Ontario Landlords Association


Welcome to the OLA for Small Business Landlords

The Ontario Landlords Association (OLA) and its sister organization The Canada Landlords Association (CLA) are leading provincial and national organizations for private small residential landlords. We provide a unified voice for private landlords and promote and protect landlord interests to national and local government.

  • Network with top professionals
  • Get advice from experienced landlords
  • Learn how the Landlord and Tenant Board works
  • Meet our recommended partners
  • Take part in landlord activities, social events.
  • A chance to "get involved!"

Small Landlords Campaign To Make Sure Our Tenants “BEAT THE HEAT”

Experienced and successful small Ontario landlords know how important it is to rent to good long term tenants.

How Do You Keep Your Tenants Renting From You?

The key is to have a great property at an affordable price and then take care of your tenants and treat them like the 5 star clients they are.

Our members were shocked reading a story about how some corporate landlords were trying to evict their long term tenants just because they wanted a comfortable living environment and wanted to keep their air conditioners.

This is not how the landlord-tenant relationship should work

Unlike some corporate landlords who want to evict their tenants due to having air conditioners, we want to help our tenants “beat the heat” and be as comfortable in the summer as they are in winter. Many small landlords used to rent and we want to give our tenants what we always wanted.

Our Members are discussing this and already some great advice has popped up. For example:

“I make sure my windows are large and wide and with screens to keep out the mosquitos. My tenants appreciate the wind and breeze and it keeps them comfy and happy.”

“I own a single family home with central air. The tenants pay for their own usage and it’s been a win-win situation for years. Having central air is very attractive to prospective tenants.”

“Having efficient air conditioners in my units has led lots of great applicants wanting to rent from me.  Who wants to rent from a place that is too hot? That would suck!”

“I rented for years before buying my property and know how much I appreciated my landlord supplying an a/c when I couldn’t even afford one. Awesome landlord! I am now that Awesome landlord and making sure my tenants are happy!”

“I make sure my tenants know they can contact me whenever they want if they have any problems. If it’s too hot and the a/c is not working I make it a priority to get it fixed. Who can sleep when the whole world is getting hotter due to climate change!”

Working With Your Tenants Is Essential

By working together on all issues seeking win-win results small landlords can be very successful. While corporate landlords are often rigid, realizing that our tenants are human beings and our five-star clients and working together is the way to make your small “mom and pop” rental properties a success.

Join Our Community And Become A Successful Landlord

Join us in helping tenants “Beat The Heat” as small ‘mom and pop’ landlords in our community continue to lead the way to improve the rental industry for landlord-tenant fair relationships.

LTB News To Help You Succeed: Tribunals Ontario Portal – Update

TO:                 Landlord and Tenant Board Stakeholders

FROM:           Dawn Sullivan, Acting Associate Chair

                       Lindiwe Bridgewater, Acting Registrar

DATE:            August 3, 2022

RE:                 Tribunals Ontario Portal – Update

We are writing to share an update on the Tribunals Ontario Portal.

New process for receiving documents

Over the past two years, the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) has made significant progress in modernizing its services at a time where people expect user-friendly and convenient electronic options for interacting with government services.

To that end, we have added a button to the file summary page of the Tribunals Ontario Portal that allows parties to provide consent to receive documents from the LTB via the portal. By default, once a party logs into the portal the button is checked to indicate their consent. A user can uncheck the box if they want to receive communication from the LTB via regular mail. A user can also change their mind at any time about how they want to receive documents from the LTB by logging back into the portal and checking/unchecking the consent button.

If a user never logs on to the portal, they will continue to receive all correspondence from the LTB by regular mail.

Sending all correspondence by email and through the portal has benefits for both the LTB and the parties accessing LTB services. Parties will receive documents faster. The administrative burden is also reduced for LTB staff who track, print and mail out documents. This will allow them to focus on other areas that need attention to improve our service delivery.

We thank you for your continued patience as we actively work to improve our service timelines.

Sincerely,

Dawn Sullivan                                              Lindiwe Bridgewater

Acting Associate Chair                               Acting Registrar

Ontario Landlords- How Much Can I Raise the Rent in 2023?

Ontario Landlords Can Raise the Rent 2.5% in 2023

It’s a question small mom and pop landlords all over Ontario are asking.

In Ontario, landlords (in most cases) can only raise rent every year by a certain percentage that the provincial government allows.

In past years, this percentage was purely based on the Computer Price Index (CPI) which is a measure of inflation.

For example in 2012 the allowable increase was 3.1%

According to the Rent Increase Guideline explanation the CPI is a reliable and objective way to measure inflation, see a broad picture of changes in the price of goods and services in Ontario, and a sound way to set the annual rent increase.

In June 2012, the Wynne Liberal government put forward the Resident Tenancies Amendment Act to cap the maximum amount Ontario landlords can increase the rent for tenants occupying our rental properties. 

Our members were in contact with their MPPs and then Housing Minister Kathleen Wynne about this. Wynne wrote to the Ontario Landlords Association stating this would create stable rents for tenants while landlords will still get a “fair return” to maintain high quality rentals.

This means that despite inflation, higher taxes, higher costs and higher bills landlords can only raise the rent by 2.5% in 2023.

You cannot simply tell your tenants you are going to raise the rent. There are rules and procedures you must follow.

Rules For Raising the Rent

1. The 12 Month Rule

Landlords must wait at least 12 months after tenants move in before increasing the rent.

2. The 12 Month Rule Part II

All future increases must be 12 months apart from the last increase.

3. Proper Notice

Landlords must also provide tenants with written notice 90 days before the rent goes up.

4. Use the Notice of Rent Increase Form

The Landlord and Tenant Board website has a form N1 you can use to give notice about a rent increase.

Front Page Toronto Star – Ontario Landlords Campaign Against Discrimination

Let’s Make Sure Every Landlord In Ontario Follows The Human Rights Code And Doesn’t Discriminate in 2022

Many newcomers from around the world are arriving in Canada and deciding to rent a home before buying. Reasons can be to build a credit score to get a mortgage to wisely spending time to learn where they want to live before buying their own place.

Many Ontario landlords were surprised to read a story in the Toronto Star about a tenant applicant who was being discriminated against. Our members are still discussing this now!

This was an applicant most experienced and successful landlords would consider to potentially be an ideal tenant…someone we all want to rent from us!

(more…)

The Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA)

More and more of our members have succeeded with small rental investments and are now investing in larger units. And many of these larger units have elevators.

Ontario Landlords Association members are proud to make sure our members put “safety first” for all aspects of our rentals to protect tenants.

One our most most important requires for our members is to always make your properties safe for your tenants.

We never want to see tragedies happen that could have been avoided had the landlords been Ontario Landlords Association members.

TSSA reached out to us:

Dear Ontario Landlords Association And Our Safety Partners,

The Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) has released a communication providing an update on the new rule to enhance elevator availability in Ontario.

Here is the link to the news bulletin for information please.

Please feel free to reach out should you have any questions or concerns.

Thank you,

The Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA)

Become An OLA Member And Begin Running TVS Credit Checks For Only $10/Check!

Join the Ontario Landlords Association for a One-Time Registration Fee & Start Running TVS Credit Checks For for Only $10.00/Check.

A Huge Savings For Our Community Members!

Members of the Ontario Landlords Association follow the rules and work hard for win-win landlord-tenant relationships. Unlike other groups we stress the need for lawful tenant screening and have never had a bad tenant list. Landlords need to screen each applicant based on legal screening measures. The good news is you can run credit checks.

But not all credit checks are created equal.

There have been many opportunistic ‘start-ups’ who aren’t landlords offering services that are unstable and not what you want to use for your long term rental business success.

Toronto Star Ontario Landlords Use Credit Checks To Avoid Bad Tenants

Toronto Star – “Join a group such as the Ontario Landlords Association  where after becoming a member, you can do a credit check for as low as $10, and use their supporting materials to assist you.”

The Ontario Landlords Association is honoured to recommend our members to TVS – Tenant Verification Service Inc. For Big Discounts For Great Checks In North America

Tenant screening helps minimize the risk of renting to high-risk tenants and reduces the risk of rental income loss. This helps protect your rental investment.

TVS is a premier nationwide tenant screening service that offers a fast and efficient tenant screening service. We can:

  • provide a full credit report from Equifax
  • provide a background criminal check
  • safeguard your rental investment
Whether you are looking for a complete credit evaluation or comprehensive tenant screening, TVS provides 24/7 online access to a variety of consumer reports to meet your specific needs.
Credit reports provide valuable financial information and are great tools to evaluate your applicant’s payment habits and overall credit health.
TVS Criminal reports provide important insights that ensure you’re making better decisions on prospective tenants. Our background checks are essential tools to ensure a safer community and a protected property.

A consumer credit report can provide you with an overview of your applicant’s financial health.  You can see if they have overdue accounts, how much credit they have utilized and their history of payments.  This will help you to determine if they take their financial responsibilities seriously which is an indication of how they might treat their rental payments.

As a member of the Ontario Landlord Association, you pay only $10.00 for an Equifax Consumer Credit Report.

Run TVS Credit Checks For Success

All information received in the background investigation process will be remained by confidential, secured files with restricted access to only those who a need to know.

TVS credit checks give you tremendous information to allow you to make the right decision.

Take Control Of Your Rental Business and Succeed!

Tenants respect landlords who are professional and use the best services. They feel confident in you and will rent from you over other landlords who are not as professional.

A TVS report give you all the information you need to choose the best tenants for your property.

Non-Member Price: $21.58

OLA Members Price: $10.00 per check 

Become an OLA member for a one time community fee just to help us cover our costs and the savings is incredible when you run a premium credit check on your potential tenants with TVS!

Region of Peel Wants Input From Ontario Landlords Association Members

To Ontario Landlords Association Member Housing Stakeholders:

Peel Region’s Vacant Home Tax Public Industry Consultation Session on Tuesday, May 10 at 7 – 8:30 p.m. The session will be hosted and facilitated by Ernst and Young (EY), the Vacant Home Tax Consultants

OLA Members are invited to attend and participate in the Region’s Vacant Home Tax Public Industry Consultation Session on Tuesday, May 10 at 7 – 8:30 p.m. The session will be hosted and facilitated by Ernst and Young (EY), the Vacant Home Tax Consultants. 

Designed to provide housing industry leaders with information on the Vacant Home Tax program, the main goal of the session is to help the Region gather industry feedback to help in making informed decisions related to the design of a Vacant Home Tax program. We look forward to your attendance and participation. 

To learn more and complete the Vacant Home Tax survey, Ontario Landlords Association Members can log in at our MEMBERS FORUM.

Landlord & Tenant Board News For Small Landlords

TO:                  Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

SUBJECT:   Scheduling Update

 We are writing to provide you with an update on scheduling at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

We continue to hear all types of applications. In addition to scheduling previously adjourned matters and tenant merit applications, we are also scheduling merits hearings for newly filed landlord applications. We’d like to advise you of the following details:

  • Urgent matters will continue to be scheduled on a priority basis. If you believe your matter warrants an earlier hearing date, you can file a Request to Extend/Shorten Time.
  • Tenant merits hearings will continue to be scheduled in smaller blocks.

One adjudicator will be assigned to each block. One moderator and one dispute resolution officer will support each tenant merits block, allowing for same-day mediation.

  • L1s and L2s will also be scheduled in smaller blocks to ensure all matters get heard in the allotted time. The size of the blocks will increase incrementally over the summer and leading into the fall, and we will continue to monitor them to ensure that the appropriate number of matters are being scheduled for the allotted time.

One adjudicator will be assigned to each block. One moderator and one dispute resolution officer will support each block, allowing for same-day mediation.

  • Approximately 9-10 blocks will be scheduled each day, Monday to Thursday. L1s, and L2s and tenant merits, will be scheduled on alternating weeks (for example, week 1 will consist of L1 blocks, and week 2 will consist of L2 and tenant merit blocks).
  • Case management hearings and merits hearings for Above Guideline Increase applications continue to be scheduled.
  • Motions, reviews, and co-operative housing hearings also continue to be part of the schedule as required, as well as weekly French/bilingual hearings.
  • Online dispute resolution continues to be available for all applications filed in the Tribunals Ontario Portal. Routine mediation also continues to be available upon request for all application types. If you filed your application in the Tribunals Ontario Portal, you can make a request for routine mediation through the portal. For all other applications, you can email or mail your request to the applicable regional office.

Thank you for your continued patience as we work on service improvements. We are in the process of refining our scheduling model, and the updates provided above are part of that process.

In the coming weeks, we will be holding a stakeholder meeting where we will discuss our future scheduling plans and our work to improve service standards. As always, you’ll have an opportunity to provide feedback and ask questions at that meeting.

How To Speed Up Getting Your Landlord & Tenant Board (LTB) Hearing

Covid hit the province of Ontario hard. This led to the closings of courts and tribunals in 2020 leading to a huge backlog in cases.

While the LTB has made some important changes to help landlords in the past year, we are still faced with these long delays in getting an LTB Hearing. Many small landlords have gone for months not receiving any rent while their non-paying tenants remain in the property.

Small landlords need quicker access to justice. Fortunately the LTB has listened to our members comments and has created a way for small landlords to shorten the time to get a Hearing.

Join our expert discussion on this and other important topics in our landlord forums.

 

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 New Guideline and Updated Form

As discussed during our stakeholder meetings over the past months, the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) created Interpretation Guideline 22 regarding Covid-19 Issues, and updated its Request to Extend or Shorten Time form and accompanying instructions.

Interpretation Guideline 22 – Covid-19 Issues

This is a temporary Guideline that addresses issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic and will be revoked on a date to be determined by the LTB.

Interpretation Guidelines are intended to assist parties in understanding the LTB’s usual interpretation of the law, to provide guidance to members and promote consistency in decision-making. However, a member is not required to follow a Guideline and may make a different decision depending on the facts of the case.

