Archive for the ‘Ontario landlord advocacy’ Category

Landlord & Tenant Board (LTB) Fees Are Going Up in 2017

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

ontario-landlords-association-education-campaign

Ontario Landlords Filing Applications at the LTB Will See Fees Rise in 2017

Experienced Ontario landlords know one of the keys to success in this industry is having strong, mutually respectful relationships with your tenants.

You provide a terrific, safe, fairly priced rental property to your tenants. You are a service-oriented landlord and that means when things need fixing or issues arise, you make it a priority and get things fixed fast. When you fix these issues you cooperate with your tenant to make sure both sides are satisfied with the solution.

Great Tenants

In return your tenants take care of the rental home and pay their rent on time. When they want to move out to buy their own home or move to another area they provide proper notice and allow showings according to the Residential Tenancies Act. When you do the showings the tenants are cooperative and keep the place clean. (Many of our most successful members even have tenants recommend their rentals to new prospective tenants during showings).

It’s a win-win situation and it’s what everyone wants.

In Reality Sometimes Things Go Wrong

It happens.

Let’s face it, the LTB is very busy and this is why it can take such a long time to get a Hearing date.

Some landlords don’t fulfill their responsibilities. Important repairs are neglected and safety issues not taken as seriously as they need to be taken.

Other times your tenants don’t fulfill their end of the deal.

We’ve had landlords write about rent being consistently paid late. Or sometimes they don’t get paid at all by their tenants.  There are even examples of tenants who make big damages to the property beyond normal wear and tear.

One of the most common complaints our members have discussed recently have been from landlords owning multiplex units. They have to deal with tenants arguing with other tenants in the building and get drawn into it.

Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB)

When these type of issues happen landlords and tenants can go to the LTB to try to resolve the issues.

We’ve written before about the Landlord and Tenant Board and the longer you are a landlord the greater the chance that at some point you will need to go to a Hearing.

Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) Application Fees Are Increasing January 16, 2017

There are going to be some higher prices for landlords filing applications beginning on January 16, 2017. There are also going to be some increases for a couple of tenant applications.

The LTB wants it to be known that fees are going up around 10% and haven’t been increased since back in 2009. You can see the new 2017 fees versus the older ones here.

Fee Waivers For Those On a Low Income

If you are on a low income you can make a request for a ‘fee waiver’.  The threshold to get this fee waiver has increased and you can find more information here.

Discounts With E-Filing

Four of the most common landlord and tenant applications can be filed through the LTB e-filing system.  These forms make up about eighty percent of the applications filed. 

These applications are:

(a) Form L1 – Application to Evict a Tenant for Non-Payment of Rent and to Collect the Rent the Tenant Owes

(b) Form L2 – Application to End a Tenancy and Evict a Tenant

(c) Form T2 – Application about Tenant Rights

(d) Form T6 – Tenant Application about Maintenance

Be aware of the discount if you are e-filing one of these.

Landlords and the Landlord Tenant Board 2017

Successful Ontario landlords know the importance of choosing good tenants and developing a mutually respectful relationship. Just as good landlords appreciate good tenants, good tenants also are looking for professional and knowledgeable landlords.

If you do go to the LTB make sure you are aware of the process and that includes knowing how much the fees are.

The Ontario Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) Has Changed

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

ontario-landlords-association-education-campaign

Keeping Ontario Landlords Informed: Tenants who are the victims of sexual and domestic violence can now end their tenancy in 28 days 

Successful Ontario landlords know the importance of following the rules and laws for running a successful rental businesses. We also know to follow the rules you need to be aware of them.

Sometimes that can be a challenge. Most small residential Ontario landlords have full-time jobs.  Our members aren’t large corporations with full-time staff and stocks and bonds.

We have members who are nurses, teachers, Toronto fire-fighters, carpenters, plumbers, professional athletes (including some famous ones), lawyers, doctors, electricians, full time Mums and Dads, receptionists, dentists, and investors who don’t even live in Canada (but have invested a lot of money, hired property managers and created terrific rentals.)

With such busy lives it can be hard to keep track of changes that are important for our professional and service-oriented landlords.

This is another way the OLA helps out because we reach a huge audience of small landlords across Ontario and let them know about important changes. For example, we still have Mississauga landlords thanking us for letting them know about the changes to the landlord licensing system in that city.

At first glance the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) can look very complicated and even intimidating. The reality is the RTA is complicated and can be a bit scary for new landlords (and even for some vets).

Over the years we’ve had thousands of small residential landlords from across the province contact us for help and assistance.

This is one of the reasons why the OLA has been asking the government to improve the Residential Tenancies Act to help small landlords and encourage more investment in rental properties in Ontario.

The RTA Has Changed in 2016

There has been a change in the RTA recently.  It’s a change to help victims of sexual and domestic violence be able to escape bad situations.

Many of our landlord members were tenants at one point in our lives. Or they have relatives or friends who rent now.  They recognize this is a positive changes to help tenants in trouble and our membership agrees with helping tenants who are honestly in abusive and  dangerous situations.

Our members want to rent out high quality, legal rental units, to all the good tenants out there and be great landlords. We encourage rule changes, to help good tenants and to help good landlords.

New Notice Allows Victims of Sexual and Domestic Violence To End Tenancy in 28 Days

There has been a change is section 47.1 of the Residential Tenancies Act. Tenants who are the victims of sexual or domestic violence can now end their tenancy in just 28 days if they think they or a child living with them might be harmed or even injured if they don’t get out of the rental property.

Tenants in this type of situation can give notice at any time during the duration of their tenants.In order to do this the tenant must give the landlord 2 documents.

