Archive for the ‘landlord advocacy’ Category

The Landlord and Tenant Board Is A Nightmare! (Part 1)

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

The Landlord and Tenant Board Is Unfair, Biased & Unprofessional 

It Needs To Be Replaced With A Better System!

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

For the first two years my venture into becoming a residential landlord had turned out pretty well. I got into the industry because of Scott McgilIvray and his show ‘Income Property’ on HGTV.

Scott is an attractive sales person and made it seem like not only a simple investment, but something I needed to do or I would miss out on a historic opportunity to make money.

The more I looked into it the better this investment vehicle looked.

This Was An Exciting Investment And I Was ‘All In”

Real estate prices were appreciating so my investment could really pay off whenever I decided to sell it.

And with so many young people looking for good housing due to the low vacancy rate there would be lots of “good tenant clients.” These tenants would not only provide a new income stream for me, but also take care of my properties while they appreciated.

This was exciting and I was all in. This was going to make sure I would be financially ready for retirement.

A Great Start To My New Investment

I made sure the property was attractive and in a good location. Scott said it was important my rent was at the ‘market’ level of the area.

The first people who applied where a young couple who were saving for their own place. They were very up front and said they expected this would take about a while and requested a two year lease.

After getting some good advice from the Ontario landlord forum, I said we would start with a one year lease. 

I also told them if things went well we could re-sign for another year. It worked out perfectly.

Great Tenants, And Two Years Went By Fast

Looking back, I was lucky.  I found two really responsible people for my first tenants.  A young teacher and his partner a young nurse. Rent was paid on time and we had a friendly and professional relationship.

Wow, This Is Easy!

After reading about some bad tenants I thought “wow this is easy” and “why are so many other landlords complaining? Maybe it’s their own fault?”

I didn’t really have to do anything except collect the rent.  The couple were very serious about building up their credit score and savings for a downpayment and near the end of the second year they bought their own property.

They asked to break the lease a six months early because they wanted to move into the new place. I agreed to this and they left.

A Month Of Vacancy For Clean Up and Damages 

Sure there were some holes in the drywall from the big screen tv hooks, mirrors and paintings they put up but I didn’t mind.  And the stove/oven wasn’t cleaned, but it wasn’t damaged. 

There were some other issues which I was a bit surprised they left. It would cost me at least $1000 for the repairs/clean up. They said they would leave the place as the found it…but they didn’t.

Still my thinking was “they stayed for a year and half.  And this will give me a month to clean up, do repairs, and find even better tenants. 

Finding My Next Tenants

My next tenant was a very personable lady who was a single mom. She had a  job and some really good references. Her credit score was really high too. But the key thing is she was very friendly and open.

She said her fiance was working in a high paid job in another province and the plan was for them to get married in a few years. He was really busy in his job.

I was really happy to meet her and provide great housing to her and her child.

First and last was paid and she said she might want to stay for many years and this sounded great to me. We signed the lease and I made sure the property was better than ever.

Who Is This Guy Yelling At Me? I Never Rented To Him

Things changed fast.

Within a week I received a call from a neighbour about the one parking spot I gave to the tenant was now being filled and a second car which was being either squeezed in (with part of it sticking over on to the road) or parked illegally on the road overnight.

I went to check it out and went to talk to my tenant.

Instead of my tenant, a guy who I had never seen before answered the door. He was big and menacing.

A Stranger Living In My House, Let’s Call Him “Mr. X”

When I asked who he was he said he was now living there with my tenant. I asked him why he was living there.  He said he was living with his girlfriend.

Okay, But I Have To Protect Myself

I asked “Can you please give me your name?”

He said “I don’t have to tell you that, legally!”

I asked “Since you are living here can I add you to the lease?”

He said “No, I’m a guest and there’s nothing you can do about it.”

I asked “Since you are living in my property you need to give me your information.”

He said “No I don’t. Don’t be a slumlord. Contact the Landlord Tenant Board and be careful.”

I asked told him about the parking and he said he would deal with it to avoid any issues with the City.

He seemed worried about the city but not worried about me, the property owner.

I called the Landlord and Tenant Board And They Were Useless

The Landlord and Tenant Board told me:

“Landlords can’t stop tenants from having friends over.  Above this advice you need to get your own legal help.”

OMG. My tax dollars at work?!

Rent Not Paid

The beginning of the next month the rent was not paid.

I tried to contact the tenant by phone, text and email.  I thought visiting there should not be part of the first step as Mr. X was aggressive and I wanted to avoid confrontation.

The next day still nothing.

Serving The Notice N4 – Pay Rent Or Be Evicted

On the third day I went to the property and knocked on the door.

No one answered. And this lack of response continued.

I Gave Them Every Chance To Pay But Now Decided To Evict Them

I tried to be fair and provided them a week but still no response. 

I personally served the N4 which would give them 14 days to pay or they would have to move.

I Won’t Pay Rent Because the Property Is Unsafe And You Are Irresponsible!

After sending the N4 my tenant called me and immediately started screaming at me as if I was some bad person.

She said the eviction notice was “unacceptable” because she didn’t pay rent because she and her baby were afraid to live in such a dangerous and poorly maintained property.

She said I, the landlord, was harassing her and unapproachable and only wanted ‘rent, with no concern for her safety”.

She read me a list of maintenance issues her guest had found and demanded they be fixed within 48 hours or give them a rent abatement or they would “take me to the Landlord and Tenant Board.

What Issues? The Place Is Well Maintained!

I said I will try but I would need to check out the issues myself.

I also said if there were issues I would certainly fix them.  But it would take more than 48 hours to book a professional and certified contractor to do any repairs.

She said if things were not fixed she would file against me at the Landlord and Tenant Board….or she “would accept $3,000 cash or against the rent (three months rent!)

The Property Was Well Maintained Before She Moved In, Now So Many Problems?

I provided 24 hour notice and went in to see the so-called problems.

The boyfriend/guest was the one guiding me to show why they needed $3000 in either cash or free rent, or “immediate repairs” for their “reasonable enjoyment.”

He was a big guy and I felt pretty scared and he was bullying. I felt he would destroy the property in an instant if I angered him.

He said f I “didn’t play ball” he said he would take me to the Landlord and Tenant Board where, he bragged “I will win and you will lose! I’ve been there before.”

So What Were the “Maintenance Issues?”

As I was guided around my own property I was presented with a big list of problems.

1. The 3 Year Old “Top Of The Line” Kitchen Aid Stove

The burners don’t work and the oven doesn’t heat properly.  This meant the tenants couldn’t cook and had to order pizza and Chinese food, as they had a ‘baby’.

2. The 3 Year Old “Top Of the Line” Samsung Dryer

The dryer didn’t work and they had to dry the baby’s clothes at the laundry mat which was far away and they had to take taxis. 

3. The 3 Year Old “Top of the Line” Samsung Washing Machine

The washer didn’t work and they had to dry the baby’s clothes at the laundry mat which was far away and they had to take taxis.  

4. Mold in the Bathroom

He said this was a huge concern and he would also call the city if I didn’t pay $3000 or give the rent discount. He said the mold could seriously harm the baby.

5. Cracks in the Drywall

He said he was worried the rental would “fall down and kill them all” due to this. 

He said this was a “matter of life and death” and I needed to deal with this fast as the “entire property is unsafe.”  He sad the property might need to be torn down due to all the infractions.

These are just the top 5 “problems” he presented to me.  There were lots more.

These Issues Never Existed Before

I explained to “Mr. X”  I had previous renters who never had any of these issues. I said I would need time to investigate them.

You Have 48 Hours

He said “you have 48 hours”. 

I texted my tenant and said I was taking this seriously and was investigating it and would contact her.

I Took This Super Seriously

I spoke with representatives from Samsung and Kitchen Aid.

I asked whether or not these types of issues are common. The replies where they were not.

I spoke with a mold specialist and he said if there wasn’t mold before and if the bathroom has a fan there should be no problem, especially only after a month of them living there.

YES THERE WAS A FAN.

I spoke to a dry wall installer and he said the cracks were probably due to kicking or punching and there should be no problem with a three year old property

The Next Month Came, No Rent Paid Again

For the very next month the rent check bounced.

No one answered the phone and I went to visit. I notice the window was smashed (the tenant never informed me). No one answered the door.

A Served an N4 For Non-Payment of Rent

As they didn’t pay rent I served them a form N4 – Notice to Evict for Non-Payment of rent.

