Archive for the ‘naborly’ Category

Sunday, August 1st, 2021

Tenants Speak Out & Share Their Concerns & Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements.

Most of us used to rent to and we have tried to become the landlords we always wanted to rent from but could never find.

These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association.

We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry in a win-win business relationship.

To contribute your experiences and advice please email us at:  tenantexperiences@groupmail.com (All contributions must be a minimum of 300 words and include your name, contact number, address, a copy of your lease, all which will all be kept private and destroyed upon confirmation.)

The post below has been recommended by the Tenant Community as extremely helpful and important information. 

By Working Together Tenants And Small Landlords Can Get A Better Understanding of the Issues And Improve The Ontario Rental Industry.

Let’s all face issues straight on and work to make the Ontario Rental Industry not only an example for Canada, but for the world!

 

The Landlord and Tenant Board Listened To The OLA To Help & Protect Good Landlords and Tenants

Friday, June 11th, 2021

The LTB Has Changed The Law To Ensure Fair LTB Hearings

Over recent months some individuals and some organized groups have attempted to disrupt Landlord and Tenant Board Hearings in an obtrusive manner.

This included recording Hearings, posting recordings online and harassing landlords and adjudicators.

Many small Ontario landlords who have had a Hearing have commented that these disruptions severely interfered with integrity and fairness of the LTB proceedings.

As important stake-holders we reached out to the LTB with a fair and strong message, as we have done for over a decade.

Our recommended changes have now been made into law!

It’s important to note that this amendment does not restrict or change the ability of members of the public to observe hearings. So it’s fair.

Observers are not permitted to disrupt the hearing in any way, and the LTB has the authority to issue directions or orders necessary to control the hearing process.

The OLA is happy our advice have been made into law and actions have been taken to protect both good landlords and good tenants.

It’s also stopped bad people from both sides from obstructing justice.

 

DATE:            June 8, 2021

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair and Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 SPPA Amendments

The Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) is committed to delivering administrative justice in a manner that is transparent, fair, independent, and accessible in accordance with the open court principle.

As you may know, there have been incidents of individuals and some organized groups recording LTB hearings without permission and posting the recordings on social media.

Effective June 3, 2021, a new section 29 has been added to the Statutory Powers Procedure Act making it an offence to record or publish a tribunal hearing unless an exception applies. Exceptions include unobtrusive recordings made by a party, representative or member of the media if authorized by the tribunal. The amendment was included in the Ontario government’s Supporting Recovery and Competitiveness Act, 2021.

This provision is similar to restrictions on recording court proceedings contained in the Courts of Justice Act. This amendment will help Tribunals Ontario ensure the integrity and fairness of its proceedings.

It’s important to note that this amendment does not restrict or change the ability of members of the public to observe hearings. LTB hearings are open to the public, unless an LTB adjudicator has determined that a specific hearing should be closed to the public in accordance with the LTB Rules of Procedure.  Observers are not permitted to disrupt the hearing in any way, and the LTB has the authority to issue directions or orders necessary to control the hearing process.

Sincerely,

Karen Restoule                    Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar

How To Speed Up Getting Your Eviction Enforced

Monday, May 17th, 2021

May 14, 2021

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 Expedited Enforcement of Eviction Orders

On May 13, 2021 the Government of Ontario announced that the stay-at-home order would be extended until June 2, 2021. Ontario Regulation 266/21 made under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act will also remain in effect during this time.

Ontario Regulation 266/21 states that the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) cannot enforce any Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) eviction order unless the order asks the Sheriff to expedite the enforcement.  The Sheriff can resume enforcing all eviction orders after the Government of Ontario removes the regulation.

The LTB is continuing to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

The purpose of this memo is to provide information on when an eviction order issued by the LTB may include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement.

Section 84 of the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (“RTA”) says that the LTB must include such a request to the Sheriff in the order where the tenant is being evicted for certain types of very serious conduct, and the adjudicator has not delayed the enforcement date pursuant to section 83(1)(b) of the RTA. The grounds for eviction in section 84 are:

  • Willfully damaging the rental unit
  • Using the unit in a way which is inconsistent with residential use and caused, or is likely to cause, significant damage
  • Committing an illegal act in the unit involving the production or trafficking of illegal drugs
  • Seriously impairing someone’s safety
  • Substantially interfering with the landlord’s reasonable enjoyment – in cases where the landlord and tenant live in the same building and the building has three or fewer residential units

If a landlord believes that an eviction order should include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement, but the application is not based on any of the grounds contained in section 84 of the RTA, the landlord may raise this issue during the hearing. The adjudicator may consider whether the tenant is responsible for an urgent problem such as a serious and ongoing health or safety issue at the residential complex or a serious illegal act that occurred at the residential complex. The tenant will have the opportunity to make submissions on this issue if they are at the hearing.

If the hearing for the landlord’s eviction application has already been completed but the order has not been issued, the landlord may contact the LTB to ask the adjudicator who held the hearing to consider adding to the order a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement of eviction. Landlords can submit a request to expedite enforcement of the eviction by fax, mail or email. The tenant will have an opportunity to make submissions on this issue.

Eviction orders that have already been issued can only be changed if the order contains a serious error or a clerical mistake. If a landlord believes that an order contains a serious error, the landlord may file a request to review the order. If the landlord believes that the order contains a clerical mistake, the landlord may file a request to amend the order. More information on this process is available on the Application and Hearing Process page of our website.

We remain committed to updating you about operational planning and we are appreciative of your patience and cooperation as we continue to adjust our operations in response to the ongoing pandemic.