(a) Tenants Notice to End Tenancy because of Fear of Sexual or Domestic Violence and Abuse (Form N15)

Landlords (and all the tenants who read here) can get more information here.

(b) Tenant’s Statement about Sexual or Domestic Violence and Abuse.

Landlords and tenants can get more information here.

(c) Court Order

Tenants can also give the landlord a copy of the court order. For example, they can give you a copy of a peace bond or a restraining order).

Successful Ontario Landlords Know The Rules and Follow Them

Make sure you are aware and follow the laws and rules for landlords in Ontario. We encourage and welcome changes to help tenants.  We also want to encourage some changes to help all the good landlords in this province.

The OLA is the voice of small residential landlords so if you have any ideas for change to your business and encourage other to invest in rentals in Ontario please let us know and we will present it to the Ministry.

We all have the goal to create rules and procedures that promotes and protects both good tenants and good landlords and improves the residential rental industry in Ontario.

Let’s continue to make positive and important changes to the Residential Tenancies Act and the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board for both tenants and small residential landlords.

Landlord Advocacy- Mississauga Landlords No Longer Need To Get A License

Sunday, June 26th, 2016

OLA positive change

Mississauga Landlords No Longer Need To Get a License (You Still Need To Make Sure Your Rental Property is Registered, and Safe and Secure For Tenants)

When the City of Mississauga announced a plan to license landlords, it led to a lot of concerns from our Mississauga landlord members and a ton of posts in our Members Forum.

Many Mississauga landlords were confused about how the program would be run.

Others were concerned about what would happen to their current tenants in their unlicensed units.

Many more told us they were worried the extra costs involved would lead them to have to give up being a small residential landlord.

As we represent thousands of small residential landlords across Ontario our expert team was quick to act. We began looking into the issue carefully and contacting people in the City government to get answers.

We then helped inform landlords what the rules and laws are for Mississauga landlords to operate a rental property and publicized the issue and lobbied for landlord rights.

We would like to point out the people we spoke with at the City of Mississauga were extremely professional and helpful and were a great resource for us to get the city’s message out to landlords and residential rental property investors.

The Ontario Landlords Association Doesn’t Believe Licensing Landlords Is The Answer

We are a group made up of hard working small residential landlords. We appreciate and agree with the goals of governments and tenant activists to ‘protect tenants.’

After all, as small business people most of the people in the OLA have rented before (and some of us had to deal with unprofessional landlords!) and have friends and relatives who rent  now.

We understand the need the for safe, high quality and affordable housing.

Based on our experiences as small landlords, we feel that the costs involved with landlord licensing makes other options (such as landlord education and well-trained By-law officers) more effective ways to protect tenants while also recognizing the hard work and investment of all the good landlords out there.

Due to the high costs of getting a license we had many Mississauga landlords tell us they were selling and other planned to invest in other areas where there were no licensing schemes, such as investing in cities as Ottawa or Newmarket.

The Ontario Landlords Association has been a reasonable, yet firm and strong voice, for small landlords and against expensive landlord licensing schemes that will only raise rents on tenants and drive good people out of the rental providing industry.

Mississauga Landlords Are No Longer Required to Get a Landlord License

This has been huge news and the response from our Mississauga landlord members has been overwhelming!

To help clear up the issue and education landlords we interviewed Mickey Frost, the Director of Enforcement for Bylaws in the City of Mississauga. Mr. Frost has been incredibly helpful over the years and we thank him. Mr. Frost is a true professional.

1. What is the current situation regarding the Second Unit Licensing By-law?

The City has repealed the current licensing process and will now require that houses containing a second unit be registered. As part of the registration process, the City of Mississauga requires that houses containing a second unit comply with the Ontario Building Code, Ontario Fire Code and Zoning By-law.

Registration is free of charge. Homeowners will no longer need to purchase or renew a license. Existing second unit license holders will be automatically registered.

2. When did these changes happen?

The Second Unit Licensing By-law was repealed by Council on March 30, 2016. The Second Unit Registration By-law was enacted on June 8, 2016.

3. Can landlords who applied previously to get a license get a refund?

Although there is no legal requirement to provide a refund, it was identified that refunds would mitigate some of the inconvenience experienced by property owners who have taken the necessary steps to complete the licensing process within months of the Second Unit Licensing By-law being repealed.

Refunds for the cost of a second unit license were provided to license holders, as approved by City Council.

Property owners that have submitted an initial application or renewal application in 2016 will be provided with a full refund and property owners whose application was process between September 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 will be provided with a partial refund representing 50% of the cost of a license.

Refunds have been dispersed to all eligible applicants that paid by debit, cash or cheque. All eligible applicants that paid by credit card have been contacted and advised to obtain their refund in person at our Compliance and Licensing Enforcement office.

4. Are there any plans for more changes to the Second Unit Licensing By-law in the near future?

The City has repealed the Second Unit Licensing By-law. A Registration By-law was passed by City Council on June 8, 2016, which requires that houses containing a second unit comply with the Ontario Building Code, Ontario Fire Code and Zoning By-law. There are no further changes proposed at this time.

5. Where can residential landlords get more information on developments on the Second Unit Licensing By-law?

Further information is available on the Second Units website at http://www.mississauga.ca/portal/residents/housingchoicessecondunits. For further information on the Second Unit Registration process, please contact the Citizen Contact Centre by dialing 3-1-1.

Mississauga Landlords Are No Longer Required To Get a Landlord License

This is great news for all the landlords who voiced their concerns to us. Make sure you register your second unit according to the new By-law.

Ontario Landlord Advocacy

This is also an important lesson for good small landlords who want to help create a fair playing field for landlords and tenants. Make sure your voice is heard in a positive and constructive manner and change can happen.