Archive for the ‘Tenant Problems’ Category

The Nov. 30/2020 Change To the RTA Is KEY! Tenants Can Demand “In Person” LTB Hearings! “Online Hearings” Are Unfair And Break Your Human Rights!

Wednesday, January 6th, 2021

Tenants Can Now LEGALLY DEMAND  Illegal “In Person” LTB Hearings To Avoid the Unfair, Unlawful, Illegitimate “On-Line Hearings!”

Protect Your Human Rights! Here Is How You Can Do It

Tenant heroes are fighting hard to physically stop evictions and have all the right intentions. The problem is this isn’t working and tenants need a new strategy.

Comrades from all over Ontario need to begin focusing on legal and political tactics to protect us from the evil forces that want to kill us all. We need to use legal loop-holes now and then focus on changing the government using the state (and the bureaucracy and the police) for our goals.

With the power of the state in our grasp we can use the state as our weapon, and not Ford’s weapon.

It may seem weird that the best advice for tenants is found on the biggest small landlords site. This is because they allow us to post without censorship.

The Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board is now having “Online Hearings”. These hearings are horrific and unfair and have made the Landlord and Tenant Board an “eviction factory”.

They also break the Ontario Human Rights Code For Landlords And Tenants.

Online Hearings Are Designed To Take Away Your Legal Rights And Evict You! This Isn’t The “Canadian Way” And It’s Illegal!

A recent story on CP24 news said that with the Landlord and Tenant Board “Online Hearings” tenants are show no mercy and act so fast to evict you they don’t even allow you to assert your human rights!

‘People are being shown no mercy,’ advocates warn in Ontario’s online-only tenancy hearings

According to the news experts stated: “It’s bad enough in normal times for people to lose their homes and to be treated unfairly an administrative proceeding. But it can be life or death in the kind of situation we’re in now,

The Online Hearings Are Not Fair and Not Right!

The experts continued: “the shift to an online-only hearing model has made it harder for tenants to present their circumstances or access legal advice, including through ACTO’s duty counsel program.”

Lawyers must now introduce themselves to tenants in the virtual session, in front of all other participants, and both need to exit the meeting to speak privately.

Tenant lawyers are entering “chaotic” hearing situations where they struggle to make themselves heard.

NDP Housing Critic Says Online Hearings Leading To Human Rights Violations And Must Stop!

Amazing NDP Housing Critic and Future Housing Minister Suze Morrison, who introduced the motion, said the online hearing format isn’t accessible for people with visual impairments or those who don’t have stable internet access, among other challenges. Evictions must stop because of this unfairness.

“I’m deeply concerned that there are human rights violations happening here,” Morrison said 

But it goes beyond mercy and goes to breaking the law!!

Let’s look at just a couple of the abuses here! Canada isn’t a “banana republic” but LTB “online hearings” are!

What’s Wrong With Online Hearings? Take A Look At This Corruption! With Online Hearings You Have No Rights. 

Look at this goofball destroying lives:

 

 

Tenants Can Demand “In Person” Hearings To Protect Your Human Rights (The LTB Doesn’t Want You To Know This!)

A very important change happened on November 30, 2020 that the Heroic Tenant Fighters have not been fully aware of and tenants don’t know about!

On November 30, 2020 the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB)  said requests for in-person hearings would be considered on a case-by-case basis to ensure people are accommodated under the Human Rights Code. As of mid-December, Tribunals Ontario had not confirmed if any in-person hearings had been approved.

Let’s take a look at the new rules:

November 30, 2020

Updated Practice Direction on Hearing Formats

Effective November 30, 2020, Tribunals Ontario has an updated Practice Direction on Hearing Formats. The Practice Direction outlines Tribunals Ontario’s approach to determining the format of the hearing that will be held, and how a party can request a different hearing format.The updated Practice Direction is part of Tribunals Ontario’s digital transformation to enhance the quality of dispute resolution services while meeting the diverse needs of Ontarians. The digital-first approach will continue even when the pandemic is over.

“Our approach to digital first is to create more convenient, accessible and timely access to justice but it’s not digital only. We are ensuring people who need a different hearing format are supported when they need it.” said Sean Weir, Executive Chair at Tribunals Ontario.

Matters will be scheduled for video, telephone or written proceedings unless a different format is required as an accommodation for an Ontario Human Rights Code-related need, or unless a party can establish that the specified hearing format will result in an unfair hearing.

