Posts Tagged ‘Ottawa landlord’

Ontario Landlords: Rent Increase Guideline 2014

Wednesday, December 25th, 2013

December 25th, 2013

Ontario landlords Rent Increase Guideline 2014

How Much Can Landlords in Ontario Raise the Rent in 2014?

If you are a landlord in Ontario you face what is called ‘rent control.’

This means in many cases how much you can charge for rent is controlled by the government.

As we wrote in June about how much Ontario landlords can increase the rent in 2014 the government announces a Rent Increase Guideline, usually in the early summer before the coming year.

This is the announcement from the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing informing Ontario landlords rent increases for the next calendar year.

We have had lots of landlords from all over the province asking us to clarify and confirm how much they can raise the rent in 2014 and here is your answer:

HOW MUCH CAN ONTARIO LANDLORDS RAISE THE RENT?

Ontario Landlords Can Raise the Rent 0.8% in 2014

That is the allowable increase according to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing for the province.

Is the Ontario Rent Increase Guideline Too Low?

Many landlords think it is.

After all, landlords still have not been allowed to catch up to the added costs for when the HST was implemented.

Is 0.8% a realistic example of the increased costs Ontario landlords face?

Whether you are a Toronto landlord, invest in Ottawa rentals or have properties in a smaller area and become a Newmarket landlord, many property investors and landlords say no.

Let’s look at some of the increasing costs for  landlords in our province:

1. How about the increased prices of your property taxes?

2. What about increase costs from the people we depend on to maintain our rental units?

3. Many small landlords are facing increases over 5% for services such as water.

I Need To Do Major Improvements on the Property Including a New Roof.

Is There A Way To Increase the Rent More Than 2.5%?

If you want to raise the rent more than the guideline you can apply for what is called an Above Guideline Increase through the Landlord and Tenant Board.

You can apply if the cost of your municipal taxes and charges or your utilities have increased more than the following formula: the rent increase guideline + 50%.

You can apply for increased costs due to capital expenditures or investing in security services.

Are All Residential Landlords Covered By The Rent Increase Guideline?

No, not all.

You do not have to follow the Guideline if your situation in one of the following:

1. The rental was not occupied for any purpose before June 17th, 1998

This means your rental property was built after June 17th, 1998 or you have built a new unit in your property that was never occupied before June 17th, 1998.

2. The rental unit was never previously rented since July 29th, 1975

This means only the owner has lived in the property since the date of July 29th, 1975.

3. No part of the building was occupied for residential purposes before Nov. 1st  1991

This means the property was converted from commercial to residential or was not built or occupied until after November 1st, 1991.

Ontario Landlords and the 2014 Rent Increase Guideline

 For more information see the Landlord and Tenant Board Website

To discuss this and other issues go to the Ontario Landlord Forum

Landlord and Tenant Board News

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

July 1st, 2013

Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board L1 L9

What’s New at the Landlord and Tenant Board? Rule 33 and Revised L1/L9 Information Update Form

In Ontario the Landlord and Tenant Board’s role is to provide information about the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) and to resolve disputes between most residential landlords and tenants. 

Many small residential landlords have experienced frustration when going to the Landlord and Tenant Board. Thousands of emails and thousands of OLA members have made it clear things need to change.

It can be a complicated and intimidating process for small landlords.  It can be especially stressful as tenants in Ontario can get free legal help at Hearings.

With legal reps for landlords charging up to thousands of dollars with no guarantees and often unsatisfactory results, more and more landlords are choosing to represent themselves at the LTB.

We know because the emails keep pouring in regarding landlords who paid thousands and are extremely unhappy!

This is why we are pleased that as part of its ongoing efforts to improve service, the Board has introduced changes to some of its processes and the forms and Rules of Practice that support those processes.

Earlier in 2013 the Board posted draft versions of the revised L1 / L9 Information as of the Hearing Day form and a new Rule, Rule 33 – The L1/L9 Information as of the Hearing Day Form for public review and feedback.

Based on the comments received, the Landlord and Tenant Board has finalized the form, and finalized the Rule.

The good news is the form can now be easily completed online compared to the complications of the previous one.

Click here to access the L1 / L9 Information as of the Hearing Day Form.

Click here to access Rule 33 – The L1 / L9 Information as of the Hearing Day Form.

Make Your Voice Heard

The Landlord and Tenant Board says they thank everyone who provided comments on the L1/L9 process and the update form.

We know many of our members participated in providing these comments.

The result – a better system that particularly helps small landlords new to the process.

Let’s keep making sure our voices are heard.

The people who run the system need to know the challenges small residential landlords face. We have a new Premier who has proven she listens and invites us to talk more.

Let’s keep communicating our message and change the system to encourage more investment in safe and affordable rental housing in Ontario.

Whether your are a landlord in Barrie, Toronto, Ottawa or anywhere in Ontario let’s continue to let people know it’s important to support small landlords who risk a lot to provide safe and affordable rental housing all over Ontario!