Posts Tagged ‘Landlord and Tenant Board’

A Warning For All Landlords in Ontario

Saturday, May 5th, 2012

May 5th, 2012

Tenant Nina Willis, 48, faces two fraud and two forgery charges in relation to her tenancy at a Toronto landlord’s house.

The Story about the latest “Tenant From Hell” begins

It seem like the beginning of a mystery novel.  Unfortunately it isn’t fiction.  It isn’t a novel.  And it isn’t a mystery.

“Nina Willis seemed like the ideal tenant” says the Toronto Star investigation.

The investigation goes on.

“She was well-spoken and tidy, posing as an employee for a cellphone company with offices in Toronto and Montreal. She came with glowing references.”

Here comes the surprise.

“What landlord Darius Vakili, 63, didn’t know was that the 48-year-old Willis was a tenant from hell, with a track record of bounced cheques and eviction notices.”

The Story Continues, Implicating the System Landlords Face in Ontario

“A Star investigation reveals that the rules governing the provincial Landlord and Tenant Board have allowed people like Willis to flourish. Privacy legislation means her dodgy past as a tenant is kept secret from prospective landlords.”

Thank you Toronto Star

The Ontario Landlords Association would like to thank the Toronto Star for their story on the latest “Tenant From Hell.”

We are an association of small private residential landlords, and while many of us have faced terrible tenant problems due to an unfair Residential Tenancy Act and an unfair Landlord and Tenant Board, facing tenants such as the one in the Toronto Star article is a wake-up call for all of us.

The OLA Speaks Up for Landlords

This story is especially important for the OLA because one of the landlords in the article is a new reader of the OLA.

Furthermore, when we first heard about what was going on, OLA editors worked hard to get the story in the news and get the ball rolling for justice.

The OLA began the push to get her story into the media, resulting in a Toronto Star story on October 18th, 2011.  The Star story was headlined

“A bad tenant cost me $28,000 over 9 months!” and can be found here.

So What Can We Learn From This?

There are lessons we can learn from the Toronto Star story about Nina Willis.  Lessons that landlords can learn, unfiltered by lawyers or paralegals or others who make money representing landlords in need.  If there is no “need” there is no money paid.  Paying out huge legal fees means only more losses for landlords already suffering.

Lesson #1:  The Residential Tenancies Act and the Landlord and Tenant Board Need To Change

We call on the government to have summit of stake holders to re-examine the RTA and take a close look at how the Landlord and Tenant Board  operates and how we must change the RTA and reform the LTB.

Lesson #2: If You are a Landlord In Ontario You Must Be Professional in How you Do Business

Landlords young and old, wherever you are, we advise you to do proper screening to avoid ‘pro tenants’.  The OLA offers a low-cost path to incredible screening tools.

If the landlords in the Toronto Star article were OLA members, and did a credit check costing only $10…they would have avoided their “Tenant From Hell” and the emotional and financial nightmares associated with having such a tenant.


Don’t Raise Landlord and Tenant Board Filing Fees for Landlords!

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

April 13th, 2012

The 2012 Ontario Budget

During his budget, Liberal Finance Minister Dwight Duncan focused on repairing the debt problem the province of Ontario faces. Minister Duncan spoke about full cost recovery from fees charged from programs.

Tenant Activists Support More Fees for Landlords

Leading influential tenant activists have commented on the budget speech and have stated that if we have an austerity budget “everybody has to do their bit…how about landlords?”

Does this Mean More Fees for Small Landlords?

We have also received word, via emails sent in, social media, and posts on the Ontario Landlords Association forums, fees for Landlords to file at the Landlord and Tenant Board may be going up.

Enough is enough

It wasn’t long ago LTB filing fees were $150. They were then raised to $170 with little protest from landlords.

Times have Changed.  We will no longer be silent.

Any increase in LTB filing fees will not go unnoticed and silent as they did before. Already many small private residential landlords are struggling to keep above water with the long and arduous LTB process. Raising filing fees is unacceptable since few landlords can ever collect the fee back, even after winning at the LTB and getting an eviction.

Does the Government Value Small Private Residential Landlords?

If they do, not raising fees is a good first step.  The current rules are  “one size fits all legislation” which lumps small private residential landlords with large corporate landlords.

How Can the Government Promote Savings in the Landlord/Tenant Industry?

Let’s focus on making the eviction process more efficient! Rather than put more fees on Landlords, let’s have a meeting of all stake-holders and help the province save money with a more efficient and productive LTB.

The Landlord Tenant Act Favours Tenants

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

March 16th, 2012


Turner continues to describe situations he has faced as a small unit landlord:

As a small-unit landlord, I have been in similar circumstances. Several years ago I went through the proscribed eviction process for a deadbeat tenant. In the remarkably short time of three months, by the bureaucratic standards of the landlord-tenant board, I was able, with the help of a sheriff, to evict the tenant – but not before they damaged the apartment to the tune of $20,000, not including $4,000 in unpaid rent.

Turner explained landlords are just like small businesses, like any independent store.  Landlords provide living space in exchange for payment.  Landlords pay taxes and even support other local businesses like suppliers…just like other small businesses.

Turner goes on to explain if you go to any store, take an item without paying, the owner will call the police and the thief will be arrested!  This is the same as tenants moving in to a unit and not paying, yet tenants are offered special legal protections no one else gets!

He says the Residential Tenancies Act favors tenants over the landlord by a wide margin.  According to Turner, even if you receive an eviction notice from the Landlord and Tenant Board you still have to pay the Sheriff to enforce it.



My tenant hasn’t paid the rent on the 1st? What do experienced landlords do?

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

December 1st, 2011


It’s the nearing the first of the month.  You have a regular system with your tenant where you call them the day before and prepare a time to pick up the rent at the rental property.

For months, things worked well.   You always meet at the rental property.  Sometimes you set a time for 5 pm.  Sometimes you set a time for 6 pm.  One time you and your tenant were both running late so you set a time to meet at the front door at 7:45 pm!  It’s all good.

This time you call to set up a time to pick up rent and no one answers.

You think “I can’t reach my tenant to set up a time to pick up rent, it’s shouldn’t be a big problem.”

Or is it.  

You call a couple more times and no answer.  You leave a couple voice-mail messages requesting a call back.  


The First of the month comes.  No contact, no replies, no nothing…and no rent!

No rent and you still have to pay your mortgage.  You decide to go visit the property.  You knock on the door, ring the doorbell…no one answers.  You try back a few days later.  You think you see a light on, but still…no one answers.

You read the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board Website and see you can serve a form called an N-4 for non-payment of rent.

Should you fill it out and serve it?  You begin to remember how good your tenant has been for the past six months.  Is this a one off situation? You also begin to read the form N-4 and does it ever look serious and confrontational.  The form N-4 looks to want to create a fight!

You don’t want to fight.  You just want your rent.

So what should you do?  

Experienced landlords discuss this in a great thread at the Ontario Landlords Association advice forums HERE

What would you do?

The eviction process in Ontario

Thursday, April 28th, 2011


May 2011 – Evictions, Landlord and Tenant Board


This is a true story of a straight forward eviction matter, that has officially qualified for the “nightmare” status we assign to our most memorable cases. (more…)