing NOW! When We Control The State We Can Defund The Sheriff Instead Of Fighting On Their Fascist Terms! Do It!

 

I Worked Out A Fair “Win-Win” Payment Plan With My Landlord

Thursday, August 13th, 2020

 

My Landlord Cooperated With Me 

These are difficult times for everyone. So many people are out of work and many have even been fired from their jobs!

The pandemic has changed the world and has hurt so many people.

And with all the schools closed many parents have to try to educate and entertain our children. This is especially tough when we can’t go to parks or playgrounds.

Landlords And Tenants And Paying Rent

As a long term tenant I have paid my rent according to the lease with my landlord all the time.

Now things have changed, the economy has changed, the whole world has changed due to the Corona Virus.

Economic Challenges

We tenants have lost hours, lost jobs, and even lost hope. This is a unique situation we have never seen before.

So How Should Tenants Deal With Their Landlord?

It’s all about being upfront and honest and working together.

Inform Your Landlord Of Your Predicament

Be open and honest with your small landlords because they will care and understand the challenges you face.

Most small landlords are nice people…they don’t want you to move (at least in my case). And they are willing to listen. And they are often flexible to reach a win-win situation.

Also, they don’t want to try to find a new tenant to replace you if possible. They want you to stay and hope you are willing to work with them.

See Things From The Landlords Point of View And Ask Them To See Things From Your Point Of View

Most small landlords are not like the rich corporate landlords living in their castles. They want you to stay and be their client.

They also know that finding another good paying tenant in the current environment will be very difficult and would prefer you to stay.

So it’s entirely possible to ‘work things out’.

Work Out A Payment Plan

I worked out a fair payment plan with my landlords.

Since I only get $2000/month from CERB and my rent is $900/month we agreed I would pay $500/month and I would catch up when the pandemic is over and I can get back to work.

This allows me to have confidence I will keep my home and also gives me $1500 for other things I need in life (and I still don’t need to dip into my savings!)

Working Together…Works!

View your small landlord as a partner in this whole crazy mess of a world.

Your small landlord likely rented themselves or have friends or kids renting so they are on your side. They might even be helping their kids or relative or friend who is renting deal with this situation.

Working Class Tenants Working With Working Class Landlords is Key

Many working class landlords aren’t rich and have bills to pay. They are usually pretty kind and flexible and if you be polite and tell them you want to work things out they will do it.

Make sure you rent from a small working class landlord because you can talk to each other and prepare win-win plans.

Stay Safe and Let’s All Work Together

Friday, June 12th, 2020

There lots of good landlords out there.  The problem is there are even more bad landlords.

These bad landlords either don’t know the laws or know them and don’t care…as they think they can intimidate you.

Fight back….and fight back hard and you can win!  Please read our helpful articles here to help good tenants defeat and punish bad landlords.  Good landlords have nothing to worry about and will be appreciated even more by good tenants.