Posts Tagged ‘Landlord news’

Landlord Advocacy- Mississauga Landlords No Longer Need To Get A License

Sunday, June 26th, 2016

OLA positive change

Mississauga Landlords No Longer Need To Get a License (You Still Need To Make Sure Your Rental Property is Registered, and Safe and Secure For Tenants)

When the City of Mississauga announced a plan to license landlords, it led to a lot of concerns from our Mississauga landlord members and a ton of posts in our Members Forum.

Many Mississauga landlords were confused about how the program would be run.

Others were concerned about what would happen to their current tenants in their unlicensed units.

Many more told us they were worried the extra costs involved would lead them to have to give up being a small residential landlord.

As we represent thousands of small residential landlords across Ontario our expert team was quick to act. We began looking into the issue carefully and contacting people in the City government to get answers.

We then helped inform landlords what the rules and laws are for Mississauga landlords to operate a rental property and publicized the issue and lobbied for landlord rights.

We would like to point out the people we spoke with at the City of Mississauga were extremely professional and helpful and were a great resource for us to get the city’s message out to landlords and residential rental property investors.

The Ontario Landlords Association Doesn’t Believe Licensing Landlords Is The Answer

We are a group made up of hard working small residential landlords. We appreciate and agree with the goals of governments and tenant activists to ‘protect tenants.’

After all, as small business people most of the people in the OLA have rented before (and some of us had to deal with unprofessional landlords!) and have friends and relatives who rent  now.

We understand the need the for safe, high quality and affordable housing.

Based on our experiences as small landlords, we feel that the costs involved with landlord licensing makes other options (such as landlord education and well-trained By-law officers) more effective ways to protect tenants while also recognizing the hard work and investment of all the good landlords out there.

Due to the high costs of getting a license we had many Mississauga landlords tell us they were selling and other planned to invest in other areas where there were no licensing schemes, such as investing in cities as Ottawa or Newmarket.

The Ontario Landlords Association has been a reasonable, yet firm and strong voice, for small landlords and against expensive landlord licensing schemes that will only raise rents on tenants and drive good people out of the rental providing industry.

Mississauga Landlords Are No Longer Required to Get a Landlord License

This has been huge news and the response from our Mississauga landlord members has been overwhelming!

To help clear up the issue and education landlords we interviewed Mickey Frost, the Director of Enforcement for Bylaws in the City of Mississauga. Mr. Frost has been incredibly helpful over the years and we thank him. Mr. Frost is a true professional.

1. What is the current situation regarding the Second Unit Licensing By-law?

The City has repealed the current licensing process and will now require that houses containing a second unit be registered. As part of the registration process, the City of Mississauga requires that houses containing a second unit comply with the Ontario Building Code, Ontario Fire Code and Zoning By-law.

Registration is free of charge. Homeowners will no longer need to purchase or renew a license. Existing second unit license holders will be automatically registered.

2. When did these changes happen?

The Second Unit Licensing By-law was repealed by Council on March 30, 2016. The Second Unit Registration By-law was enacted on June 8, 2016.

3. Can landlords who applied previously to get a license get a refund?

Although there is no legal requirement to provide a refund, it was identified that refunds would mitigate some of the inconvenience experienced by property owners who have taken the necessary steps to complete the licensing process within months of the Second Unit Licensing By-law being repealed.

Refunds for the cost of a second unit license were provided to license holders, as approved by City Council.

Property owners that have submitted an initial application or renewal application in 2016 will be provided with a full refund and property owners whose application was process between September 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 will be provided with a partial refund representing 50% of the cost of a license.

Refunds have been dispersed to all eligible applicants that paid by debit, cash or cheque. All eligible applicants that paid by credit card have been contacted and advised to obtain their refund in person at our Compliance and Licensing Enforcement office.

4. Are there any plans for more changes to the Second Unit Licensing By-law in the near future?

The City has repealed the Second Unit Licensing By-law. A Registration By-law was passed by City Council on June 8, 2016, which requires that houses containing a second unit comply with the Ontario Building Code, Ontario Fire Code and Zoning By-law. There are no further changes proposed at this time.

5. Where can residential landlords get more information on developments on the Second Unit Licensing By-law?

Further information is available on the Second Units website at http://www.mississauga.ca/portal/residents/housingchoicessecondunits. For further information on the Second Unit Registration process, please contact the Citizen Contact Centre by dialing 3-1-1.

Mississauga Landlords Are No Longer Required To Get a Landlord License

This is great news for all the landlords who voiced their concerns to us. Make sure you register your second unit according to the new By-law.

Ontario Landlord Advocacy

This is also an important lesson for good small landlords who want to help create a fair playing field for landlords and tenants. Make sure your voice is heard in a positive and constructive manner and change can happen.

Mississauga Landlords – Tenant Human Rights Matter Settled

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

April 2nd, 2013

Toronto tenant human rights landlord ontario

Successful Landlords Know It’s Important to Know and Follow the Laws and Rules for Running A Rental Business in Ontario

In a February homepage story, the OLA reported on a story of a newcomer to Canada who filed a human rights complaint against a landlord in Mississauga, Ontario.

Rafiqul Islam told the OHRC he wanted to rent from rental property from a landlord in Mississauga, Ontario. He said the Mississauga landlord demanded Islam pay a full year of rent in order to be accepted in to the property.

This is against the Human Rights Commission of Ontario rules.

After seeing an advertisement outside an apartment building at 2365 Confederation Parkway in Mississauga, Islam said he applied for a bachelor apartment and paid a deposit for first and last month’s rent. He used his brother as a co-signer. This was on November 5th, 2010.

Ten days later Islam was told he would have to pay not just ‘first and last’ but the full year of rent. This led Islam to file and human rights complaint. It’s clear the company didn’t know or adhere to the rules which is why it’s important to hire property management companies that do.

In March the human rights complaint was settled.

The owner of the property, Helrit Investments Inc. and Trevi Construction Limited said they regretted what happened.

Helrit Investments Inc. spokesperson Dina Krznaric said her company never had any policy that would lead to newcomers to Canada having to pay one year of rent up front which would contravene the Ontario Human Rights Code.

She continued by stating “Discriminating against people as they are starting to build a new life in this country is most certainly not something our company promotes.”

She also said her company is welcoming to tenants from all over and understands newcomers are protected by the Human Rights Code. Helti would make sure all their employees understand the Human Rights Code and this type of situation would not happen again.

Bruce Best was Islam’s lawyer from the Human Rights Legal Support Centre.  Best stated,While we appreciate Helrit’s cooperation, this remains a wide-spread practice in Ontario and one that must be addressed in a larger way.”

The Ontario Landlords Association agrees with Mr. Best.  It’s important for landlords to know laws and rules to run a rental business in Ontario.Knowledge is power and it adds us to a successful business.

To discuss this and other Ontario Landlord and Tenant issues, come to the largest Landlord Forum in Canada.