All Tribunals Ontario’s hearing centres are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Currently, a party can contact the tribunal to make a request for an in-person proceeding. The tribunal will determine whether the matter will proceed in a different hearing format or whether it will proceed as an in-person proceeding. Tribunals Ontario will schedule limited in-person events when we are able to do so safely.

When in-person proceedings are available, Tribunals Ontario’s hearing centres will adhere to strict health and safety measures to protect staff, adjudicators and Ontarians. More details about safety protocols at hearing centres will be provided later this winter.

Tribunals Ontario is committed to providing fair, effective and timely dispute resolution services to the people of Ontario.

Read more here.

 

 

Tenants Have Human Rights In Ontario, But You Must Demand Your Rights

Ontario landlords must obey the Ontario Human Rights Code For Landlords and Tenants

Tribunals Ontario is committed to providing fair, effective and timely dispute resolution services to the people of Ontario

Housing is a human right

International law says that people in Canada should be able to get good housing that they can afford. To help achieve this in Ontario, tenants and landlords (or housing providers) have rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code.

Under the Code, everyone has the right to equal treatment in housing without discrimination and harassment. As a landlord, you are responsible for making sure the housing you operate is free from discrimination and harassment.

People cannot be refused an apartment, bothered by a landlord or other tenants, or otherwise treated unfairly because of their:

  • race, colour or ethnic background
  • religious beliefs or practices
  • ancestry, including people of Aboriginal descent
  • place of origin
  • citizenship, including refugee status
  • sex (including pregnancy and gender identity)
  • family status
  • marital status, including people with a same-sex partner
  • disability
  • sexual orientation
  • age, including people who are 16 or 17 years old and no longer living with their parents
  • receipt of public assistance.

People are also protected if they face discrimination because of being a friend or relative of someone identified above.

Where do housing rights apply?

The right to equal treatment without discrimination applies when renting or buying a unit (for example, in a high rise apartment, condo, co-op or house). This right also applies to choosing or evicting tenants, occupancy rules and regulations, repairs, the use of related services and facilities, and the general enjoyment of the premises.

As a landlord or housing provider, you are one of the people responsible for making sure tenants’ human rights are respected. Government legislators, policy makers, planners and program designers, tribunals and courts must also make sure their activities, strategies and decisions address discrimination issues in housing.

Choosing tenants

The Code says what business practices are acceptable and what information you may ask for when choosing tenants:

  • Rental history, credit references and/or credit checks may be requested. A lack of rental or credit history should not be viewed negatively.
  • You can ask for income information, but you must also ask for and consider it together with any available information on rental history, credit references and credit checks (such as through Equifax Canada).
  • You can only consider income information on its own when no other information is made available.
  • You can only use income information to confirm the person has enough income to cover the rent. Unless you are providing subsidized housing, it is illegal to apply a rent-to-income ratio such as a 30% cut-off rule.

You can ask for a “guarantor” to sign the lease – but only if you have the same requirements for all tenants, not just for people identified by Code grounds, such as recent immigrants or people receiving social assistance.

Accommodating tenant needs

You have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

When the Code does not apply

The Code does not apply in the case of a disagreement or “personality conflict” with a landlord or another tenant unrelated to a Code ground, or if a tenant shares a bathroom or kitchen with the owner or the owner’s family.

You can advance human rights in housing

Housing providers can take a number of steps to prevent discrimination and harassment and address human rights in rental housing by developing:

  • anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies
  • plans for reviewing and removing barriers
  • procedures for responding to accommodation requests
  • procedures for resolving disputes quickly and effectively
  • education and training programs.

It is important to make sure that organizational rules, policies, procedures, decision-making processes and culture do not create barriers, and do not cause discrimination. Areas where barriers could exist include wait-list and eligibility criteria, and occupancy rules including guest policies and bedroom requirements,

Follow some key human rights principles:

  • design inclusively – which means thinking about people’s possible accommodation needs before you design your building, set up your rules, etc., so that your housing does not cause new barriers
  • identify and remove existing barriers
  • maximize integration – which means setting up housing and programs that are inclusive, where everybody can take part
  • look at the needs of individuals. and consider the best possible solution

 

How You Can Use The New Rules Made On Nov. 30, 2020 And Win!

Remember the Landlord and Tenant Board has clearly stated the following:

“Matters will be scheduled for video, telephone or written proceedings unless a different format is required as an accommodation for an Ontario Human Rights Code-related need, or unless a party can establish that the specified hearing format will result in an unfair hearing.”