Interpretation Guideline 22, and all LTB guidelines, can be found on our Rules, Practice Direction, Guidelines webpage.

Request to Shorten Time 

The LTB’s Request to Extend or Shorten Time form and accompanying instructions have been updated to make clearer the criteria adjudicators consider when deciding these requests.

The Request to Extend or Shorten Time form and instructions can be found on our Forms webpage.

Thank you for your ongoing engagement with the LTB. These changes are a result of the many discussions that we have had with stakeholders about improving the user experience for LTB parties.

Karen Restoule                    Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar

The Ontario Landlords Association is the Recognized Voice For Residential Landlords in Ontario

 

“The Ministry greatly values the role the Ontario Landlords Association and its members play in providing quality, affordable rental housing in Ontario and recognizes the OLA provides an important voice for small private residential landlords.”

Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing

 

Important Information For Small Landlords: Expedited Enforcement of Eviction Orders

April 8, 2021

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

 RE:                 Expedited Enforcement of Eviction Orders

On April 8, 2021, the Government of Ontario issued Ontario Regulation 266/21 made under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act.

This regulation states that the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) cannot enforce any Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) eviction order unless the order asks the Sheriff to expedite the enforcement. 

The Sheriff can resume enforcing all eviction orders after the Government of Ontario removes the regulation.

The LTB is continuing to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

The purpose of this memo is to provide information on when an eviction order issued by the LTB may include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement.

Section 84 of the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (“RTA”) says that the LTB must include such a request to the Sheriff in the order where the tenant is being evicted for certain types of very serious conduct, and the adjudicator has not delayed the enforcement date pursuant to section 83(1)(b) of the RTA. The grounds for eviction in section 84 are:

  • Willfully damaging the rental unit
  • Using the unit in a way which is inconsistent with residential use and caused, or is likely to cause, significant damage
  • Committing an illegal act in the unit involving the production or trafficking of illegal drugs
  • Seriously impairing someone’s safety
  • Substantially interfering with the landlord’s reasonable enjoyment – in cases where the landlord and tenant live in the same building and the building has three or fewer residential units

If a landlord believes that an eviction order should include a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement, but the application is not based on any of the grounds contained in section 84 of the RTA, the landlord may raise this issue during the hearing.

The adjudicator may consider whether the tenant is responsible for an urgent problem such as a serious and ongoing health or safety issue at the residential complex or a serious illegal act that occurred at the residential complex. The tenant will have the opportunity to make submissions on this issue if they are at the hearing.

If the hearing for the landlord’s eviction application has already been completed but the order has not been issued, the landlord may contact the LTB to ask the adjudicator who held the hearing to consider adding to the order a request to the Sheriff to expedite enforcement of eviction. Landlords can submit a request to expedite enforcement of the eviction by fax, mail or email. The tenant will have an opportunity to make submissions on this issue.

Eviction orders that have already been issued can only be changed if the order contains a serious error or a clerical mistake. If a landlord believes that an order contains a serious error, the landlord may file a request to review the order. If the landlord believes that the order contains a clerical mistake, the landlord may file a request to amend the order. More information on this process is available on the Application and Hearing Process page of our website.

We remain committed to updating you about operational planning and we are appreciative of your patience and cooperation as we continue to adjust our operations in response to the ongoing pandemic. For new information check out this site for updates.

Sincerely,

[Original signed by]              [Original signed by]

Karen Restoule                    Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar

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Eviction Enforcement Resumes Across Ontario

TO:                Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:          Karen Restoule, Associate Chair

                       Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE:                 Eviction Enforcement Resumes Across Ontario

Today, the Stay-At-Home order was lifted in Toronto, Peel and North Bay public health regions, meaning that the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) may now enforce Landlord and Tenant Board eviction orders everywhere in Ontario.

The government may make further changes to the list of public health unit regions subject to these restrictions in the weeks to come.

Please continue to refer to our website for operational updates. Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Sincerely,

[original signed by]               [original signed by]                          

Karen Restoule                    Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar

The Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) is working towards implementing Zoom’s videoconference platform to conduct proceedings

The Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) is working hard to improve the process for small landlords to have access to justice.

The Ontario Landlords Association has explained to the LTB that most of our thousands of members across Ontario are familiar with Zoom for online meetings and not MS products.

We explained that instead of using Microsoft (MS) products, changing over to Zoom would create a space that most small landlords will be familiar with and be more confident using.

March 5, 2021

TO: Ontario Landlords Association Stakeholders

FROM: Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

RE: Zoom Demonstration

The Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) is working towards implementing Zoom’s videoconference platform to conduct proceedings.

Before implementation, we are engaging with stakeholders to obtain feedback to inform our plans to rollout the platform for all proceedings.

We are pleased to invite you to attend a Zoom demonstration session on one of the following days next week.

Please log into the session using the Zoom link provided next to each date.

Note that each session will be the same and you should only attend
one.

– Wednesday, March 10, 2021 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Please log in using
this Zoom link: https://ca01web.zoom.us/j/64404762691

– Thursday, March 11, 2021 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Please log in using
this Zoom link: https://ca01web.zoom.us/j/67414728067

The LTB values your experience and perspective and we welcome your input on our proposed changes to our processes. We are making this transition to better meet the needs of those who access our services. As we move forward, we will provide more updates in the coming weeks.

We hope you will participate in this session.

Sincerely,

Karen Restoule                         Lynn Dicaire
Associate Chair                         Registrar

Updated Ontario Standard Lease Must Be Used For Tenancies Beginning March 1st

Reminder to landlords in Ontario on March 1st, 2021 we must use the new version of the government lease 

Ontario landlords know that we need to use the Ontario Standard Form Of Lease. Previously, residential landlords were allowed to create their own leases customized for their tenants.

Fortunately, with the government lease landlords can still add important clauses to protect our rental properties.

What’s Different About The Updated Lease?

OLA members have been discussing this on our forum. Some of the changes include things like allowing for the use of electronic signatures and clarifying the penalties for not following the rules and for “bad faith” evictions.

Where Can I Download The New Updated Lease?

Please click this LINK to download the updated lease.

Where Can I Discuss The Updated Lease And How To Add Lease Clauses?

Join our busy Members forum to discuss this and all other questions you have.

The key to being a successful Ontario landlord to to be proactive and solve issues before they become larger problems.