A Tenants Rights Form Was Sent To My Mailing Address The Next Day by Courier!

I received notice that I was failing to maintain the property and was failing to protect the tenants “reasonable enjoyment of the property” under the law.  I was told that I was required to attend an official Hearing for my neglect. 

So I Did Everything Right…But Now I Had To Defend Myself Against False Accusations!

I was accused of being a bad landlord by someone I never met, rent was not paid, and the worst was yet to come!

 

Ontario Landlords Need To Be Protected – The Current System Just Isn’t Fair!

Monday, December 4th, 2017

ola landlords speak out

Ontario Landlords Speak Out and Share Their Concerns and Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

The Rental Fairness Act Isn’t Fair For Landlords – Ontario Small Landlords Need More Protection

ola it's not fair

Tens of thousands of small landlords emailed in as part of our drive to create a way for landlords and tenants to communicate with each other to find positive common ground. While there are some unethical landlords out there, by far the vast majority of us try our best to be excellent landlords with attractive, well-maintained rentals.

The vast majority of small Ontario landlords play by the rules and care for our tenants and our properties.

The Ontario Rules Do Not Protect Small Landlords And This Isn’t Fair

One of the most common themes in all the replies was that while landlords want to learn and follow the rules those same rules often don’t adequately protect small landlords.

This means landlords who make sure they do everything according to the Residential Tenancies Act and the Landlord and Tenant Board still find themselves in very difficult situations stemming from bad tenants. These bad situations often mean losing thousands of dollars.

However it also goes beyond just financial losses.

Under the existing system landlords experiencing incredible stress, worry and sleepless nights when they are just using the system in place and following the rules. This isn’t right and this isn’t fair.

Good people making huge investments in our province need to be protected and must not be subjected to tenants who can easily manipulate the rules to cause harm and huge financial losses. Recently there was a good media story of a tenant who created a fake credit report to trick landlords into renting to him. He then ripped off his landlords and also cheated other tenants. He is now wanted by the police.

Let’s Protect Good Tenants, But We Also Need to Protect Good Landlords

Most of our small landlord members were renting themselves not that long ago. We are the working class looking to support our retirements and hopefully get some cash flow as a return on our investments. Many of us rented as students at Ontario universities and colleges and many others rented while beginning their careers.

We support protections for tenants, but we need to also protect good landlords. Currently things are simply not balanced.

What Happened To The Changes To Encourage More People To Invest in Rental Properties?

It was only a year or so ago that that landlords were asked to present needed changes to the Ministry. The request was for current landlords to suggest new policy ideas to help them succeed, and this would in turn encourage more people to become landlords in Ontario.

It was a good idea as with a better, fairer system more people would invest in rental properties and this would lead to more choices for tenants and more affordable rental housing in Ontario.

Our landlord members were not worried about increased competition from new landlords and investors. In fact, they were very enthusiastic and excited about getting changes that are desperately needed to help landlords continue to even run existing rentals. With a better system and more protections, landlords could better deal with bad tenants who abuse the system.

More Protections for Ontario Tenants But What About Fairness for Small Landlords?

When the Rental Fairness Act was announced in April many landlords were excited and expected to hear about new protections for small landlords. An Ottawa landlord organized an online event and many our members networked and watched the news conference on the Premier’s YouTube channel.

After the news conference good Ontario landlords were extremely disappointed, and many were upset.

For while there were many changes designed to help tenants, there was little to help small landlords. No one objected to helping good tenants but wasn’t the goal to encourage more great people to invest and create a lot more amazing rental properties?

A Toronto Landlord asked: “Why are the concerns of small landlords ignored as we are key stake-holders in Ontario and important rental housing providers!?”

Some of the major challenges Ontario landlords are facing include:

Evicting for Smoking

Dealing with tenants who smoke, and have this smoke bother other tenants, has been a problem for many small landlords for years. With new laws regarding marijuana this issue is just going to become larger and we need to find a solution.

Creating a New System to Help Landlords and Tenants with Pets

Our landlord members love pets and many have pets of their own. However, we need a way to make sure tenants take care of their pets and don’t damage the rental property. 