This is the loop hole to protect you and your family!

Who Can Demand An “In Person Hearing” Based On Human Rights Rules For Landlords?

Let’s take a look at the rules again:

Accommodating tenant needs

Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

 

Tenants Facing Eviction Need To Go On Offence And Demand “In Person” Landlord And Tenant Board Hearings Based On Your Human Rights!

-Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

-For example, for a tenant with a disability, you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

-Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices.

-Sometimes a tenant who is unwell or who disrupts others (either because of a disability or due to that person being the target of discrimination themselves) may need help. You should assess your role to see if there are things you can do as a landlord to help the situation.

-You and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. You must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

-Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

-Special programs and circumstances for housing

Under the Code, special programs are permitted to help a group of people who are disadvantaged based on Code grounds, as long as these programs meet the requirements the Code sets out. Examples would include setting up housing designed for older people, people with disabilities or university students with families.

Tenants Facing Eviction Can Go Offence And Demand “In Person” Landlord And Tenant Board Hearings.

While Online Hearings are unjust, In-Person Hearings are fair and you will have legal rights.

Online Hearings are a trap that will get you evicted and destroyed!

Also, In Person Hearings will be delayed for months so you don’t need to worry about being evicted like cattle being slaughtered to make hamburger.

Find part of the Ontario Human Rights Codes That Fits Your Situation and Demand A Formal, Real “In-Person” Hearing and Win!

File a Tenant Rights T2 Form against your landlord and explain you couldn’t pay rent (or didn’t pay rent) because your landlord broke the Ontario Human Rights Code!

The Human Rights Code won’t be legal if you share a bathroom/kitchen with your landlord or you are just having a “disagreement” with your landlord. So make sure to explain your situation is not just a “disagreement” but the landlord is breaking your Human Rights! This will mean you have the legal right to an “in person” hearing!

Remember, according the Human Rights Codes Landlords MUST ACCOMDATE TENANT NEEDS.

For Example:

1. Landlords have a legal duty to accommodate tenants (meet special needs they may have) if they have real needs, based on Code grounds. You must accommodate up to the point of undue hardship, based on cost, the availability of outside sources of funding, or health and safety concerns.

For example, if you are feeling sick or have an injury  you might need to make changes to a unit, a building entrance, sidewalks or parking areas.

IF THE LANDLORD DIDN’T MAKE THESE CHANGES THEY ARE BREAKING THE ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS CODE.

2. Some tenants need changes to rules and practices to accommodate changing family situations or religious practices. Sometimes a tenant who is unwell  may need help. 

SO IF YOU WERE SICK OR LOST YOUR JOB AND UNWELL YOUR LANDLORD NEEDS TO MAKE SURE THEY HELP YOU OR THEY ARE BREAKING THE HUMAN RIGHTS CODE.

3. Landlords and your tenants share the responsibility for making the accommodation work. Landlords must take an active role in the process and work with tenants in good faith to find the best solution.

YOUR LANDLORD MUST BE RESPONSIBLE FOR TRYING TO MAKE YOUR ACCOMMODATION WORK. THEY CAN’T JUST LEGALLY KICK YOU OUT WITHOUT DOING SO.

4. If your tenant provides you with medical or other personal information, you must keep it private.

YOUR LANDLORD MUST KEEP ALL YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION PRIVATE. THEY CAN’T MAKE BILLBOARDS OR ‘BAD TENANT LISTS’ OR THEY WILL BE FINED

5. Landlords must work with tenants to find and put in place the most appropriate accommodation as soon as possible. If this cannot be done without causing undue hardship, or if it will take a long time, you must provide interim or “next-best” accommodation.

IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH YOUR RENTAL (FOR EXAMPLE IT’S TOO EXPENSIVE DURING THE PANDEMIC) YOUR LANDLORD MUST HAVE TRIED TO OVER YOU INTERIM ACCOMMOCATION.

There Is An Eviction Blitz And The Landlords Are Paper Tigers Who Are Getting Easy Evictions ONLY Because of Corrupt On-Line Hearings! Only A Corrupt Fascist Gov’t With Massive Foreign Funding Is Causing People To Be Evicted And Suffering!

Fight Back And Get Your In Person Hearing And Avoid Being Evicted Due To Banana-Republic Style Corruption And Political Manipulation

When ideology clashed with opportunism, Lenin invariably chose the tactical path above doctrinal purity https://www.historyextra.com/period/20th-century/vladimir-lenin-who-power-rise-how-russian-revolution/

Tenant Groups We Know The On-Line LTB Hearings Are Corrupt. Ford Won’t Fix Them! We Must Help Every Tenant Get An In-Person Hearing NOW! When We Control The State We Can Defund The Sheriff Instead Of Fighting On Their Fascist Terms! Do It!

 

KNOCK OUT YOUR LANDLORD LIKE MUHAMMED ALI IN 2020! You Need To Challenge Your Landlord To Make Them Respect You And Not Rip You Off!

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020

Make Sure You Clearly Show Your Landlord You Are A FIGHTER FOR YOUR TENANT RIGHTS! You Need To Teach Them You Will Fight Back!

The greatest heavyweight boxer of all time was a Black man named Muhammed Ali.  He was not the biggest fighter out there. In fact, he was normal sized and usually the “underdog”.  But he became the champion!

How?

Because he knew bigger boxers underestimated him and though he was not aggressive and weak and small. He made sure they knew he was not weak and would fight aggressively and this led the other boxers to respect him.

This is the same attitude these rich landlords have against us hard working tenants. They think we are weak.  It’s why we all need to fight aggressively and teach them to respect us…and if the don’t they will get knocked out!

Use The Muhammed Ali Strategy To Get Your Landlord To Respect You And Your Rights

Most landlords think they are clever and tenants are stupid and weak and not capable of fighting back.

Why do landlords think they are so clever?

Many bought their rental properties thanks to  mortgage fraud with fake incomes. The mortgage business is very shady and how did some lowly person end up with several rental properties? Hmmm.

And then they avoided all the laws to create a likely illegal rental as cheaply as possible. A rental that is a fire trap that could lead to the deaths of you and your family.

Keep your landlord on the defensive, ALI STYLE!

Tenants Need To Show You Won’t Be Pushed Around Or Cheated On Day 1!

Mohamed Ali knew other fighters thought he was small and old.  He knew the key to his winning (and dominating) was to show the bigger, younger fighter he knew what he was doing and he was fierce and wouldn’t back down!

Ali knew that if he he looked ‘weak’ or ‘intimidated’ it would lead to even more attacks from his opponents.

So he made sure from the first second of the fight to teach his opponent/landlord a lesson

…He showed them he was going to fight harder than they were and he was going to KNOCK THEM OUT!

From The Beginning Of The Fight, Ali Would Show He Would Not Be Intimidated

Ali would come out and jab, jab, jab, punch, punch, punch.  This led the other boxer to respect him.

Tenants need to do the same thing.

Make Your Landlord Know You Fight Back HARD!

Tenants Using Ali Tactics To Fight Back And Protect Your Family

So how can use be like Ali and win?

Here’s how.

If You Are Rejected From Renting a Property You Want To Make Your Home

It’s clear that many landlords refuse tenant applicants by breaking the Ontario Human Rights Commission Laws.

The refuse you because you are on government assistance.  They refuse you because your income isn’t high enough. They refuse you because of your race or citizenship.  They refuse you because of your family.

This is all illegal…and it’s all super common!

Landlords are breaking the law by illegally denying you the home you deserve!

Always demand an exact reason why you were refused.  Record all conversations.

File a Human Rights Complaint against the landlord who refused you. Teach them a lesson they will never forget and make sure their law-breaking will end!

When You Move In

When you move in many landlords think “HAHAHAHA I GOT YOU! PAY ME!”

They have no idea that Tenants have rights and view you as simply their “cash cow” so they can buy expensive cars, take vacations, use your rent money to pay for their kids elite private school tuition!

Just Like Ali, Show Your Power, Knowledge and Willingness to Fight On Day 1

You have to show to your landlord that you are not an idiot that they can rip off.  Most landlords don’t care about the Residential Tenancies Act and don’t care about the Landlord and Tenant Board.

Even if they are aware of it, they think YOU WON’T DARE CHALLENGE YOUR LORD

Make Sure You Challenge Your Landlord And Protect Yourself!

If you don’t do this, your landlord will NOT RESPECT YOU AND WALK ALL OVER YOU!

I know tenants are want to focus our time on our jobs, our studies and our families, but the landlords in Ontario are often PREDATORS and you have to take these steps to protect yourself, especially newcomers to Canada, people on government assistance, single mothers and students.