Landlord And Tenant Board Speaks To Ontario Landlords Association Members

February 16, 2021

TO:                Ontario Landlord Association Members

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair

                        Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

 RE:                 Eviction Enforcement Resumes in 27 Ontario Regions

On February 16, 2021, the government announced that residential eviction enforcement will resume in 27 public health unit regions:

  • Niagara Region Public Health
  • Chatham-Kent Public Health
  • City of Hamilton Public Health Services
  • Durham Region Health Department
  • Halton Region Public Health
  • Middlesex-London Health Unit
  • Region of Waterloo Public Health and Emergency Services
  • Simcoe-Muskoka District Health Unit
  • Southwestern Public Health
  • Thunder Bay District Health Unit
  • Wellington-Dufferin Guelph Public Health
  • Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
  • Brant County Health Unit
  • Eastern Ontario Health Unit
  • Haldimand-Norfolk Health Unit
  • Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit
  • Huron Perth Public Health
  • Lambton Public Health
  • Ottawa Public Health
  • Porcupine Health Unit
  • Public Health Sudbury and Districts
  • Algoma Public Health
  • Grey Bruce Health Unit
  • Northwestern Health Unit
  • Peterborough Public Health
  • Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit
  • Timiskaming Health Unit.

The Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) may enforce all Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) eviction orders in these 27 regions and the previously announced three regions that are no longer subject to the Stay-at-Home order. To find out which public health unit your rental unit is located in, enter the postal code in the Ministry of Health’s Public Health Unit Locator.

In all other regions of the province, previously announced restrictions on enforcement of LTB evictions orders by the Sheriff remain in effect. In those regions, the Sheriff cannot enforce an LTB eviction order unless the order asks the Sheriff to expedite the enforcement. If you believe the LTB should request an expedited eviction, please raise the issue at your hearing.

The government may make further changes to the list of public health unit regions subject to these restrictions in the weeks to come.

The LTB continues to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

Please continue to refer to our website for operational updates. Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Sincerely,

[original signed by]               [original signed by]

Karen Restoule                   Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                   Registrar

Eviction Enforcement Resumes

Date:              February 9, 2021

TO:                 Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair and Lynn Dicaire, Registrar 

RE:                 Eviction Enforcement Resumes

On February 8, 2021 the government announced that residential eviction enforcement will resume in three public health unit regions on Wednesday, February 10, 2021:

  • Hastings Prince Edward Public Health
  • Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health
  • Renfrew County and District Health Unit

In these three regions, the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff) may enforce all Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) eviction orders. To find out which public health unit your rental unit is located in, enter the postal code in the Ministry of Health’s Public Health Unit Locator.

In all other regions of the province, previously announced restrictions on enforcement of LTB evictions orders by the Sheriff remain in effect. In those regions, the Sheriff cannot enforce an LTB eviction order unless the order asks the Sheriff to expedite the enforcement. If you believe the LTB should request an expedited eviction, please raise the issue at your hearing.

The government may make further changes to the list of public health unit regions subject to these restrictions in the weeks to come.

The LTB continues to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

Please continue to refer to our website for operational updates. Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Sincerely,

[original signed by]               [original signed by]

Karen Restoule                    Debbie Koukouves, on behalf of Lynn Dicaire

Associate Chair                    Registrar

Landlord and Tenant Board Expanding Access to Technology for Proceedings

January 27, 2021

TO:                  Ontario Landlord Association Stakeholders

FROM:            Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar,  LTB

RE:                  Landlord and Tenant Board Expanding Access

The Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) is continuing its efforts to improve operations and enhance the quality of dispute resolution for the thousands of people across the province who access its services.

Last year, we heard from you that some Ontarians have difficulty participating in their hearing by telephone or videoconference because of a lack of access to the necessary technology. This feedback has been important to helping us identify opportunities to improve parties’ experience with the board. In doing so, we have carefully assessed and evaluated the LTB’s ability to provide access to technology, while also ensuring the safety of LTB staff and participants.

Today, we are pleased to announce that starting February 1, the LTB is expanding options to address requests for alternative hearing formats for parties in Toronto who do not have access to a telephone, computer and/or the internet.

LTB parties who need access to a computer and telephone terminal may be accommodated at the 15 Grosvenor Hearing Centre in Toronto. Parties who have received a Notice of Hearing and have contacted the LTB to make their request will be considered for access to the terminal. The LTB will evaluate each request on a case-by-case basis and respond with its decision to grant or deny the request. If the request is granted, the party using the terminal will participate in their hearing electronically.

A room will be set up to include a computer and telephone to support the party’s participation. Staff will only be available to help applicants who require technical assistance with the computer and/or telephone. A party can bring two additional individuals into the hearing centre for the proceeding. If the party needs to bring additional individuals, they should ask the LTB before the hearing; such requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Tribunals Ontario is committed to safeguarding the health and well-being of staff, and participants, and has implemented safety protocols and enhanced cleaning at the 15 Grosvenor Hearing Centre. Everyone entering the hearing centre will be required to complete an on-site COVID-19 screening assessment before entry and must adhere to all safety measures inside the hearing centre. Individuals who are deemed inadmissible through the screening assessment will not be permitted entry. Front-line counter services remain closed until further notice.

Tribunals Ontario will evaluate this new pilot initiative and determine if and how it may be improved upon and expanded to other tribunals and hearing centres across the province.

We will continue to monitor COVID-19 developments and will update our practices and procedures based on advice from the Ministry of Health, Chief Medical Officer of Health, and public health officials.

The LTB remains committed to updating you with regard to operational planning and is appreciative of your patience and cooperation as we continue to adjust our operations in response to the ongoing pandemic.

Sincerely,

[Original signed by]         [Original signed by]

Karen Restoule

Associate Chair

Lynn Dicaire

Registrar

 

Ontario Residential Evictions Will Not Be Enforced

Small Ontario landlords from all across the province were shocked when news broke that evictions would not be enforced during the latest emergency lock down.

After waiting for months and months, small landlords were happy to find the  Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) finally re-opened and began having video hearings.

Not getting rent created severe financial challenges for thousands of small ‘mom and pop’ landlords all over Ontario.

You Waited For Months, Got The Legal Eviction (Because You Were Right) And Now Tenants Can Still Stay While Not Paying

Many small landlords have had to sell their rental properties or max out their credit cards just to stay solvent. Others trusted the system and held on and got their eviction order in the past couple of months.

Getting An Eviction Order From the LTB Is Step #1

When you get an eviction order and your tenants don’t move landlords must hire (and pay a lot of money to) the Sheriff aka “Court Enforcement Office”.

This is Step #2

The Sheriff has the right to remove tenants who don’t follow the eviction order. They “enforce” the order and make sure justice is served.

Step #2 Has Now Been Stopped In Most Cases

So you waited for months, finally got your LTB Hearing, you won and now you want to take your home back.

Not anymore. Enforcement is now cancelled in most cases (such as non-payment of rent).

These are challenging times and the LTB reached out to the Ontario Landlords Association to explain.

 

January 14, 2021

 TO:                 Ontario Landlords Association Stakeholders

FROM:           Karen Restoule, Associate Chair, Lynn Dicaire, Registrar

 RE:                 Announcement on Temporary Pause Evictions

Today, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing announced a temporary residential evictions moratorium effective January 14, 2021 during the provincial declaration of emergency and while the stay-at-home-order is in force.

At this time, the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) will continue to hold hearings for all types of applications and issue orders, including orders for evictions. This will help ensure that tenants and landlords seeking resolution from the LTB are provided access to justice with minimal service delays.

The LTB will continue to conduct hearings by videoconference, phone or in writing to protect the health and safety of Ontarians.

As set out in regulation, most eviction orders will not be enforced by the Court Enforcement Office (Sheriff’s Office) while in effect.

We continue to encourage landlords and tenants to work together to resolve their disputes during this challenging time.

The LTB is carefully monitoring the situation and operational changes, if any, will be posted to our website.

We are open to and welcome your feedback as we value your perspective on landlord and tenant matters. Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

We remain committed to providing fair, effective and timely access to justice.

Sincerely,

[original signed by]       [original signed by]

Karen Restoule

Associate Chair

Lynn Dicaire

Registrar

Experienced And Professional OLA Members Worry: How Long Will the Emergency Continue And Evictions Not Be Enforced?

We all hope the emergency lock down ends soon. But what if it doesn’t? That will mean small “mom and pop” landlords who provide high quality, affordable housing all over Ontario will suffer.

We are working class people who have invested to create the type of excellent and safe rental properties we always were looking for when we rented.

Allowing non-paying tenants to stay in our homes, or landlords who need to move back to their rental property home to frozen out will be a disaster.

Small landlords are not corporate landlords who have millions of dollars in their vaults and foreign investors to bankroll them.

We are people, who work, follow the system, and want to succeed.

We need to prepare now for an extended lock down to protect small landlords.

Ontario Landlords Association Fire Safety Campaign 2021!

Ontario Landlords Association Fire Safety Campaign Rental Property

Experienced Ontario landlords know safe rentals are key!

Providing safe rental properties is a vital part of your rental property business. Fire departments across Ontario are making sure Fines laid for smoke alarm violations . Sadly there are still horrible stories of  tragic fire related events that could have been avoided.

Safe rentals are also a great way to let all the good tenants out there know you are a responsible and professional landlord who takes being a landlord seriously.  Successful landlords know good tenants want to rent from responsible landlords who rent out safe and well maintained rental housing units.

The Ontario Landlords Association has launched our Fire Safety Campaign for 2021 to make sure residential landlords across the province are aware of their responsibilities for owning rental properties.

(more…)

Ontario Standard Form of Lease – Top 100 Clauses You NEED To Add To Avoid Potential Disaster in 2020!

Protect Your Rental Business By Adding The Top 100 Key Clauses to the Ontario Standard Lease Recommended by Experienced & Success Ontario Landlords & Property Managers. This is “VITAL” for Ontario Landlords in 2020!

We wrote before about the fact that as of April 30th, 2018 Ontario Landlords have to use a government created “Ontario Standard Lease” when you rent to new tenants. The Ontario government created a new lease that landlords much use after tenant activists accused landlords of using illegal clauses in leases and creating a “wild west” environment.
(more…)

Run Credit Checks For Only $9.95/Check (With Scores And No Annual Fees!)

You Can Join the Ontario Landlords Association for a Low One-Time Registration Fee and Start Running Equifax Credit Checks for Only $9.95/Check (No annual fees) To Find Great Tenants! 

With the current crisis going on it’s more important than ever for landlords to carefully screen your tenants. This always includes running a credit check to make sure your potential renters have a history of paying their bills.

When you join our landlord community you get multiple tools for you to succeed during good times and bad. For over a decade the Ontario Landlords Association has been helping small landlords succeed and getting our voice heard at last.

We also want to help tenants and want to have great communication between parties and a “win win” approach. The is why we have our Pay Your Rent Campaign where we encourage tenants to cooperate with their landlord.

Make Sure A Credit Check Is Part Of Your Screening Process

We were the first organization to promote credit checks for small landlords in Canada. We started this over a decade ago! Our partners are very reputable and you can run a check at discounted rates.

There Are Lots Of Great Tenants Out There Looking For a Great Landlord

Make sure running a credit check is part of your screening. And only for discounted prices  with no annual fees or hidden costs!

JOIN THE OLA FOR HUGE DISCOUNTS

How Much Can Ontario Landlords Raise The Rent in 2021?

Ontario Landlords Can Raise The Rent By 0% in 2021 (Rent Freeze!)

Ontario landlords are shocked at the announcement by the Minister of Housing that in 2021 there will be a “rent freeze” and small landlords will not be able to raise the rent at all!

According the Ministry:

Many Of Our Small Landlords Members Are Furious!

In our forums many of our members are furious at this. While our members understand the challenges tenants face, they are not happy to have their challenges put on our backs due to lack of government action:

“Why doesn’t the government just help out tenants instead of pushing their policy failures on the back of small landlords?”

“How about stopping our property taxes for a year? How about capping insurance rates and condo fees?”

“I haven’t raised the rent on my long term tenants for years. But now the idea of not being able to is total overreach and frightening for my business.”

How Did They Come Up With This Figure?

The Ontario annual Rent Increase Guideline has always been based on the Ontario Consumer Price Index (CPI). This is a measure of inflation.

It’s calculated monthly by statistics Canada.

So The CPI Is Zero Percent?

No, the 2021 rent increase guideline of 0%is purely political and breaks the current law!

OLA Member Predicted A Rent Freeze August 12, 2020

An OLA member with contacts in the bureaucracy and in the LTB stated this would happen as a political ploy to appease renters who are not getting the support they need in things such as interest free loans and grants.

How can pay for my increased costs when renters aren’t even paying and I can’t increase rent?

The 2021 Rent Increase Is 0%. It’s Unjust and Unfair

Rents are now frozen.

Small Ontario landlords need to raise rents to continue to maintain our safe and attractive properties. Instead of helping tenants in this crisis, the burden being put on struggling small landlords.

This not only unfair, it’s cruel and we call for a re-examining of this ridiculous policy. If the aim is to get every small landlord/investor to sell their units as soon as they can evict their non-paying tenants, it’s great.

Get ready for the big sell-off

If government policy is to promote more great people investing in rentals across Ontario and creating more high quality, affordable housing, it’s a disaster. 

Saner heads need to prevail.

If not it would seem to many of our members that small landlords are not welcome in the Province of Ontario.

Wasn’t the Ford PC slogan “Make Ontario Open For Business Again”?

Many landlords and investors are feeling betrayed. Feels like Bob Rae 2.0. And we know what happened during the next election for Rae in 1995.

Ontario Landlords Association Partnership With The Toronto Rent Bank To Help Good Tenants And Great Landlords In 2020

Ontario Landlords Association Is All About Helping Good Landlords, Good Tenants & Improving The Ontario Rental Industry

– Spread The News About This Helpful Program For Tenants and Landlords

(more…)

Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board is OPEN!

After A Painfully Long Wait The Landlord & Tenant Board Is Open

Many small landlords have felt incredibly frustrated and rightfully angry as the Landlord and Tenant Board was closed for most cases such as non-payment of rent.

Most of us have full time or part time jobs that help us survive. Like others, we too suffered job losses, no school for our children, lock-downs and were worried about our loved ones being safe.

We also had our rental properties to deal with.

Small Ontario Landlords Finally Can Take Action Against Non-Paying Tenants

Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board Is Open

Here are the rules for the opening.

