Archive for the ‘Good Tenant Tips’ Category

Wednesday, April 14th, 2021

Tenants Speak Out & Share Their Concerns & Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements.

Most of us used to rent to and we have tried to become the landlords we always wanted to rent from but could never find.

These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association.

We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry in a win-win business relationship.

To contribute your experiences and advice please email us at:  tenantexperiences@groupmail.com (All contributions must be a minimum of 300 words and include your name, contact number, address, a copy of your lease, all which will all be kept private and destroyed upon confirmation.)

The post below has been recommended by the Tenant Community as extremely helpful and important information. 

By Working Together Tenants And Small Landlords Can Get A Better Understanding of the Issues And Improve The Ontario Rental Industry.

Let’s all face issues straight on and work to make the Ontario Rental Industry not only an example for Canada, but for the world!

 

TENANT GAME CHANGER! TENANTS CAN NOW REPORT YOUR LANDLORDS AND LEAVE REVIEWS ANONYMOUSLY! (Without Consent)

Tuesday, April 13th, 2021

There Is A Great New Company That Gives Tenants The Power To Rate Their Landlord! You Can Post Anonymously And Consent Is Not Required! Click On GOOD NEIGHBOUR For Justice!

We’ve heard about so many slimy landlord “help” companies over the past few years. It’s open-season on Tenants!

Whether it’s creating secret bad tenant lists or promising defamatory ways to “kick the asses” of Tenants these companies are not even really helping landlords, but they appeal to landlords’ worst instincts.

As expected, they have a lot of “pumpers” providing misinformation to get their cut of the pie at the expense of good landlords. It’s all about the $$$$.

It’s a shame even good landlords are getting suckered in and will they will pay for their actions soon. It’s just a matter of time, you will see.

Now Tenants Can Fight Back Against Bad Landlords And Their Misleading, Slimy Services

Great news for Tenants and good landlords with a new site that empowers Tenants to report and review your landlords anonymously and without their consent!

The Company is Called “Good Neighbour” And It’s A Game Changer

This amazing app is free and here’s what they are all about:

-Learn about your future home from those who have lived in the unit before you.

-Share your rental experiences anonymously with others.

-Share your wisdom.

Get The Truth Told! Personal Experiences Are Key!

Apartment listings don’t paint the full picture.

-What’s the landlord like?

-What about the neighbours?

-Is the management company helpful?

-What’s it like living in the neighbourhood?

Share your experience (anonymously) to help your future neighbours.

You don’t need your landlords’ consent 8-)

Why Can’t We Report Landlords To Credit Bureaus Like Landlords Do?

Because the whole reporting thing is a marketing scam and basically useless!

The whole “report Tenants to the credit bureaus to raise or drop their score” isn’t true like some companies are marketing.

It’ ridiculous and just marketing campaign to get naïve, desperate landlords to pay money and give them the fake illusion of power, LOL!

The dirty little secret the shills won’t tell you is landlords reporting tenants rent doesn’t dent the Tenants’ credit score beyond a small, tiny way that has have no real impact!

It’s basically useless and total gaslighting and won’t help or harm credit scores except in a very, very tiny fashion.  People think this reporting will play a big role in a tenants credit score, but it’s not true!

Sadly so many have been misled and so many small landlord shills are misleading landlords to try to catch some ca$h.

So no need for Tenants to follow this marketing scam! The real way is to review your landlords and tell the truth about them! This will help good landlords and protect us from the slumlords out there!

 

JOIN NOW…IT’S FREE! REVIEW ALL YOUR LANDLORDS, EVEN PREVIOUS LANDLORDS!

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THIS HELPS LANDLORDS BECAUSE GOOD REVIEWS WILL HELP THEM FIND GOOD TENANTS!

GOOD LANDLORDS ARE GOING TO BE REWARDED!

IT’S A KICK TO THE A** OF BAD LANDLORDS WHO NEED TO CHANGE THEIR WAYS OR BE PUNISHED

CLICK ON GOOD NEIGHBOUR, IT’S FREE!

https://usegoodnbr.com/

 

Call the Ontario Tenant Police Force To Get Your Landlord FINED Or ARRESTED in 2021

Thursday, April 1st, 2021

Landlords Obey The Law Or Suffer The Consequences! Tenants Have Rights!