Ontario Landlords Association members suggested we create a voluntary “pet deposit”. Tenants with pets would pay a deposit to protect the small landlord from any damages from the pets (and they do happen). When the tenants move out they will get the deposit back if there aren’t any big damages. If their aren’t any pet damages and the landlord doesn’t give the deposit back the tenant can take pictures, file at the LTB, and get the deposit back.

Making the Rent Increase Guideline More Fair For Service Oriented Small Landlords

With even newer rental properties covered by the rent increase guideline (which is only 1.8% in 2018) we need a way to make sure the guideline covers the true cost increases landlords face.

Making the Landlord and Tenant Board More Efficient and Effective

When landlords have problems with renters in their properties we have to go to the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) to seek justice and fix the problems. While most LTB staff are hard working and professional, the way the LTB is designed needs to be improved.

-We cannot continue to have landlords waiting for weeks or even months to even get a Hearing date.

-We cannot continue to have tenants ‘ambushing’ landlords with maintenance claims at the Hearing.

-We need the Enforcement Office to enforce LTB evictions in a time sensitive way, meaning days not weeks or months 

This is just the start of issues that need to be addressed.

Closing Loopholes Exploited By Bad Tenants

We need to make sure the Landlord and Tenant Board process is fair and end loopholes that delay evictions. Some unethical tenants can delay being evicted for months.

The Rules For Small Landlords Need To Change

Small landlords are not huge corporations, massive REITS with stockholders and millions of dollars available from investors from all over the country and around the world.

Small Ontario landlords are working people who believe in the future of our province and have invested their hard-earned savings into Ontario rentals hoping for a better future. Many landlords are newcomers to Canada who want to run successful rental businesses as part of their contributions to their new country.

Ontario Landlords and Tenants Speak Out: “I Wish The Rental Fairness Act Was Fair For Landlords!”

We have asked many of the landlords who emailed in to expand on their concerns and stories of challenges they have faced owning rental properties in Ontario. We have also asked Ontario tenants who wrote in the same thing and look forward to posting their opinions and ideas.

By working together we can create a better, fairer Ontario rental industry that helps both good landlords and good tenants.

The current system just isn’t fair for small Ontario Landlords and that’s not fair

We need changes to be made to protect small landlords or we will see a big drop in investment and less high quality and affordable rental properties. We aren’t huge corporations who can put up ads near Queen’s Park and hold golf tournaments and invite Brian Mulroney to sip champagne with us…we are too busy working and taking care of our rental properties.

Who are small landlords?

We are teachers, contractors, electricians, firefighters, police officers, nurses, doctors, lawyers, Realtors…we are the people of Ontario. And we have been treated unfairly for too long.

Small landlords need support as we truly are important stake-holders in Ontario and need to be protected as the current system simply isn’t fair.

BC Landlords & Tenants Are Asking For Our Help In Dealing With Pets

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

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You Can Play An Important Role in Helping Improve the Canadian Rental Industry By Sharing Your Experiences To Help BC Landlords And Tenants Create New Rental Policy On The Pet Issue in British Columbia

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.  Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at landlordtenantsolutions@groupmail.com In this case let’s help BC Landlords and Tenants!

Let’s Help BC Create Fair Rules for BC Landlords and BC Tenants With Pets

Ontario Landlords know how important it is to work together to come up with ideas and solutions to improve the rental industry. Our members came up with thousands of emails sent in when we made key suggestions to the province on what changes need to be made to improve the Ontario rental industry.

Led by our many experienced and successful landlords we have also come up with thousands of tips and strategies for landlords to succeed. And a key aspect of all the great advice provided to OLA members is how important it is to have a ‘win-win’ business relationship with your tenants.

Experienced landlords know great tenants are looking for great landlords with amazing rental properties. You need to be extremely careful not to rent to bad, unethical tenants who will manipulate the system. These are tenants who will “play games” with you and use the Landlord and Tenant Board to delay evictions.

The good news is the reality is there are lots of great people out there looking to rent a property. These are people who will pay the rent on time, respect the law, and treat you and your rental property with respect.

These great tenants are looking for knowledgeable, professional landlords who not only know the the Landlord and Tenant Board and Residential Tenancy Act, but also are willing to work with their tenant clients for a win-win business relationship!