How To Do Take Action After Moving In? (No Need To Tell Your Landlord At All!)

-First, inspect the property yourself.  If you see any potential issues call your local by-law officer or Toronto 311 and get someone to come and inspect it.

Even if you don’t see any maintenance issues, call your local by-law officer or Toronto 311 (since you are not an expert and you want to make sure your new home is safe).

-Second, call you local Fire Department and ask for them to inspect your rental to make sure it is safe for you and your family.

-Third, if there are any issues at all file against your landlord at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

-Fourth, if there are any issues call the ….against your landlord and they will investigate

-Fifth, if you have any issues or questions, call your landlord and if they don’t answer quickly file a at the Landlord and Tenant Board

What Can I Do If My Landlord Threatens or Harasses Me?

-You can call the police.

-You can call the Investigation Unit

-You an file at the Landlord and Tenant Board

-Call your local By-law office or 311

-Go to your local Legal Aid Clinic or go to an LTB Hearing and talk to “Tenant Duty Counsel”

Even after you beat down your landlord you don’t need to move out! Your landlord will FEAR YOU, and you are the WINNER! Ali Style!

1. Keep calling them
2. Demand action
3. Don’t be polite

…Show them you are smart and will not accept any ‘bad landlord’ games!

Muhammed Ali Was Underestimated and Made Sure His Landlords/Opponents Learned Fast!

Tenants need to do the same in 2020.

Fight back.  Make complaints! Call By laws. Call the Fire Department. Take Your Landlord to the Landlord and Tenant Board.

You thought I was weak? I Will Take You To The LTB, Call By-laws, Call Police, Get Free Legal Help, Call Investigation Unit!

Landlords Fear Tenants Who Know Our Rights!

By being aggressive you educate your landlord that they better BE CAREFUL in dealing with you.

And why not? Since you are paying their mortgage and making them rich. They need us more than we need them.

Get energized and get fighting because you are right and joining a huge Tenant movement for fairness!!! Fight For Your Rights!!!

YOU *DO NOT* HAVE TO PAY RENT ON THE 1st IN ONTARIO (You Have A 2 Week Legal Cushion, And Months More)

Sunday, December 8th, 2019

In These Difficult Economic Times With Precarious Employment and Lay Offs Many Good Tenants Can’t Pay the Rent On Time…But You Can’t Be Kicked Out!

“No baby, we won’t be homeless as Mummy looks for a new job”

We live in difficult times.  Good landlords are aware of this and will support this post as it’s just an informative way your tenants can keep renting your over-priced property and making you rich for doing no real labour.

Landlords need to remember that while you do no work to take our money, tenants must struggle and work every day to try to feed our families and pay you your pound of flesh.

The Toronto Star recently had an article about being evicted and what tenants can do.  The advice was good but very limited as most mainstream media is these days.

This Is A War Against Tenants And the Working Class

The reality is workers are being laid off or even fired in place of third world factories with no human rights.

Even in Toronto many workers are given a low severance and an evil “good bye” as companies seek cheaper labour as they outsource.

Tenants are victims of the “gig economy” unlike Baby Boomers and Generation X who had it so easy in an era of low costs and high wages and even idiots and high school drop outs could get high paying jobs.

They put their businesses in places where workers are treated like slaves. Workers are whipped, chained, raped and beaten…all to make sure that new iPhone gets built for a low cost.

Landlords have a social responsibility

Good Landlords Will Understand Late or None Payment of Rent And Agree For Delays

Tenants are struggling. 

Smart landlords will have some empathy and understand if you can’t pay rent on time. They will give you a break and let you have a month or two of late rent, or even free rent for a few months.

Why Will They Give You A Break? 

Because the costs and risks of renting to new tenants is huge.  They might get a game player who never pay. Or get a nasty tenant who will damage their unit or upset others (including other condo owners). They should give you a break…but….

Landlords hate Tenants who know the rules!

If You Don’t Pay On The First Will You Be Kicked Out?

No!

There is a legal process landlords must follow.

If you don’t pay rent you will have months of rent free living and the opportunity to pay (and stay in your home) after many, many months!

I Didn’t Know That! What Is the Process? 

Landlords will file what is called an N4 to tell you to pay rent.  This give you 14 days to pay, but even if you don’t pay it’s okay!

The N4 is pure intimidation, you don’t have to move! LLs use this paper work to intimidate & threaten.