I wrote about this a year ago and am shocked more people are not using this service!

Tenants are under attack!

How can we fight back?

Ontario Tenants are not aware there is a “Ontario Tenant police force” run by the provincial government to help you and punish your landlord for illegal acts!

It’s almost like the the so called “tenant groups” taking government money and province don’t want tenants to know about this service. And there is rarely anything in the media. Why?

Hmmmmmmm. It’s almost like landlords work to keep tenants blind and naive about our rights while they look down on us and just want our money.

WE ARE ABOUT GETTING TENANTS TRULY INFORMED

– There is a service that will protect our rights! But most Tenants don’t even know about it! It’s time to make every Tenant in Ontario aware of this service!

 

Want proof?   Take a look:

(1) Waterloo Landlord And Property Manager Fined $5200 For Not Return Key Deposit

Waterloo tenants saved.

June 21, 2019 10:30 A.M.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing

Convicted: 2526328 Ontario Inc. and Turn Key Property Management Inc.

Location: Region of Waterloo

Description of Offence: Three counts against each defendant of charging an illegal key deposit

Date of Conviction: June 17, 2019

Penalty Imposed:

Following a guilty plea, 2526328 Ontario Inc. and Turn Key Property Management Inc. were each fined a total of $2,250 by Justice of the Peace Michael A. Cuthbertson.

The court also imposed victim fine surcharges totalling $375 for each defendant as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The victim fine surcharges go to a special fund to assist victims of crime.

Background:

2526328 Ontario Inc. is the landlord of a rental property in Waterloo.

Turn Key Property Management Inc. manages the property for the landlord.

In February and March 2017, six tenants signed leases to rent units in the property. Each tenant was charged a $200 key deposit.

Under the Residential Tenancies Act, a landlord may charge a refundable key deposit in an amount not greater than the expected direct replacement costs of the key.

2526328 Ontario Inc. did not refund the key deposits to three of the tenants when they moved out of their units.

Turn Key Property Management Inc. did not refund the key deposits to the other three tenants when they moved out of their units.

After the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing laid charges, 2526328 Ontario Inc. and Turn Key Property Management Inc. refunded the key deposits to the tenants.

(2) Toronto Landlord Fined $48,000 for Residential Tenancies Act Violations

Convicted: 795 College Inc.

Location: Toronto

Description of Offence: Three counts of failing to afford a tenant a right of first refusal

Date of Conviction: May 23, 2019

Penalty Imposed:

  • Following a guilty plea, 795 College Inc. was fined a total of $48,000 in Toronto by Justice of the Peace David. J. Hunt.
  • The court also imposed a 25 per cent victim fine surcharge ($12,000) as required by the Provincial Offences Act.

Background:

  • 795 College Inc. is the landlord of an eight-unit apartment building.
  • In late 2016, 795 College Inc. gave the tenants notice to end their tenancies to do extensive renovations.
  • Tenants may have a “right of first refusal” to move back into the rental unit once renovations are complete by giving written notice to the landlord before moving out. The rent when the tenant moves back in must be the same as if there had been no interruption in the tenancy.
  • Tenants in three rental units gave written notice to 795 College Inc. that they wanted to move back in once renovations were complete.
  • In November 2017, 795 College Inc. rented the three units to different tenants at over three times the previous rent. The previous tenants did not move back in.
  • In addition to the fines imposed by the Court, the Landlord and Tenant Board ordered 795 College Inc. to pay administrative fines totaling $75,000 for not letting the previous tenants move back in.

(3) Simcoe County Landlord Fined $1,500 for Residential Tenancies Act Violation

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing

Convicted: Casino R.V Resorts Inc.

Location: Simcoe County

Description of Offence: Withholding the reasonable supply of heat to a tenant

Date of Offence: September 1, 2018 — June 15, 2019

Date of Conviction: December 16, 2019

Penalty Imposed:

  • Following a guilty plea, Casino R.V Resorts Inc. was fined $1,500 in Orillia by Justice of the Peace Karen Walker.
  • The court also imposed a 25 per cent victim fine surcharge ($375) as required by the Provincial Offences Act.

Background:

  • Casino R.V Resorts Inc. is the landlord of a rental property in Simcoe County.
  • In early 2018, the furnace in the basement of the property stopped working.
  • Casino R.V Resorts Inc. did not repair the furnace despite requests from the tenant. The furnace was still not repaired during the period from September 1, 2018 to June 15, 2019.
  • Under the Residential Tenancies Act, landlords are not permitted to withhold the reasonable supply of heat to a tenant between September 1 and June 15. During this period, rental units must be maintained (or capable of being maintained) at a temperature of at least 20 degrees Celsius.

Tenants Are Not Aware Of This Important Weapon To Fight Evil,  Illegal Landlords

We wrote about how Tenants have a “tenant police force” that almost nobody know about before- https://ontariolandlords.org/forum/view … 8454399aa7

Of course the gov’t paid for high salaried “tenant activists” will never tell you the truth, as they might lose their funding and huge salaries.

As Lenin said, control the opposition and you win. This is what the landlords have done, created what looks like tenant groups fighting for us but in reality they are just there to stop us and bog us down and make us lose!

So many options for Tenants are hidden and rarely ever publicized. Our collective is talking about REAL HELP AND REAL ACTION, not flowery words and inaction.

The so-called “tenant groups” out there are getting government funding and never want to rock the boat and risk that funding. Do they care about Tenant Rights, or do they just want to keep getting their big pay checks to “talk about Tenant Rights” and mislead us and make us WEAK!?

This is why this site will now become the go-to Tenants Rights site in Ontario and we are working hard to grow it all over Canada.

ONTARIO TENANTS DID YOU KNOW THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT HAS SOMETHING CALLED “RENTAL ENFORCEMENT UNIT?”

This is part of the Ministry of Housing, meaning the provincial government. It used to be called “THE INVESTIGATIONS AND ENFORCEMENT UNIT” but the name was suspiciously changed recently.

DID YOU KNOW?

– IF YOUR LANDLORD IS BREAKING THE RULES YOU CAN AVOID THE LONG AND TEDIOUS LANDLORD AND TENANT BOARD AND GET FAST ACTION

– MAKE YOUR LANDLORD CHANGE THEIR BEHAVIOR Immediately OR GET YOUR LANDLORD FINED (OR EVEN CRIMINALLY CHARGED!)

– THE RENTAL ENFORCEMENT UNIT WILL EVEN CALL YOU LANDLORD AND WARN THEM OR FACE THE CONSEQUENCES!

If you are a tenant of a rental property in Ontario, the Rental Housing Enforcement Unit can help you by:

-listening to your complaint
-explaining your rights and responsibilities under the Act
-working with you and your landlord or tenant to resolve issues
-carrying out formal investigations when issues cannot be resolved fining or criminally charging your landlord

So what are some of the offences landlords do that will lead to huge fines and even criminal charges?

-disconnecting or interfering with a vital service that the landlord is required to supply to tenants (e.g. heat, electricity, fuel, gas or water)

-failing to provide rent receipts to tenants who request them

-illegally evicting a tenant without following the eviction process

-failing to make a tenant’s belongings available within 72 hours of eviction

-collecting unlawful security deposits

-altering the locking system for a rental unit or residential complex without giving the tenant replacement keys

-providing false or misleading information in documents filed with the Landlord and Tenant Board

-Not providing proper notice to come into your home

-Taking pictures in your home when you do not agree

-Having real estate agents keep bothering you with no proper notice and harassment

-Tons of other offenses under the Residential Tenancies Act (basically anything your landlord does that you fee is unfair…..report them!)

HOW DO I GET THE RENTAL ENFORCEMENT UNIT TO CALL MY LANDLORD AND WARN THEM, FINE THEM OR CRIMINALLY CHARGE THEM?

Landlords and tenants in Ontario may report any offence under the Act by contacting our call centre.

Telephone: 416-585-7214
Toll-free telephone: 1-888-772-9277

Call centre hours:
Monday – Friday
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Check it out at: http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/page142.aspx

DO IT! PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY!

Already the Ontario website seems be trying to mislead Tenants on rights. But the reality is you can report your landlord and not only teach them a “life lesson” being fined or being jailed, but you are helping get rid of these bad landlords who hate tenants.

If you have any problems with your landlord and want fast action, call the ONTARIO GOVERNMENT RENTAL ENFORCEMENT UNIT, FREE OF CHARGE, AND START THE INVESTIGATION INTO YOUR LANDLORDS ACTIONS.

Together we are stronger.

And tenants are united on telling the truth to help Tenants on this forum (and not a government funded tenant site that is bought and paid for with big pay checks and won’t tell Tenants the real truth about how we can protect ourselves!)

Abused tenants can get justice.

And Bad Landlords will pay the price!

DO NOT BE AFRAID!

Your complaint is confidential and you have nothing to fear!

As more tenants use this helpful service there will be more and more huge fines and especially MANY MORE criminal charges against landlords.  This will improve the rental industry, especially as more slumlords and landlords who abuse their power will be in jail!

Report Your Landlord For Any Dispute You Have! It’s A Free Ontario Government Service! You Have Nothing To Lose, and It’s Confidential!

Toll-free telephone: 1-888-772-9277

‘Free benefit’ or blacklisted? Hamilton tenants and landlords clash over private information

Monday, March 29th, 2021

‘Free benefit’ or blacklisted? Hamilton tenants and landlords clash over private information

..

Seven tenants of a Hamilton apartment building say their personal information — including their names and rent payment histories — was taken by their landlord and submitted to a company without their consent.

The landlord, Live Well Property Management Ltd., entered the information into a database run by the Landlord Credit Bureau (LCB), a newly-licensed consumer reporting agency that boasts over 30,000 landlord and tenant users across North America.

The LCB tracks tenants’ payment habits and then transfers that data to Equifax, a multinational credit reporting agency which — through the information provided by the LCB — can either boost or lower a tenant’s credit score based on how promptly they pay their rent.

While some residents say their privacy has been breached, others worry about the consequences.

Dave Pace-Bonello and his partner Joey Nicole and their son Julian. They have lived at the building -- 94 East Ave. S. -- for 20 years.

The LCB database keeps a list of individual tenant records which — besides a name, email, address and rent history, among other pieces of data — contains reviews written by landlords detailing their experiences with a given tenant.

“If we paid our rent late because our paycheque didn’t land on the first of the month, what would that do to our credit?” asked Dave Pace-Bonello, who has lived in three-storey building at 94 East Ave. S. for the past two decades.

“If our landlord writes a bad review about us just because he doesn’t like us, and another landlord sees that, what does that do to our chances of finding another home?”

The residents at 94 East were informed they had been registered to the service through emails sent to them by the LCB within the past year.

The emails framed the bureau as a “free benefit” for tenants and an opportunity for them to get “an advantage over other applicants” on future lease applications.

Residents who are late with rent, leave without proper notice or cause damages “will likely find it more difficult to obtain tenancy and credit in the future as this information is shared with other landlords and credit bureaus,” the emails say.

Zachary Killam, president and CEO of the LCB, told The Spectator consent is not always required to collect a tenant’s data.

He said the company’s standing as a consumer reporting agency gives it the lawful right to gather information without consent insofar as a debt is owed or an agreement has been breached.

Ann Cavoukian, a former Ontario privacy commissioner, called the collection of information without consent an “appalling” practice.

While she sympathizes with landlords who want a resource to recoup late rent payments, she said such a resource can’t be created at the expense of tenants who are unaware their personal information is being shared.

“Everything has to be totally upfront with people understanding what they’re getting into,” said Cavoukian.

According to the LCB’s privacy policy, it can collect all sorts of data about tenants in addition to outstanding rent and landlord reviews, including IP addresses, passport and driver’s licence numbers, social insurance and security numbers, marital status and job history.

Killam said the LCB “does not currently collect all of those,” but did not specify what information is collected or how.

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada has launched an investigation into alleged privacy breaches committed by the LCB.

Spokesperson Vito Pilieci couldn’t comment on the status of the probe, but said federal legislation typically requires “meaningful consent” for the collection, use or disclosure of information.

Dave Pace-Bonello, his partner Joey Nicol and their son Julian in their apartment at 94 East Ave. S., where the family has lived for two decades. Pace-Bonello warned neighbours private information was taken by their landlord and submitted to a consumer reporting agency without their consent.

‘You have no reason to be worried’

Pace-Bonello and his longtime partner, Joey Nicol, asked Live Well management several times to remove their information off the LCB.

All but one request went unheeded.

In one email exchange dated March 24, 2020, Nicol asked her landlord, Matt Christie, why the couple’s information was taken without consent and to remove it from the LCB database.

“You have no reason to be worried,” replied Christie, who is listed as a director of Live Well in corporate records. “(You) always pay your rent on time and when you log in to LCB you will see that’s what has been recorded for you.”

A back-and-forth ensued.

“Consent is not required,” wrote Christie in a May 1 text to Pace-Bonello after Pace-Bonello again said he did not consent to the couple’s information being taken.

“I sent your request to the landlord. I’ll let you know the response once I have it,” he added.

“… and consent is 100 per cent not required.”

An excerpt of a text exchange between 94 East Ave. S. tenant Dave Pace-Bonello and his landlord, Matt Christie, who is a director of Live Well Property Management Ltd. Christie refuses to take Pace-Bonello's tenant information off the LCB database and says consent was not required to collect it.

By July 9, Christie agreed to remove the couple’s record from the LCB database, which included their names, move-in dates, email addresses, rent amount and address. He told them in an email that if rent ever went unpaid in the future, Live Well might reopen their record.

The ordeal left the couple deflated.

“It made me not trust our landlord anymore,” said Nicol of Christie. “I didn’t understand why he was so invested in the LCB but not in us, his tenants. He knew our concerns and he still didn’t address them, and he made me feel combative for sticking up for our family.”

Another tenant at 94 East, who asked not to be named for fear of retribution from Live Well, said she also struggled to remove her information off the LCB.

In one email with Marv Steier, a co-founder of the LCB who is no longer with the company, the tenant asked why she had to provide her SIN if the LCB reports to her credit agency.

“Your landlord is reporting your rent payments for your benefit,” wrote Steier in the email in late April 2020.

“I don’t want this ‘free benefit,’” the tenant replied. “My credit score has been over 800 for years, how would this benefit me?”

The tenant told The Spectator she didn’t consent to have her information collected and asked both the LCB and Live Well to have it removed. She said she never got a clear answer as to whether her record was deleted.

The Spectator posed several questions to Christie concerning the allegations that Live Well took tenants’ information without consent.

He responded with a statement about Pace-Bonello and Nicol.

“We’ve worked hard and considerably improved the standard of the building they live in and assisted them as needed, yet been subject to ongoing derogatory, rude and bullying behaviour from them towards our team,” Christie said via email.

Is the LCB impartial?

Ontario’s Consumer Reporting Act states if a credit agency collects negative or unfavourable information about an individual, there must be some form of effort on the part of the agency to corroborate that information.

The LCB said it does not accept anonymous information on its database and users’ identifications are verified prior to posts. They added landlord and tenant reviews are vetted by staff to ensure foul language and personal attacks are omitted.

“We do not allow false or vindictive reporting,” said Killam, the CEO, who noted consent from tenants is also required before a future landlord can look at their records.

However, it’s difficult to differentiate unfavourable information from fact if that information is subjective, argued Benjamin Reis, a housing lawyer with Downtown Legal Services at the University of Toronto.

“Information put into a consumer report must be based on the best available evidence,” said Reis. “Asking, ‘Tell me what you think about this tenant?’ is not what I think would be best evidence.

“What if we found out that the reason a landlord said, ‘Yes, I have a problem with this person,’ is because the landlord has a problem with people of colour? That’s quite possible.”

Killam said users are contractually bound to be non-discriminatory on the LCB platform. He also said tenants can access their own records and dispute them.

But a section of the LCB’s tenant record form — where landlords are asked six ‘yes or no’ questions about a person’s tenancy — puts that claim of impartial access under scrutiny.

A screenshot of a tenant's record form on the LCB database that is shared with landlord but not tenants.

“This information is NOT SHARED with the tenants but is shared with other landlords who search this tenant,” reads a disclaimer atop the questions, which range from whether the tenant paid rent late or were tried at court for breaching a lease agreement, to property damages or noise complaints.

Reis argued a company can’t claim to be impartial if it allows access to information to one set of users but not the other.

“This idea of a secret list where tenants don’t know if they’re on it, don’t know what was said about them or by who, that’s what most people think about when they think about a blacklist,” said Reis, adding “yes or no” questions also point to the LCB’s lack of due diligence.

“Instead of asking ‘yes or no’ whether the tenant was taken to court, why not include a copy of the decision so people get the facts?”

Douglas Kwan, director of advocacy and legal services of Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario, echoed similar remarks about the LCB allowing landlord reviews.

“If you’re solely interested in a tenant’s ability to pay the rent, which is what their website says, what is the purpose of these reviews?” asked Kwan. “A landlord can make lots of comments that really have no place or doesn’t speak to whether a tenant can pay their rent.”

Both Reis and Kwan took issue with what they consider to be a conflict of interest in the LCB’s leadership.

According to corporate records obtained by The Spectator, Killam is one two directors at Live Well Property Management Ltd., which owns several properties in Hamilton and the GTA.

Killam said he hasn’t been actively involved with Live Well since 2018.

“There has never been a conflict of interest,” he said. “LCB is impartial and judicious in its operations and services.”

Reis argued the connection raises questions about neutrality, particularly with respect to consumer reporting agencies.

“Credit agencies like Equifax and TransUnion are institutions people are supposed to trust. But what if they were owned by someone who is also a director at a credit card company?” Reis asked.

“If Bell or Rogers claimed I owed a bill that I didn’t actually owe, I would expect that Equifax not be owned by Bell or Rogers.”

The LCB sues critical tenants

Killam and the LCB sued Pace-Bonello and Nicol for defamation and copyright infringement on Jan. 14.

According to a statement of claim filed in the Supreme Court of British Columbia — a province where the LCB is listed under a different name than the corporation number registered in Ontario — the couple “sought to damage the business and reputation of the LCB and their directors” by creating a website that contains information about the agency.

The website is alleged to have accused the LCB of unlawful and unethical conduct, the claim states, and infringed the trademark and copyright of the LCB.

The agency is seeking a permanent injunction restraining the couple from ever writing or publishing information about the LCB that it believes to be defamatory.

Pace-Bonello, who plans to defend himself at the hearing, said he created the website in June after months of haggling with Live Well to remove his information from the LCB.

It was intended to be a resource for tenants at 94 East who received the same unprompted LCB registration email as the couple did.

“We thought about how many of our neighbours also received that email and had no clue what was going on,” he said.

Dave Pace-Bonello, his partner Joey Nicol and their son Julian. The family has lived at 94 East Ave. S. for 20 years.

The website contains detailed information about the LCB, its terms of service, and what rights tenants have related to consent. There is a disclaimer at the end of each post noting the website is not legal advice and for “community educational” purposes.

It received plenty of traction from neighbours, Pace-Bonello said.

One tenant at 94 East, who asked not to be named for fear of retribution from Live Well, said the site helped give context to that initial email from the LCB.

“If it weren’t for Dave and Joey, we wouldn’t know what (the LCB) was or why we should care or what our rights were,” said the tenant, who has lived in the building for three decades.

Pace-Bonello said he can understand why the LCB isn’t happy with the website — but he can’t understand why they are trying to silence him.

“They’re entitled to respond, absolutely. But to respond in a way that no further conversation can ever happen again, that doesn’t make any sense to me as a Canadian,” he said.

“When you see that someone wants to go to that length with you, rather than answer some of these questions and address these concerns in public, it’s shocking and it’s scary. It’s like the whole bottom falls out.”

For further reading click on Landlord Credit Bureau Facts.

TENANTS CAN NOW GET A FREE LAWYER TO HELP YOU FIGHT YOUR LANDLORD!

Monday, March 1st, 2021

EVICTION HELP: THE TENANT-LAWYER CONNECTION PORTAL

There was an excellent story by CBC news explaining how Tenants can now get free legal help from an Ontario lawyer.

YES, FREE LEGAL HELP FROM AN ONTARIO LAWYER.

Unlike the venomous “work for the highest bidder” low-life legal reps that want to evict tenants, hurt families and destroy lives, there are lots of good lawyers out there.