An Ottawa landlord posted in our members forum:

“A young couple saw my rental and liked it. But they had a bunch of questions for me. The questions where everything to what would happen is something breaks to how to deal with a move out after one year.

I told them I was an OLA member and a professional landlord and answered all their questions clearly based on the law. They were super impressed and decided to rent my condo over the others they saw. They told me “my professionalism made the difference and why they decided to rent my place…because of me!”

By working with your tenants you can create a win-win situation.”

british columbia landlords pets

BC Landlords And Tenants Have Asked For Our Help

These days BC landlords and tenants are having an important debate on dealing with renting to tenants who have pets.

It’s a very important issue out there as the new government is looking at making a lot of big changes in the way the BC rental business is run. Even the media is doing some major reporting on the issue of BC tenants and pets recently.

Let’s Speak Out To Help BC Landlords And Tenants Create New and Fair Rental Policy

Here are some facts about how the “pet situation” is currently in British Columbia:

1. As of now BC Landlords Can Demand “No Pets” to Tenants

While many small landlords will think this make sense it’s important to see the social consequences of this policy.

2. BC Families Forced to “Give Up” Their Pets Who Are Part of Their Family

According to facts provided over 1,700 families who need to rent were forced to give up their pets and companion animals in order to secure a rental property.  It’s a pretty shocking number and it certainly is something that needs to be changed there.

3. Forcing to Abandon a Pet/Family Member Just to Get Accepted For a Rental Isn’t Fair

Many tenants feel landlords need to treat tenants with pets equally with tenants who don’t have pets.

Let’s Help BC Landlords and Tenants Create a Better Rental Industry Based On Your Experiences

BC Landlords and tenants are asking for your help based on your experiences. They want real world advice and not some salaried spokesperson who doesn’t even own rentals speaking down to small landlords.

BC landlords, BC tenants and the provincial government are looking for our feedback to help improve the BC rental industry.

Ontario landlords what are your experiences dealing with tenants with pets?

Many OLA members are pet owners and pet lovers and the current situation in British Columbia needs to change.

However, we advise our BC friends that it’s not as simple as a “make it illegal” for landlords to refuse pets.  It’s complicated and we want to help.

For example what about pet damages?

What if pets bother other tenants?

We want your feedback!

Let’s Help BC Create Fair Rules for BC Landlords and BC Tenants With Pets

There is talk that soon British Columbia landlords will have to follow the Ontario model. In BC some people want a “no pets” policy to be Human Rights Violation and the Residential Tenancy Act to not allow “no pets” policies.

Ontario Landlords know this is a complicated situation and so we ask you to share your thoughts. And sent them soon as new rules and legislation is on the way.

Mississauga Landlords Make Your Voice Heard – Secondary Unit Strategy Meeting

Monday, February 25th, 2013

February 24th, 2013

Mississauga Landlords Second Unit Implementation Strategy Public Meeting February 25th, 2013

On February 25th, 2013 Mississauga Landlords Can Make Your Voice Heard To Government on Secondary Suites

Mississauga landlords have been in the news recently. This time it’s good news.

-Are you a Mississauga landlord with an existing secondary suite?

-Would you like to add a secondary suite to your house to create a wealth through a rental stream?

-Are you considering buying a rental property with a secondary suite?

You have a chance to to make your voice heard on the Mississauga Secondary Unit Implementation Strategy

The city is having a public meeting on February 25th, 2013.

At this meeting you will have a chance to ask questions about the proposed new policy regarding secondary units. You will also have the opportunity to review the current proposals and provide important feedback to the government.

The Provincial Planning Act requires all Ontario municipalities to have policies regarding second units in homes.

Research Findings in the Report Include the Following Points:
1.There are real benefits of allowing second units 

Adding secondary units can help families pay their mortgage, help seniors remain in homes, and create a living space for relatives.

2. There is a real impact on Mississauga neighbourhoods

Secondary suites can create issues with parking, noise and other issues. This is dangerous because it can easily change the entire character of an existing, successful neighbourhood.

3. There are issues concerning safety

This is a serious concern. There are many current illegal units which do not meet either the Fire Code or the Building Code. Licensing second units can prevent this. Units currently ‘under the radar’ will surface and be required to meet safety requirements.

To view the report on feedback and thoughts on the strategy over 5 workshops held by the city, click here.

