Archive for the ‘Bad Tenants’ Category

Residential Tenancies Act Has Changed – Good News For Landlords & Tenants

Tuesday, July 21st, 2020

Bill 184 Has Passed And It Helps Protect Small Landlords

Many small “mom and pop” landlords have faced huge challenges the last four months. This includes our own personal challenges due to the pandemic.

It’s been a very stressful period but there is some good news that will help us run our rental businesses in more efficient manner. It also helps tenants deal with some of the ‘bad apple’ investors out there.

Win-Win For Good Landlords and Good Tenants

The Ontario government on May 26 brought forward Bill 184 for the second reading that small landlords had been waiting for. It has now passed and it’s now the law.

It is a Bill to improve the Residential Tenancies Act. This included changes we’ve told the government need to happen to protect small hard-working landlords across Ontario and avoid a mass sell-off!

These are difficult times for everyone. So many people are out of work and many have even been fired from their jobs. We know this and the new changes work to help everyone.

Bill 184 Is Called “The Protecting Tenants and Strengthening Community Housing Act 2020”

Despite the name, this bill makes some positive changes for landlords.

How?

For small landlords the the three most important changes are:

1. No More “Trial By Ambush”

Before this change in the law tenants were able to raise repair issues at eviction hearings without notifying the landlord of any problems first.

They didn’t need proof, they just had to bring up issues to get the Hearing cancelled and a new Hearing set for a later…usually many months later that many tenants still didn’t pay rent!

Many of our members faced unscrupulous and dirty tenant reps. who used what was intended to protect tenants instead to be a trick and legal weapon.

We have small landlords who even said dirty “reps” warned landlords “no house is perfect!” (meaning “I can ambush you to delay evictions!”) as a negotiating tactic to get landlords to pay money for tenants to move or they would use this to delay the eviction by months!

Now that Bill 184 passed, tenants need to give notice in writing of these complaints before a hearing occurs.  This will allow good landlords to make the repairs needed.

We have had thousands of reports of the years of tenant representatives bringing up imaginary “problems” with the rental property as a tactic to delay an eviction.

This has now ended and this dirty legal trick has been eliminated.

2. Allows Landlords To Pursue Tenants For Rent and Utilities Arrears Through the LTB, Instead of Small Claims Court

This is helpful because small claims court can take a lot of time to get a court date (up to a year or more) and you have to find your tenants to serve them.

Again, this will mostly help the large REIT corporate landlords who have their own legal teams. But it can help small landlords, especially when it comes to unpaid utilities.

3. Tenants Who Don’t Fulfill Their Payment Plans Get Evicted With No Hearing (which can take months)

When landlords apply to evict tenants for late rent, the tribunal can help mediate “payment plans” between the landlord and the tenant.

That sounds great. Not really. The problem is the mediation happens when the landlord finally gets a Hearing date at the landlord and tenant board.

Even before the corona virus, landlords had to wait months to get a Hearing date because of so many cases and too few LTB “adjudicators” (judges).

Under the new law, landlords and tenants can make their own “payment plans” together without having to wait months for an LTB Hearing.

If tenants are unable to fulfill the repayment agreements, landlords would not necessarily have to go back to the tribunal for an eviction hearing with the tenant. 

And tenants who tried to work with their landlord will get special consideration if it does go to a hearing versus tenants who simply refused to pay rent.

What About Helping Good Tenants?

There are changes that won’t impact good landlords but will help tenants deal with ‘bad apple’ investors.

For example, if you want to evict someone for your own use you have to give up your privacy rights and tell the LTB if you have done this before in the past couple years.

Since small landlords only use this option if they have children who need a place, or they sell their own property and move in to their rental to live, it won’t be an issue.

And fines for bad faith actions like”renovictions” have increased.

Most bad faith ‘renovictions” are from corporate landlords not from small landlords.

Good landlords want to cooperate with good tenants!

These new changes just strengthen this relationship by allowing landlords to act fast to deal with tenants who didn’t fulfill their side of the deal.

It also allows tenants more rights to fight against landlords trying to abuse the system.

This is a positive ‘first step’ in balancing the unbalanced pro-bad tenant policies create by the Liberals under McGuinty and Wynne.

New Laws Are Good, But Landlords Still Need More Changes

For example, the ability to charge damage deposits, shorter time frames for evictions for non payment and laws to protect landlords and tenants from those who are violent or abusive.

Small Residential Landlords Need Support

Saturday, April 25th, 2020

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We Explained And Premier Ford Gets It  – 

“A lot of them aren’t big landlords. They’re just hard-working people that might have a couple units that are trying to survive.”

Ontario Landlords Association members have been relentless in getting our message across to those in power. Our businesses are at stake!

We are working hard together to support fellow landlords and our tenants in need during this crisis. Wow, we’ve been working non-stop!