As of August 1st, 2020 the Landlord and Tenant Board Will:

(1) Begin to issue eviction orders that are already pending

(2) The LTB will begin to issue consent eviction orders that are based on tenants and landlords deciding to settle issues with an agreement.

(3) LTB will remain hearing ‘urgent’ matters that are related to health and safety issues that have already been scheduled.

(4) Begin to schedule hearings for non-urgent evictions.

(5) Start non-urgent hearings starting in the middle of August and into autumn.

As the LTB gradually re-opens it says it will make their services stronger:

(1) They will begin holding hearings by phone, video software and in writing

(2) The LTB is encouraging tenants and landlords to try to reach a settlement before applying for a hearing

(3) Using what are called “Case Management Hearings” for applications that don’t include rent owed

(4) Hiring and training more adjudicators

We will be watching what happens and encourage our members to share your feedback with us that we will share with the LTB and the Ministry.

Got Questions? Need Help?

With all the changes happening and after months of chaos we are here to help.

We have thousands of members and many very experienced and successful. This is why we exist…to help small landlords and get our message heard.

So instead of just complaining to each other about how unfair things are, or listening to people who aren’t successful, our members work to come up with winning landlord solutions.

And unlike people who don’t even own rental properties, we’ve got ‘skin in the game’ and find real world solutions because our incomes depend on it.

All for a one time registration fee that includes huge discounts on key services.

The Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board is Finally Re-Opening!

Make Sure You Know The Ropes And Run A Successful Rental Business By Running Credit Checks, Criminal Checks and Having A Network Of Successful Landlords On “Your Team”!

Ontario Landlord Tenant Criminal Checks – Take Your Tenant Screening System To the Next Level!

Ontario landlords criminal checks

With So Many Problems From A Small Group of Bad Tenants Out There More Landlords Are Using Criminal Checks to Protect Their Rental Properties…And Now You Can Too For a Discounted Price!

Ontario landlords are excited about how many great tenants are out there.  These are tenants who pay their rent on time and respect both the rental property and their landlord in a mature and professional manner. 

Many Ontario landlords have faced problems with their tenants during the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s now more important than ever to protect yourself and your property!

Take Your Tenant Screening System To A Higher Level (Not Just Credit Checks, Social Media and References)

It’s time to make sure you run criminal background checks on your potential tenants. And you can now do so with our Protection membership.

The Ontario Landlords Association has brought forth a revolution in tenant screening over the past decade. 

Experienced and successful landlords in our community were the ones who educated others on the importance of screening your tenants very carefully.  Before we came along there was very little talk about landlord issues and few Ontario landlords even knew they could run credit checks on tenants (and why they should run them).

With so many good people looking for a place to ‘call home’ and rent from you, it is essential that small landlords avoid the professional tenants out there.

These professional tenants know how to manipulate the system and can lead small landlords to not only sleepless nights, but to financial ruin.

Professional Tenants Hurt Good Tenants, Not Only Their Landlord

These types of people who make leave huge damages and owed rent behind not only hurt the landlord, it hurts good tenants who are looking for a nice rental property. Landlords who face huge financial losses often leave the industry.  Or they will raise rents to help pay for the repair costs.

Sadly, we continue to see some landlords not being careful and being ripped off by these professional tenants.

Windsor Landlords Fed Up With Bad Tenants Now Looking At Criminal Checks As Part Of Their Tenant Screening System

After dealing with unpaid rent, destroyed rental apartments and a long process to even try to get paid money that is owed some Windsor landlords are saying they will make their tenant screening system even tighter. 

According to a CBC report a property manager has had enough of professional tenants causing huge financial hardship on small landlords.

Huge Challenges For Ontario Landlords

Already small landlords aren’t making huge profits and many are just breaking even (and some even cash-flow negative). 

So if you aren’t super careful and rent to a tenant who doesn’t pay rent, causes damages, or causes problems with the landlord or other tenants in the property it can lead to huge headaches.

Tenant Leaves Behind Huge, Expensive Damages

The Windsor property manager said one of the biggest problems he faces it from renters who leave behind huge messes to clean up. 

Tenant Was a Drug Addict, Leaving 200 Syringes In the Rental

When one Windsor tenant moved out he made sure to leave a mess behind.  This time it was more then two hundred syringes all over the floors.

Used syringes

Over 200 hundred syringes were left behind, and it got even worse!

Windsor Landlord Will Now Begin Running Criminal Checks

According to property manager Morawetz after so many tenant problems he wants to “take things a step further.” He says in order to protect rental properties he and lots of other landlords will be “tightening up” their tenant screening criteria “to a level never seen before.” 

Make Sure You Follow The Ontario Human Rights Code On Screening At All Times

According to the CBC news report running criminal record checks in some circumstances may be considered discriminatory….but in other circumstances “it might make sense” The report uses an example where a single mom is wants to rent out a room in her house and making sure all the applicants interested require a criminal check could be reasonable because of concerns for her and her family’s safety. 

And the Human Rights Commission states that: 4.2.9  Criminal or other police record checks, Nothing in section 21(3) of the Code or Regulation 290/98 permits the use of criminal or other police record check in the context of rental housing.

Of course, landlords must get permission before running a criminal check and if you have any questions contact the OHRC to make sure you are doing the right thing.

Ontario landlords criminal check on tenants

Ontario Landlords Can Now Begin Running Premium Criminal Checks on Tenants

Join our community and get the tools you need to succeed.  This now includes CRIMINAL CHECKS at a great low price with our ONTARIO LANDLORD PROTECTION MEMBERSHIP.

We Are Proud To Be Partners With TRITON

Triton is the leading background company in Canada.

Regular criminal check price: $59.00/check + $75.00 set up charge

Ontario Landlord Member Price: $24.95 and no set up charge

And it’s all for only a one time fee (no annual fee). We landlords just like you and we know how tight the budgets are for many Ontario Landlords and this is why we want to keep your costs down for the best services out there.

Ontario Landlord Tenant Criminal Checks – Become a PROTECTION Member And You Can Add Criminal Checks To Your Tenant Screening System For A Huge Discount!

Create your own user feedback survey

ODSP Recipient Tenants Struggling To Survive Pandemic

OLA Member Small Landlords Working Together With Our Tenants In These Challenging Times

Many people mistakenly think all tenants receive CERB (Canada Emergency Response Benefit) equaling $2000.00 per month. This leads some landlords to create their payment plans based on this.

Recently there was an important report on Citynews called “ODSP recipients struggling to survive pandemic”. This has helped us educate landlords and created a flurry of discussion amongst our members.

-According to the report, tenants on ODSP get less than $1200.00 per month.

-Also, ODSP recipients are not eligible for the CERB ($2000.00/mo) and can be punished with claw-back of benefits if they apply.

-People are being left destitute with less than $50/week to feed themselves.

Let’s Get The Message Out

For over a decade the Ontario Landlords Association has always been about good landlords working together with good tenants for a win-win situation (or survival-survival situations during these challenging times). 

Our members are working class people. These include carpenters, nurses, teachers, entrepreneurs, health care workers, police officers, fire-fighters, plumbers, seniors and others. We have invested to try to create some monthly cash-flow and prepare for their retirement.

Our members don’t live in mansions (and many of our members rent out their basements).

1. Landlords Make Sure You Are Aware Of The Real Challenges Your Tenants Face

Many of our members rent to ODSP recipients. Make sure you are aware of the financial reality your tenants face.

Talk with your tenants, work things out, understand each others concerns.  Create a realistic payment or deferral plan based on real data.

2. The Provincial Government Needs To Help Tenants On ODSP 

The provincial government needs to step up and help out ODSP recipients pay rent.

The Premier and the Minister Of Housing are aware of the challenges small residential landlords and tenants face and already reached out to the federal government (which refused to help).

With rising food and medical costs, tenants on ODSP need help from the province.

Landlords are helping but many small landlords need rent to survive and are struggling as well.

We don’t want to evict anyone (it’s the last resort) and many of us have strong, friendly relationships with our tenants.

We don’t hire property managers or lawyers to intimidate tenants. What we do is call and chat and try to work things out.

3. It’s time for an emergency “rent grant” to all tenants on ODSP or OW from the province

Small landlords aren’t rich and we have limits. We need the province to setp up to the plate.

The logistics of this will not be difficult. The province of British Columbia is already helping all tenants by paying landlords up to $500 per month to help cover tenant rent.

Let’s Stop Evictions…Here’s The Solution

Recipients on ODSP or OW can access a “rent grant” that will cover their rent for the next 6 months (which will be renewed if we are still in lock-down)

This payment will be sent to the landlord directly and the landlord will agree not to file for eviction.

Boom goes the dynamite – most evictions will be cancelled!

4. Let’s Extend This To All Residential Tenants in Ontario

-Want to avoid landlord-tenant conflict?

-Want to make sure their is no tsunami of evictions when the Landlord and Tenant Board eventually opens?

The province can easily step in and help tenants. If the government helps commercial landlords and tenants, why not help residential landlords and tenants?

The Province Needs To Help Tenants And Stop Putting The Financial Burden On Struggling Small Landlords Creating Unnecessary Conflict With Our Tenants

Airlines are getting a bail-out. Commercial landlords are getting a bail out.

What about tenants?

We need government to play a role and stop pitting landlords vs. tenants.

If this is too expensive, make the “Rent Grant” available to only tenants who are on ODSP, OW, rent from small landlords. 

We think this rent grant should go to all tenants but if there are true budget constraints at least help out tenants on ODSP, OW, and tenants who rent from small landlords.

This will make corporate lobbyists angry. But those billion dollar REITS aren’t worried about being able to pay their property taxes in June like many small landlords are.

And while these corporate landlords can spend a lot of money to politicians, they are not the same as hundreds of thousands of voters who thought they were getting a pro-business leadership.

THIS CAN HAPPEN: No Evictions, Small Landlords Secure, Tenants Secure, And We Are A Team During This Pandemic…It’s Easy To Do!

Ontario can lead  the way and be a role-model for the rest of Canada.

If millions of dollars can be invested on widening highways, money can surely be spent on saving the residential rental industry in Ontario.

…and saving hundreds of thousands of working class landlords and tenants from stress, conflict, trial dates, evictions…and worse.

Be Careful – N12 and N13 Forms Are No Longer Valid!

Landlords Alert!

The Notice to Terminate at End of the Term for Landlord’s or Purchaser’s Own Use (N12) and Notice to Terminate at End of the Term for Conversion, Demolition, or Repairs (N13) are temporarily unavailable.
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These forms are being revised in accordance with amendments to the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 made by the Protecting Tenants and Strengthening Community Housing Act, 2020. Previously downloaded versions are no longer valid.
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We have made sure MPPs are aware of how important these forms are for small landlords to run our rental businesses effectively.
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The Ministry of Housing has let us know the updated forms will be available shortly.
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As always, we’ll make sure landlords across Ontario will be contacted when they are available.

Update On The Landlord & Tenant Board

Important Notice For Ontario Landlords

The Landlord and Tenant Board is not accepting in-person submission of documents. To confirm alternative options to submit documents, email LTB@ontario.ca or call 1 888 332-3234 or 416 645-8080. For TTY relay service, dial 1 800 855-0511..

April 16, 2020
ServiceOntario Centres are limiting the intake of Landlord and Tenant Board applications to the following circumstances:

  • the application represents an emergency situation
  • the applicant has no access to a computer
  • the applicant’s only option for payment is by cash, certified cheque, or money order
  • other limitations to applicant’s alternate filing options.

Please visit ServiceOntario Centres for a list of locations that accept applications and documents on behalf of the LTB.

Most LTB applications can be submitted via e-file. If you can’t use e-file, send your application by mail or fax to your LTB regional office.

Landlord Tenant Board In-Person Hearings Suspended

Important News For Landlords: In-Person Hearings Are Cancelled. What About Landlords Who Are Owed Rent Or Need To Evict A Bad Tenant?

According to provincial government, as the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve, Tribunals Ontario is taking action to safeguard the health and well-being of front-line workers and Ontarians, while continuing to ensure access to justice.

Effective today (March 13, 2020), Tribunals Ontario is implementing a new policy to postpone in-person hearings and reschedule to a later date. Where feasible, alternative hearing options such as written and telephone hearings will be considered to minimize disruption to hearings across the organization. In addition, all front-line counter services will be closed as of Monday March 16 until further notice.

Tribunals Ontario will continue to provide accommodation for people who have needs related to any of the grounds listed in the Human Rights Code.

Impacted individuals with upcoming hearing dates will be notified by staff via email to make the necessary arrangements. Parties should contact their tribunal or board for more information on the new policy.

In addition, we are requesting Ontarians to not attend to any tribunal or board location in-person if they have been advised by Public Health, their doctor or the Ministry of Health website to self-isolate due to possible exposure to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Tribunals Ontario is monitoring COVID-19 developments and will update our policy based on advice from the Ministry of Health, Chief Medical Officer of Health and public health officials to protect Ontarians.

For more information contact the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board.

We Want Win-Win Business Relationships With Tenants

A Landlord Reveals Her Goals To Tenants

Dear Tenant,

I am an a person who invested in an Ontario property. This makes me an Ontario “landlord”. The term “landlord” has a lot of negativity. It brings back memories of British Lords with castles and ripping off working class people. 

That’s not me.  I work two jobs and have a mortgage. My one rental property is nicer than my own house I live in. My car has over 200,000 kms on it and is 12 years old.

So please call me an Ontario “housing provider” or an Ontario “resident who wants to be a great owner of a property people rent from me.”

This open letter to you is to share information so that we can be a team.

After all, you need me, and I need you. 

Let’s be partners in this venture, working together for both sides to succeed!