They are successful already and don’t have to be “bottom-feeders” like what many landlords are hiring to try to destroy tenant lives. Tenants face so many scary challenges these days. It ranges from defamation and illegal tenants lists (direct link here)  to landlords not keeping the rental property safe from fires.

Good lawyers believe in justice and fairness and they can protect you from the low-class sharks that are used as weapons against Tenants during the current corrupt LTB Hearing system.

They aren’t desperate to make a “quick buck” abusing the system to please their landlord paymasters.

A Lawyer Is Like Your Bodyguard Against Landlord Bullies!

“DON’T BULLY MY CLIENT LANDLORD! OBEY THE LAW OR GET WRECKED!”

Having your own lawyer makes sure your landlords treat you with respect! If they think you are weak they will bully you, but if they know you are protected they will change their tune fast!

The Ontario Bar Association has launched a new pro bono legal service to help tenants at risk of losing their homes when residential evictions resume across the province in the coming weeks.

The enforcement of eviction orders was paused in Ontario when the provincial government introduced a stay-at-home order on Jan. 14 to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Evictions have since resumed across most of the province, though the moratorium will remain for Toronto, Peel Region and North Bay-Parry Sound until at least March 8.

Ontario’s Landlord and Tenant Board is expected to begin processing a growing backlog of cases as enforcement resumes more widely across the province.

“There will be a wave of hearings,” said Doug Ferguson, the bar association’s chair of pro bono work.

“And there will be a wave of evictions.”

The new service offers 30 minutes of free legal advice for tenants facing eviction hearings.

‘Tenants are stuck’

Ferguson said lawyers who volunteer for the program will walk clients through their tenant rights, and help them to negotiate agreements with landlords, such as deferring payments or delaying an eventual move-out date.

The goal, he said, is to better prepare tenants for hearings that have the potential to fundamentally disrupt their lives.

“The tenants are stuck,” Ferguson said. “When you don’t have the legal training or the information you need, it makes it very difficult to make your point.”

The bar association says it has enough volunteer lawyers to assist 100 clients per week. Some tenants in particularly complicated situations may receive more than the 30 minutes of free counsel, if the lawyer agrees to help them further.

The provincial government says it encourages tenants and landlords to reach “fair arrangements,” such as deferring rent or finding alternative payment arrangements.

Thousands of Toronto tenants facing evictions

Renters across Canada have reported difficulty making their rent throughout the pandemic, mainly due to job losses and increased economic instability.

A survey released in January by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation found that rent arrears increased nationally due to COVID-19, with 58.3 per cent of survey respondents reporting a higher rent arrears rate in 2020 than the previous year.

Toronto recorded the highest arrears rate, with 34,858 units, more than 10 per cent of the city’s rental stock, in arrears in 2020. The estimated amount of unpaid rent reached $55 million in Toronto last year.

Kiri Vadivelu is among the thousands of local tenants in arrears and now facing eviction. He hasn’t paid rent at his Scarborough apartment since April 2020 when he lost his job as a security guard.

“It is extremely, extremely frightening because if my landlord can evict me, I have no means to pay, and I have [nowhere] to go. What am I going to do?” said Vadivelu.

He and his wife are awaiting the birth of their first child this spring.

“I’m afraid our family is going to be homeless.”

Vadivelu is also an organizer with the tenant advocacy group Toronto ACORN, which has called on the provincial government to ban all residential evictions, hearings and orders until the pandemic ends.

The Ontario NDP has made similar demands.

Ferguson, of the bar association, did not echo those calls, though he did raise similar concerns about the possibility of tenants across the province being pushed out of their homes.

“At this point in the pandemic, to have thousands of people homeless cannot be good for our communities,” he said.

“Not good for public health and not good for our economy.”

Don’t Estimate The Depths Landlord Desperate Legal Reps Will Go!

“I will evict each and everyone of these tenants so I can finally make enough cash to buy my Ferrari and Miami beach luxury condo!”

Tenants know that landlords (including small landlords) are hiring expensive legal help to try to steamroll Tenants and kick us out of our homes.

Get Help Here.

With LTB hearings now online, many Tenants claim adjudicators (judges) at the Landlord and Tenant Board are stomping on our legal and human rights!

Make sure you get a free lawyer and make sure your landlord knows you have a lawyer helping you so they must RESPECT YOU!