Posts Tagged ‘landlord solutions’

Uh Oh! The Sheriff Is A Comin’!

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

What Can you Do If your Tenants Refuse to Leave?

May 1st, 2011

It sounds a little “wild, wild, west, doesn’t it?  Your problem tenants are finally going to leave…because the Landlord and Tenant Board directed them to do so. What do you do if they are directed to move out, and don’t?   Cue the music, kick the tumbleweed. It’s time for the Sheriff. (more…)

The eviction process in Ontario

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

(COURTESY OF YOUR LIBERAL GOVERNMENT)

May 2011 – Evictions, Landlord and Tenant Board

 

This is a true story of a straight forward eviction matter, that has officially qualified for the “nightmare” status we assign to our most memorable cases. (more…)

I think my tenant is committing OW / ODSP fraud – Who do I call?

Thursday, February 10th, 2011

Who Do I call if I think my tenant is committing Welfare Fraud?

The Welfare Fraud Hot Line number is available for the public to report suspected cases of Ontario Works or Ontario Disability Support Program fraud.

Callers can remain anonymous.

Callers will be asked for the name and address and, if possible, the phone number of the person who may be cheating. Suspected cases may be reported by telephoning 1.800.394.7867

Rental Application, Guarantor Form, Notice of Intent to Enter…all updated documents for 2011!

Saturday, January 22nd, 2011


1. 2011 Rental Application

2. 2011 Guarantor Form

3. 2011 Notice of Intent to Enter

 

Ontario’s landlord and tenant process is broken

Saturday, December 4th, 2010

Ottawa Citizen November 22, 2010

Re: The Shame Of St. Patrick St., Nov. 14.

I am the owner of Landlord Legal, a small firm in Barrie, working to keep up with landlords in need.

Thank you for your efforts in exposing the reality of the eviction process.

So often, landlords bring these applications to the Landlord and Tenant Board and lack witnesses because of fear of retaliation. Police can’t assist in matters that are still “open investigations.”

Lacking witnesses and police records, the applications fail, or we must instead find other, safer applications to the board such as rent arrears or damages to the unit, instead of the biggest reason: the rental unit is a crack house, and other tenants are disrupted and endangered.

It is incredibly difficult to terminate tenancies in this province. The Landlord is held to an onerous burden of proof. The tenant is often enabled and in fact encouraged to drag things out.

These stories are taking place all over Ontario, every day. The Landlord and Tenant Board is profiting from the misfortune of the residential landlord, and turns a blind eye to repeat offender tenants, who make a mockery of the process.

Right out of the gate, the landlord loses. It costs $170 to bring a tenant to the board, while tenants pay $45 to bring a landlord to the board.

Affordable housing in this province will continue to decline as private residential landlords realize they have bitten off more than they intended to chew.

C. April Stewart, Landlord Legal