1. I am not getting rich on this venture.

In fact, for the first 12-18 months of me buying this property, I am going to lose money. Even then, this duplex/triplex that you are living in will net me approx $200-$300 per month after all expenses have been paid. Doing the math, I believe that works out to $2,400-$3,600 per year.

At some point in time, I hope that this property gains value, and I can sell it for more that I bought it. It’s a great concept that you could work towards in your lifetime – if you are so inclined.

Until then, you need a place to live, and I need a tenant.

2. Please take care of our property.

It’s your home, but it’s my house.

If I know that you will keep your home in decent condition, I will be much more motivated to ask you to help me pick out a colour next time I paint the walls, or replace the carpet.

Please don’t be a don’t be a bad tenant who thinks I’m some kind of super rich predator sucking you you dry and spending your rent on Ferrari’s and caviar.

3. I promise to respect you and your personal rights.

I will give you all the notice I can before I have to enter your apartment. After all, this is your home, but it’s my house. If I need to replace a toilet, or fix something, I will give you advanced notice.

I hope the respect will be mutual. After all, it’s the little things that count. If we can all get along, we will both enjoy working with each other. I am not here to mess with your life.

4. I was you once, perhaps you will be me one day.

I know what it’s like to rent. I know what it’s like to be a tenant. It’s actually a decent way to live.

I never worried about the roof, the plumbing, needing a new stove, or fridge, or even if the carpet was getting worn down and needed replacing.

I never worried if the city increased utilities, or taxes – I paid a flat rent, which can only increase by a very small amount each year. I let my landlord worry and take care of all of that.

You need me, and I need you. If neither one of us are jerks, this will work out just fine.

Sincerely,

Ms. Ontario Landlord

Discuss this at the Ontario Landlord forums

The Forum That Changed The Industry Is Back Better Than Ever!  As Landlords Face Huge Challenges Experienced and Successful Landlords & Property Managers Are Here To Help You!

-Network With 1000s of Successful Ontario Landlords & Expert Property Managers

-Ask Questions On A Problem and Get Some Guidance From Other Landlords

-Chat With Landlords Who Are Multi-Millionaires due to investing in Ontario rentals

-Chat With Real Landlords, Avoid Paying $1000’s to “landlord reps” Who Charge You With No Guarantees Of Success

It wasn’t that long ago the serious concerns of small landlords went unheard. There was no voice for small landlords. Nothing. No one cared about our concerns.

(more…)

How Much Can Ontario Landlords Raise the Rent in 2020?

2020 Ontario Rent Increase Guideline Is 2.2%

Every year the government of Ontario announces what is called the “Rent Increase Guideline” for the next calendar year.

The Rent Increase Guideline means how much a landlord can increase the rent without having to go to the Landlord and Tenant Board.

(If the you want to raise the rent higher than the guideline you must get approval by the Board to do so.)

How Much Can An Ontario Landlord Raise the Rent in 2020?

Many small residential landlords are facing challenges and need to increase rents to cover their costs.

Today the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing announced the Rent Increase Guideline for next year.

You can raise the rent 2.2% in 2020

The government says this will help landlords keep up with new expenses.  But many landlords say it is unrealistic and unfair. 

How Did They Come Up With This Figure?

The Ontario annual Rent Increase Guideline is based on the Ontario Consumer Price Index (CPI). This is a a measure of inflation. It’s calculated monthly by Statistics Canada.

The CPI is regarded as an objective, reliable measure of inflation. The CPI charts the change in the price of all goods and services in the provincial economy.

However, many landlords want a new formula that better illustrates our true expenses.

How Do I Raise the Rent For My Existing Tenants?

In most cases, the rent for a unit can be increased if at least 12 months have passed since the tenant first moved in, or since his or her last rent increase. The tenant must be given proper written notice of the rent increase at least 90 days before the increase takes effect.

For more information see the Landlord and Tenant Board Website

To discuss this and other issues go to the Ontario Landlord Forum

The Landlord and Tenant Board Is A Nightmare! (Part 1)

The Landlord and Tenant Board Is Unfair, Biased & Unprofessional 

It Needs To Be Replaced With A Better System!

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

For the first two years my venture into becoming a residential landlord had turned out pretty well. I got into the industry because of Scott McgilIvray and his show ‘Income Property’ on HGTV.

Scott is an attractive sales person and made it seem like not only a simple investment, but something I needed to do or I would miss out on a historic opportunity to make money. (more…)

volunteers

 

 

For the Ontario Landlords Association, the announcement of a 2.5 per cent cap is said to be not enough to maintain rental properties and keep tenants safe.

“Successful small landlords know the importance of win-win relationship with our tenants. We do not want to raise rents in an unfair fashion. However, it’s important for us to have a reasonable rent increase guidelines and 2.5 per cent is too low,” it said.

“We believe the cap should be raised to a more reasonable level when inflation is so high.”

Price Index, a monthly measure of inflation, which suggested 5.3 per cent. But the government said the 2.5 per cent cap — it does not apply to vacant units, community housing, long-term care, commercial properties or rental units occupied after Nov. 15, 2018 — stops tenants from experiencing “significant rent increases.”

Miles Slauson, emergency bed worker with The Hope Centre in Welland, said that number, when broken down into living costs, will have a negative impact on people and families trying to survive as utilities bills, food costs and gas prices continue to rise.

For a one-bedroom apartment in Niagara, at an average price of $1,500 a month, tenants will see rent increase to $1,537.50, said Slauson. Over a year, that’s an additional $450.

For a two-bedroom unit at $1,800 a month, the price can climb to $1,845 a month, an added $540 per year.

“It’s not going to help people that are renting,” said Slauson, noting Ontario Works and Ontario Disability Support Program payments have been unchanged for years.

“We are still looking at many different classes of people being priced out of the rental market. We are looking at the next three to five years of having difficult times for people that are low income and working class.”

 

St. Catharines MPP Jennie Stevens said evictions are at “an all-time high,” and families are struggling to find affordable housing. For the province to impose any rent hike “is the last thing, I think, tenants need at this time.”

“The cost of living right now is unrealistic for an average person, or even an average family,” said Stevens. “It’s getting harder and harder and harder for everyone in the Niagara region, in St. Catharines, to live.”

Reiterating the NDP’s stance, Stevens pushed for a rent stabilization law that would ban unlimited increases in between tenants, as well as rent controls on all homes in Ontario.

She also spoke about the need — as did Slauson — for the return of the basic income pilot project, which temporarily gave a fixed income to people with low or no incomes (the provincial government cancelled the program in 2018). Stevens said that additional money would allow residents to “afford their day-to-day living.”

Because as the cost of living increases, the government assistance programs have remained the same.

“They can’t afford these rent hikes. There’s skyrocketing food, there’s medical costs, we’re probably going to see an increase in local transportation. Everything is going up except the guaranteed income,” said Stevens.

https://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/news/niagara-region/2022/07/06/rent-cap-not-going-to-help-niagara-families.html

 

https://www.toronto.ca/community-people/employment-social-support/housing-support/financial-support-for-renters/toronto-rent-bank/