Via phone calls, emails, zoom meetings and more, our members across Ontario have been in constant regular contact with MPPs (including Cabinet Ministers), the Ministry of Housing, and even Premier Ford himself.

Protecting Small Landlords, Our Rental Businesses, And Our Tenants

Thanks to our members the message is getting through as Premier Ford stated his support for small residential landlords saying:

“A lot of them aren’t big landlords. They’re just hard-working people that might have a couple units that are trying to survive.”

Our message has been heard.  Loud and Clear.

Ontario Is Reopening Under The Guidance of Premier Ford

Ontario premier Doug Ford said he will announce details for a gradual reopening Ontario next week. He reiterated that the plan to restart the economy will be a slow process that unfolds in phases.

With May 1 approaching, Ontario Premier Doug Ford said today the province is asking the federal government to help with a residential rent relief program.

“Today, I’ll ask the prime minister to work with us on a program for residential tenants,” he said.

His announcement comes on the heels of prime minister Justin Trudeau detailing a program for commercial rent relief that the federal government is implementing in partnership with the provinces. Ford said the commercial rent relief program will cost $900 million.

Ford added that he will “push the federal government” on rent relief.

We’re doing it with businesses, now we need to do it with tenants and landlords for residents,” he added. “A lot of them aren’t big landlords. They’re just hard-working people that might have a couple units that are trying to survive.

He said the federal government has been a “fabulous” partner “but we need more. We need more for residential rent.

The Minister of Housing supports our cause saying “When these families are forced to choose between food and rent, it also impacts Ontario landlords and the stability of our rental housing sector.”

Clark wrote a request to help small residential landlords to the Trudeau government this week.

Your Voice Is Being Heard, Now We Need To Step On The Gas Pedal!

Small landlords have invested their savings and bought rental properties across the province. This has created hundreds of thousands of affordable, high quality rentals all over Ontario.

We need to be protected as we have put our faith into creating high quality rental properties…just like the properties we always wanted to rent!

Help Us Make Change to Protect Small Residential Landlords!

Let us know your thoughts and opinions and it will be sent to Premier Doug Ford and those in the top positions of power.

Ontario Landlord Angry As Tenant Leaves a Disaster

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

November 15th, 2012

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 Ontario Landlord Is Left With Huge Damages As Tenant Runs and Leaves a Disaster Behind

Meet landlord Jean-Guy Lecours. He’s a small business landlord with only one rental property.

What Happened?

Jen-Guy entered his rental property last month and was shocked at what he saw.

Oh No, I’ve Heard This Story Before

1 – He entered his house and saw the new light carpet he bought  now looked like  dirty soot.

2 – He saw the handles for the new windows he installed were ripped off. (And windows aren’t cheap!)

3 – He saw cigarette buttes mashed in the property furnace vents.

What Did He Do?

He told the tenants the property was a ‘pigpen’ and demanded they clean in and do the repairs.

Did They Do It?

No.

The landlord was forced to evict the tenants.

Who Were the Tenants?

They were a single mom with two kids and her ‘partner.’  The landlord eventually managed to evict them.

So His Problem Was Solved With the Eviction?

No, not at all.

The tenants left major damage to the property. The landlord has quotes of between $12,000 to up to $15,000 to get the property back to how it was before those tenants moved in. We’ve seen these kind of issues before.

Anything Else?

Yes.

The tenants owe him nearly $500 for the hydro bill and the city of Sarnia is going to charge him for collecting all the garbage.

How Much Garbage Was There?

Sarnia garbage collectors had to haul over sixty bags of garbage and old abandoned furniture after neighbours were disgusted and demanded it be cleaned up.

Surely He Can Get the Ex-Tenants to Pay for What They Did

The landlord is very pessimistic of every collecting.

Why Not Go the the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board?

When a tenant leaves a rental, the landlord can no longer go to the LTB.

So What Can He Do?

His only option is to go to Small Claims Court. However that is very difficult because the landlord must now track down the tenants to serve them.

Why Did Lecours Rent to These Tenants?

The landlord and his wife knew the tenants from their local church. The told him they needed a home to live in and assured him they would be great tenants. He fell for all the tricks which he would have avoided with a professional property management firm.

Despite some conflict during their tenancy, the landlord tried to be flexible to the tenants.  He even loaned them his mobile home so they could have a nice summer vacation.

What’s the State of the Property Now?

The landlords’ wife has been spending her days getting rid of garbage and cleaning the pigpen.

Will Lecours Continue to Be a Landlord?

Yes, although he promises to be careful when choosing tenants. He will begin doing employment and credit checks.

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This Is Another Warning Call to Ontario Landlords! Make Sure You Do Proper Tenant Screening and Do Credit Checks Before Handing Over the Key!