So If I Don’t Pay I Will Get Kicked Out?

No. 

Not at all, you are protected. You don’t have to pay for 14 days…and if you don’t pay in 14 days the landlord has to “apply” for a “Hearing Date” which can take 6 months or more (and you can pay right up to the date you will be evicted).  So you have months to pay the rent.

So What Happens If I Don’t Pay On The First Of The Month?

The N4 gives you two weeks to pay. You don’t have to pay the rent on the 1st of the month!

The landlord needs to then apply for a “court date” at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

These dates are between 6 to 18 months. That means you have a breather for a long time! 

In These Crazy Economic Times You Deserve a Break At Your Landlords Profits Expense!

Nothing can happen until you go to “court” at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

What Happens In The Period of Not Paying And the Hearing Date?

Nothing. 

You don’t have to pay a cent. And your landlord can’t harass you. 

If they do you can call the government Bad Landlord Police and get the landlord fined and even criminally charged!

You can also call the police.

So I Can Not Pay For Many Months and Still Stay In My Rental?

Yes. 

It’s not “your rental” it’s “your home”. 

The landlord will have to wait for months to get a “court date” at the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB).

What If I Want To Stay, Should I Pay All Rent Before the LTB Hearing?

No. Don’t be foolish.  This is a “business negotiation”.

Go to the Hearing. You are the victim and your landlord is getting rich thanks to your suffering and poverty!  LTB judges know this!

The LTB has a room where tenants and landlords can “work things out” called mediation.

You can agree to pay the rent owed, but why not negotiate?  Say you will pay 20% to avoid a “trial” at the LTB. 

Many landlords will be happy to get the money and avoid the stress of going in front of an LTB adjudicator and potentially getting nothing.

Landlords are scared of trials where they will be held accountable for their crimes against humanity. Google “Nuremberg trials“.

How Can I Prepare For the LTB Hearing?

The best defense is a good offense.

Let’s walk you through this….Take a look around your home.

Do you see any maintenance issues?

Remember: no house is perfect so for sure you can find something.  Mold, stairs not up to code, fridge is not super cold, etc, etc. etc.  You can use this as a weapon!

Do I Have To Tell My Landlord About These Problems Before the Trial?

NO!

Don’t tell them. 

Bring them up at the LTB hearing and SHOCK your landlord.

This will immediately lead the adjudicator to cancel your hearing and book another one so the landlord can fix the things you brought up (hint: bring up a lot of stuff!)

You get another 3 – 6 months of rent free living. You need this help you SURVIVE in this crazy property owner controlled brutal capitalist world!

Landlords call this “trial by ambush” but it’s just part of the legal system to protect good tenants. And it will give you months of more free rent.

This is the best way for poor working class tenants to fight their rich “villa in Paris” or “apartments in China or Iran”.

More Help For Tenants

Remember you can get free legal help (and your landlord doesn’t and has to pay thousands).

Yes, it’s free!  And it will lead your landlord to have to pay for legal representation and while you get if free they will be charged $250 to $400+ per hour! 

You can bleed your landlord dry as they can’t afford these rates.  You pay nothing and they have to pay $300/hour and you can bankrupt them, as many tenants have done (not reported but we all know the score).

So I Don’t Need To Pay For Months And Can Still Live In My Rental Home?

Yes. 

The whole process will take at least 6 to 8+ months (you can live rent free). 

You Can Also Appeal

After 6-8 months to a year of living rent free, and using this money to pay for university and better food for your kids you still have option.  You can pay and stay or you can just leave.

Stay Strong! Don’t Be Intimidated! Learn How ‘The System’ Works To Protect Your Family!

Tenants Waking Up And Fighting For Our Rights

If you can’t pay rent don’t be intimidated. You have a system that protects you and you can even not pay and stay in your home for months (or years if you are smart).

Tenant: I Called The By-Law Department Directly And They Ordered My Landlord To Fix Things…Or Get A Huge Fine!

Thursday, August 1st, 2019

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry

 

You Can Make Sure You Get Fast Repairs By Just Calling Your Local By-Laws Department Directly And Reporting Your Landlord

Sorry I’m not a professional writer or anything but people here encouraged me to share my story to help other tenants. There have been lots of great tenant posts that have helped others like How Ontario Tenants Can Easily Break a Lease, so I’ll try.

Second, this has nothing to do with all the good landlords out there who care about their tenants and make sure their rentals are safe.  This is just about the bad landlords.