Sincerely,

Karen Restoule

Associate Chair

Lynn Dicaire

Registrar

TENANT GAME CHANGER! TENANTS CAN NOW REPORT YOUR LANDLORDS AND LEAVE REVIEWS ANONYMOUSLY! (Without Consent)

Tuesday, April 13th, 2021

There Is A Great New Company That Gives Tenants The Power To Rate Their Landlord! You Can Post Anonymously And Consent Is Not Required! Click On GOOD NEIGHBOUR For Justice!

We’ve heard about so many slimy landlord “help” companies over the past few years. It’s open-season on Tenants!

Whether it’s creating secret bad tenant lists or promising defamatory ways to “kick the asses” of Tenants these companies are not even really helping landlords, but they appeal to landlords’ worst instincts.

As expected, they have a lot of “pumpers” providing misinformation to get their cut of the pie at the expense of good landlords. It’s all about the $$$$.

It’s a shame even good landlords are getting suckered in and will they will pay for their actions soon. It’s just a matter of time, you will see.

Now Tenants Can Fight Back Against Bad Landlords And Their Misleading, Slimy Services

Great news for Tenants and good landlords with a new site that empowers Tenants to report and review your landlords anonymously and without their consent!

The Company is Called “Good Neighbour” And It’s A Game Changer

This amazing app is free and here’s what they are all about:

-Learn about your future home from those who have lived in the unit before you.

-Share your rental experiences anonymously with others.

-Share your wisdom.

Get The Truth Told! Personal Experiences Are Key!

Apartment listings don’t paint the full picture.

-What’s the landlord like?

-What about the neighbours?

-Is the management company helpful?

-What’s it like living in the neighbourhood?

Share your experience (anonymously) to help your future neighbours.

You don’t need your landlords’ consent 8-)

Why Can’t We Report Landlords To Credit Bureaus Like Landlords Do?

Because the whole reporting thing is a marketing scam and basically useless!

The whole “report Tenants to the credit bureaus to raise or drop their score” isn’t true like some companies are marketing.

It’ ridiculous and just marketing campaign to get naïve, desperate landlords to pay money and give them the fake illusion of power, LOL!

The dirty little secret the shills won’t tell you is landlords reporting tenants rent doesn’t dent the Tenants’ credit score beyond a small, tiny way that has have no real impact!

It’s basically useless and total gaslighting and won’t help or harm credit scores except in a very, very tiny fashion.  People think this reporting will play a big role in a tenants credit score, but it’s not true!

Sadly so many have been misled and so many small landlord shills are misleading landlords to try to catch some ca$h.

So no need for Tenants to follow this marketing scam! The real way is to review your landlords and tell the truth about them! This will help good landlords and protect us from the slumlords out there!

 

JOIN NOW…IT’S FREE! REVIEW ALL YOUR LANDLORDS, EVEN PREVIOUS LANDLORDS!

.

THIS HELPS LANDLORDS BECAUSE GOOD REVIEWS WILL HELP THEM FIND GOOD TENANTS!

GOOD LANDLORDS ARE GOING TO BE REWARDED!

IT’S A KICK TO THE A** OF BAD LANDLORDS WHO NEED TO CHANGE THEIR WAYS OR BE PUNISHED

CLICK ON GOOD NEIGHBOUR, IT’S FREE!

https://usegoodnbr.com/

 

Thursday, April 8th, 2021

April 8, 2021

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair

RE:                 Expedited Enforcement of Eviction Orders

On April 8, 2021, the Government of Ontario issued Ontario Regulation 266/21 made under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act.

This regulation states that the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) cannot enforce any Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) eviction order unless the order asks the Sheriff to expedite the enforcement.  The Sheriff can resume enforcing all eviction orders after the Government of Ontario removes the regulation.

The LTB is continuing to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

The purpose of this memo is to provide information on when an eviction order issued by the LTB may include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement.

Section 84 of the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (“RTA”) says that the LTB must include such a request to the Sheriff in the order where the tenant is being evicted for certain types of very serious conduct, and the adjudicator has not delayed the enforcement date pursuant to section 83(1)(b) of the RTA. The grounds for eviction in section 84 are:

  • Willfully damaging the rental unit
  • Using the unit in a way which is inconsistent with residential use and caused, or is likely to cause, significant damage
  • Committing an illegal act in the unit involving the production or trafficking of illegal drugs
  • Seriously impairing someone’s safety
  • Substantially interfering with the landlord’s reasonable enjoyment – in cases where the landlord and tenant live in the same building and the building has three or fewer residential units

If a landlord believes that an eviction order should include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement, but the application is not based on any of the grounds contained in section 84 of the RTA, the landlord may raise this issue during the hearing. The adjudicator may consider whether the tenant is responsible for an urgent problem such as a serious and ongoing health or safety issue at the residential complex or a serious illegal act that occurred at the residential complex. The tenant will have the opportunity to make submissions on this issue if they are at the hearing.

If the hearing for the landlord’s eviction application has already been completed but the order has not been issued, the landlord may contact the LTB to ask the adjudicator who held the hearing to consider adding to the order a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement of eviction. Landlords can submit a request to expedite enforcement of the eviction by fax, mail or email. The tenant will have an opportunity to make submissions on this issue.

Eviction orders that have already been issued can only be changed if the order contains a serious error or a clerical mistake. If a landlord believes that an order contains a serious error, the landlord may file a request to review the order. If the landlord believes that the order contains a clerical mistake, the landlord may file a request to amend the order. More information on this process is available on the Application and Hearing Process page of our website.

We remain committed to updating you about operational planning and we are appreciative of your patience and cooperation as we continue to adjust our operations in response to the ongoing pandemic.

If you have any questions, please contact us at LTB@ontario.ca.

Sincerely,

[Original signed by]              [Original signed by]

Karen Restoule                    Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar