Posts Tagged ‘insurance’

Make Your Voice Heard on the Issue of Legal Marijuana & Rental Properties

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

Ontario Landlords Association Landlord Rights

We Need Your Help For Submissions To the Government On Important Ontario Landlord Issues in 2018!

The legalization of marijuana (we’ll call in marijuana, but some people will use the term ‘weed’ or cannabis) in 2018 is a very important policy with huge potential consequences for all Canadian landlords. For more background on the legalization of marijuana check out this link.

In Ontario cannabis will be available to buy at a soon to be created new provincial retailer that will be managed by the LCBO. The plan is for there to be 150 stores open by the year 2020, starting with approximately 40 stores in July, 2018.

The age limit to be able legally smoke and grow marijuana will be 19 and there will be bans on using it in public places, workplaces and while driving.

Ontario landlords association marijuana

What About the Impact To Ontario Landlords?

While there has been a lot of media talk on the impact legal weed will have on Canadian society, there has been very little on the impact it will have on landlords.

1. Tenants Smoking Marijuana in the Rental Property

Long-term Ontario landlords already know how the issue of tenants simply smoking cigarettes can become complicated and lead to lots of problems.

A Toronto landlord has already told us of the challenges of dealing with one tenant smoking and bothering other tenants and how it led to huge financial losses and several trips to the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board. What happens when tenants begin legally smoking weed?

2. Tenants Will be Able to Grow up to 4 Marijuana Plants in the Rental Property

So our rentals can become grow-ops? This should concern every small landlord in Ontario.

Even Conservative MP Peter Kent agrees as he said that “Having plants in the home is just wacky, it’s just unacceptable, it’s just dangerous for Canadian society.” The new laws will allow tenants to grow up to four plants in the rental. 

And the plants don’t have to be small, they can be up to 1 metre tall in height!

3. Issues with Mold, Smoke and Maintenance Problems

We know how tobacco smoke and pet odours can basically make your property “un-rentable” for new tenants. What happens when the smell of weed is ingrained into the drywall and vents? It can lead to small landlords having to pay thousands of dollars to clean between tenancies and not being to re-rent while the current tenants are still in the unit (but have given notice).

4. Insurance and Mortgage Issues

It’s already difficult to get good insurance coverage for rentals in Ontario.  And mortgages are tougher to get. What happens if you rent to a tenant who starts growing plants?

Where are the Corporate Landlords On This?

Unfortunately the corporate landlords are very quiet on this issue.  Instead they seem to be focusing on the issue of rental control for their buildings…rent control which most small landlords have had to deal with for years. And while we made the issue public there wasn’t a peep from our corporate cousins to help us as we pushed the fact that rent control limits supply.

The reality is small landlords need to face these issues head on by ourselves.

ontario landlords tenants plants marijuana grow op

What Does the Legalization of Marijuana Mean For Small Landlords?

This is a huge issue for small Ontario landlords and we need to make our voices heard. If we have tenants using our rental properties as places to grow marijuana and smoke it as they like it could lead to financial disaster. And the impact on other tenants in multi-unit buildings will be massive, hurting both good tenants and good landlords.

Formal Submissions To Provide A Voice For Ontario Landlords

Let us know your thoughts and concerns as we will make formal submissions to both the provincial and national governments. We already had huge discussions on this topic at the Ontario Landlords Association forum and want you to join in.

Make Your Voice Heard On This Important Issue That Will Have a Dramatic Impact On the Industry

Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at

Hoarders? What can a landlord do?

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

“Our hands are really tied under the Residential Tenancies Act.”

 July 2011

Like a lot of residential property investors in Ontario are doing these days, the Toronto Star asked:  The threat from hoarders is real, but do property managers have the power they need to get access to apartments and protect their tenants? 

According to the Ontario Residential Tenancies Act landlords must seek the permission of their tenants to enter their rental units. Gaining access is often difficult. However, following the terrible fire at 200 Wellesley St. E. last September, the fire marshal’s office is now asking landlords to be vigilant about reducing risk to other tenants from the problems caused by hoarding, and to notify local fire departments if they see instances that are of concern.

What can landlords do?  Two members of the Ontario Landlords Association Andrew Ganguly and April Stewart of Landlord Legal were interviewed to help provide advice and guidance.

Ganguly explained “The problem we have is that our hands are really tied under the Residential Tenancies Act.”

“If I serve the required 24-hour notice to inspect a unit and the tenant refuses entry I’m stuck — the tenant doesn’t have to let me in. It causes a lot of anxiety because you want to keep an eye on it because you know you will be the one to be blamed but you can’t do anything about it.”

Stewart gave background information on Section 15 of the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997 which allows a fire official to enter a premises “without a warrant or other authorization for the purpose of removing or reducing the threat.”

In one of Stewart’s cases, the tenant had piled up so much debris gathered outside and inside the house  the fire department issued such as order.

Stewart explained the landlord had not managed to get the Landlord and Tenant Board to issue an eviction notice. While the fire department is now asking the landlord to get rid of all the debris left by the tenant, the landlord knows that under the law he can’t do so as the tenant was not legally evicted.

Stewart said “Now the landlord is in a bad position, left in limbo with the status of the tenant because the landlord tried previously to get rid of the tenant but didn’t win the eviction case.”

Read more at the Toronto Star.

Discuss the article in the Ontario Landlord Forums.