I’m a single mum renting a place. As a single mum having a clean and safe property is a priority for me. So when I saw black mold in the bathroom I needed to act to protect my kids!

I called the landlord on Saturday night and texted 5 times and got no reply!

Even by Tuesday no reply, that’s 4 days of potentially poisoning my child!

I went to the Ontario tenants forum and asked others what to do and they said call the by-laws department directly and there is no need to even talk to your landlord because every city and town has laws for maintaining safe houses and tenants can call by-laws directly.

Landlords must follow the law!

By-Law Officer Was Professional And On My Side!

The by-laws officer came the next day and I asked her to do a huge, complete inspection of the rental house to protect me and my kids and she agreed.  She saw the black mold.

But it didn’t end there, as the Officer inspected the entire rental property! 

I was so happy to have help and protection for me and my family! She also found a lot of other issues (wiring, insulation) and even found the shingles were not up to code!

The by-laws officer said she would send a letter to the landlord demanding things get fixed or the landlord would be fined thousands of dollars. The landlord was also given a firm date to do the repairs, so they couldn’t “play games.”

A week later the landlord contacted me and gave me a schedule for lots of contractors to come to fix the mold and all the other issues.

I said “NO! You need to follow MY SCHEDULE or I will call the By-Law Officer again!” 

My landlord agreed fast, because he was worried that I was a smart tenant who knows my rights and he can’t treat me like crap or I will call the by-laws department again!

Tenants if you have any problems don’t even waste your time to call your landlord.  They are cheap and stingy and don’t care about you and your children at all!

Don’t waste time…call the by-laws department directly and they will come, you let them in, and you show them all the potential problems.

Then, the fight is between by-laws and your landlord, not you and your landlord.

And landlords get scared when the government is involved and will respect you and fear you for know how to protect your rights! They also know if they get fined the government will collect it.

Tenants Can Call By-Laws Directly And They Will Force Your Landlord To Make Repairs Or Get Charged Thousands of Dollars

Good landlords who take care of their rental properties don’t need to worry. But if you have a bad landlord you can call by-laws directly and make your landlord scared and obey your every command!

How Can You Contact Your Local By-Laws Department? 

Just call your city or town. And ask the receptionist to put you through to “the by-law department”.  It’s easy and they are excellent!

Ontario Tenants – Bad Landlords Are Out There But You Can Protect Yourself!

Ontario Landlords Need To Be Protected – The Current System Just Isn’t Fair!

Monday, December 4th, 2017

ola landlords speak out

Ontario Landlords Speak Out and Share Their Concerns and Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

The Rental Fairness Act Isn’t Fair For Landlords – Ontario Small Landlords Need More Protection

ola it's not fair

Tens of thousands of small landlords emailed in as part of our drive to create a way for landlords and tenants to communicate with each other to find positive common ground. While there are some unethical landlords out there, by far the vast majority of us try our best to be excellent landlords with attractive, well-maintained rentals.

The vast majority of small Ontario landlords play by the rules and care for our tenants and our properties.

The Ontario Rules Do Not Protect Small Landlords And This Isn’t Fair

One of the most common themes in all the replies was that while landlords want to learn and follow the rules those same rules often don’t adequately protect small landlords.

This means landlords who make sure they do everything according to the Residential Tenancies Act and the Landlord and Tenant Board still find themselves in very difficult situations stemming from bad tenants. These bad situations often mean losing thousands of dollars.

However it also goes beyond just financial losses.

Under the existing system landlords experiencing incredible stress, worry and sleepless nights when they are just using the system in place and following the rules. This isn’t right and this isn’t fair.

Good people making huge investments in our province need to be protected and must not be subjected to tenants who can easily manipulate the rules to cause harm and huge financial losses. Recently there was a good media story of a tenant who created a fake credit report to trick landlords into renting to him. He then ripped off his landlords and also cheated other tenants. He is now wanted by the police.

Let’s Protect Good Tenants, But We Also Need to Protect Good Landlords

Most of our small landlord members were renting themselves not that long ago. We are the working class looking to support our retirements and hopefully get some cash flow as a return on our investments. Many of us rented as students at Ontario universities and colleges and many others rented while beginning their careers.

We support protections for tenants, but we need to also protect good landlords. Currently things are simply not balanced.

What Happened To The Changes To Encourage More People To Invest in Rental Properties?

It was only a year or so ago that that landlords were asked to present needed changes to the Ministry. The request was for current landlords to suggest new policy ideas to help them succeed, and this would in turn encourage more people to become landlords in Ontario.

It was a good idea as with a better, fairer system more people would invest in rental properties and this would lead to more choices for tenants and more affordable rental housing in Ontario.

Our landlord members were not worried about increased competition from new landlords and investors. In fact, they were very enthusiastic and excited about getting changes that are desperately needed to help landlords continue to even run existing rentals. With a better system and more protections, landlords could better deal with bad tenants who abuse the system.

More Protections for Ontario Tenants But What About Fairness for Small Landlords?

When the Rental Fairness Act was announced in April many landlords were excited and expected to hear about new protections for small landlords. An Ottawa landlord organized an online event and many our members networked and watched the news conference on the Premier’s YouTube channel.

After the news conference good Ontario landlords were extremely disappointed, and many were upset.

For while there were many changes designed to help tenants, there was little to help small landlords. No one objected to helping good tenants but wasn’t the goal to encourage more great people to invest and create a lot more amazing rental properties?

A Toronto Landlord asked: “Why are the concerns of small landlords ignored as we are key stake-holders in Ontario and important rental housing providers!?”

Some of the major challenges Ontario landlords are facing include:

Evicting for Smoking

Dealing with tenants who smoke, and have this smoke bother other tenants, has been a problem for many small landlords for years. With new laws regarding marijuana this issue is just going to become larger and we need to find a solution.

Creating a New System to Help Landlords and Tenants with Pets

Our landlord members love pets and many have pets of their own. However, we need a way to make sure tenants take care of their pets and don’t damage the rental property. 

Ontario Landlords Association members suggested we create a voluntary “pet deposit”. Tenants with pets would pay a deposit to protect the small landlord from any damages from the pets (and they do happen). When the tenants move out they will get the deposit back if there aren’t any big damages. If their aren’t any pet damages and the landlord doesn’t give the deposit back the tenant can take pictures, file at the LTB, and get the deposit back.

Making the Rent Increase Guideline More Fair For Service Oriented Small Landlords

With even newer rental properties covered by the rent increase guideline (which is only 1.8% in 2018) we need a way to make sure the guideline covers the true cost increases landlords face.

Making the Landlord and Tenant Board More Efficient and Effective

When landlords have problems with renters in their properties we have to go to the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) to seek justice and fix the problems. While most LTB staff are hard working and professional, the way the LTB is designed needs to be improved.

-We cannot continue to have landlords waiting for weeks or even months to even get a Hearing date.

-We cannot continue to have tenants ‘ambushing’ landlords with maintenance claims at the Hearing.

-We need the Enforcement Office to enforce LTB evictions in a time sensitive way, meaning days not weeks or months 

This is just the start of issues that need to be addressed.

Closing Loopholes Exploited By Bad Tenants

We need to make sure the Landlord and Tenant Board process is fair and end loopholes that delay evictions. Some unethical tenants can delay being evicted for months.

The Rules For Small Landlords Need To Change

Small landlords are not huge corporations, massive REITS with stockholders and millions of dollars available from investors from all over the country and around the world.

Small Ontario landlords are working people who believe in the future of our province and have invested their hard-earned savings into Ontario rentals hoping for a better future. Many landlords are newcomers to Canada who want to run successful rental businesses as part of their contributions to their new country.

Ontario Landlords and Tenants Speak Out: “I Wish The Rental Fairness Act Was Fair For Landlords!”

We have asked many of the landlords who emailed in to expand on their concerns and stories of challenges they have faced owning rental properties in Ontario. We have also asked Ontario tenants who wrote in the same thing and look forward to posting their opinions and ideas.

By working together we can create a better, fairer Ontario rental industry that helps both good landlords and good tenants.

The current system just isn’t fair for small Ontario Landlords and that’s not fair

We need changes to be made to protect small landlords or we will see a big drop in investment and less high quality and affordable rental properties. We aren’t huge corporations who can put up ads near Queen’s Park and hold golf tournaments and invite Brian Mulroney to sip champagne with us…we are too busy working and taking care of our rental properties.

Who are small landlords?

We are teachers, contractors, electricians, firefighters, police officers, nurses, doctors, lawyers, Realtors…we are the people of Ontario. And we have been treated unfairly for too long.

Small landlords need support as we truly are important stake-holders in Ontario and need to be protected as the current system simply isn’t fair.