For more information contact the City of Mississauga at

300 City Centre Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5B 3C1
Customer Service: Call 3-1-1 (905-615-4311 outside city limits)

Mississauga Landlords Make Sure Your Voice Is Heard! To Discuss This And Other Ontario Landlord Issues Go To The Free Landlord Forum for Ontario Landlords!

Tenant from Hell Launches Appeal to Stop Eviction

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

May 23, 2012

A True “Tenant from Hell”

A couple of weeks ago Star reporter Emily Mathieu wrote an article about a “Tenant from Hell” named Nina Willis.

It really was one of the best mainstream media stories about the rental industry published in years.   Thanks Emily!  You have lots of fans across Ontario!

One of the landlords in the story who had been victimized by Nina Willis  joined the Ontario Landlords Association to receive help.  Virginia received the help she needed and managed to get Willis to move! 

Here’s the scam.  Nina Willis passes herself off as a wonderful tenant, friendly, well-spoken, clean as hell and comes with glowing references, according to her many previous landlords.

Once inside the games begin.  She starts by failing  to pay rent, or pays only portions, and uses board rules that allow her to raise maintenance issues with absolutely no warning to delay the process and appeals her eviction orders.

Nina has duped landlord after landlord into renting to her. The Star found that provincial privacy legislation stopped small landlords from learning that she had a crazy record before at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

It’s Great That Nina is Finally Evicted and Her Last Landlord Can Try to Recover and Re-coup His Losses

Who said she’s been evicted? 

Many small landlords  praise Vincent Ching as one of the most professional and fair adjudicators at the Landlord and Tenant Board.  Last month board adjudicator Ching said he failed to find Willis “credible in any way” and said that if she didn’t pay what she owed by the she would be evicted.

The problem is Mr. Ching’s word is not the final verdict.

You Mean Nina Willis Still Hasn’t Been Evicted?!

She’s still in the rental property of her current landlord.  Can you imagine the stress the landlord feels?

How Did She Manage to Stay?

A tenant from hell (Nina Willis) with a track record of bounced cheques and eviction notices has done it again.  She staved off eviction with an appeal to Divisional Court.  Court records and interviews with past landlords, lawyers and paralegals confirm tenant Nina Willis, 48, has been ordered out of at least six homes since 2005. However, the Landlord and Tenant Board says it cannot release her record of many appearances before the board.

Last week Willis filed a notice of appeal to Divisional Court, announcing she intended to fight the most recent eviction ruling, this one from Landlord and Tenant Board adjudicator Vincent Ching.

By submitting the paperwork Willis’s eviction from a Don Mills home — scheduled for the end of the month — was (Get This!) automatically put on hold.

Willis has been living inside a home in Don Mills since August 2011, failing to pay rent to landlord Darius Vakili for many of those months.

In her court pleadings, Willis is asking for a new hearing, alleging the board ordered her out because of a factual “error” and she didn’t have an “opportunity to participate” in her hearing.

Willis has asked for an opportunity to present “oral evidence” heard at the board. She will have to order a CD of the hearing, which will need to be transcribed by a court reporter.

Once the transcript is ready she will have two months to assemble and file her documents before a date will be set, according to appeal guidelines from Divisional Court.

What Does the Landlord and Tenant Board and the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Have to Say About This?

The Landlord and Tenant Board has declined to comment further on Willis’s case or board procedures.

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing has defined the board as an “independent, quasi-judicial, arm’s-length body that sets its own procedures” and said questions about practices should be directed to it.

Ministry spokesperson Richard Stromberg said in an email that because the appeal was before the courts it would be “inappropriate” to comment.

Is the Ontario System Really This Out of Touch With Reality?  How Can the Landlord Survive Financially?

Sadly, yes.  The entire system governing the Ontario rental industry is broken.  Nina Willis is just one of many tenants who use the current system to punish landlords.

Things Need to Change.  And Fast!

Landlords need access to any previous cases involving tenants.   The Landlord and Tenant Board must become more efficient.  The Residential Tenancy Act needs to change.

It’s very risky to become a landlord in Ontario in 2012.  If you decide to do so, screening is key.  Or invest elsewhere where you you and your investment is appreciated.

Discuss this on the Ontario Landlords Advice forums here.