Archive for the ‘landlord advocacy’ Category

Mississauga Landlords Make Your Voice Heard – Secondary Unit Strategy Meeting

Monday, February 25th, 2013

February 24th, 2013

Mississauga Landlords Second Unit Implementation Strategy Public Meeting February 25th, 2013

On February 25th, 2013 Mississauga Landlords Can Make Your Voice Heard To Government on Secondary Suites

Mississauga landlords have been in the news recently. This time it’s good news.

-Are you a Mississauga landlord with an existing secondary suite?

-Would you like to add a secondary suite to your house to create a wealth through a rental stream?

-Are you considering buying a rental property with a secondary suite?

You have a chance to to make your voice heard on the Mississauga Secondary Unit Implementation Strategy

The city is having a public meeting on February 25th, 2013.

At this meeting you will have a chance to ask questions about the proposed new policy regarding secondary units. You will also have the opportunity to review the current proposals and provide important feedback to the government.

The Provincial Planning Act requires all Ontario municipalities to have policies regarding second units in homes.

Research Findings in the Report Include the Following Points:
1.There are real benefits of allowing second units 

Adding secondary units can help families pay their mortgage, help seniors remain in homes, and create a living space for relatives.

2. There is a real impact on Mississauga neighbourhoods

Secondary suites can create issues with parking, noise and other issues. This is dangerous because it can easily change the entire character of an existing, successful neighbourhood.

3. There are issues concerning safety

This is a serious concern. There are many current illegal units which do not meet either the Fire Code or the Building Code. Licensing second units can prevent this. Units currently ‘under the radar’ will surface and be required to meet safety requirements.

To view the report on feedback and thoughts on the strategy over 5 workshops held by the city, click here.

For more information contact the City of Mississauga at

300 City Centre Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5B 3C1
Customer Service: Call 3-1-1 (905-615-4311 outside city limits)

Mississauga Landlords Make Sure Your Voice Is Heard! To Discuss This And Other Ontario Landlord Issues Go To The Free Landlord Forum for Ontario Landlords!

Tenant from Hell Launches Appeal to Stop Eviction

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

May 23, 2012

A True “Tenant from Hell”

A couple of weeks ago Star reporter Emily Mathieu wrote an article about a “Tenant from Hell” named Nina Willis.

It really was one of the best mainstream media stories about the rental industry published in years.   Thanks Emily!  You have lots of fans across Ontario!

One of the landlords in the story who had been victimized by Nina Willis  joined the Ontario Landlords Association to receive help.  Virginia received the help she needed and managed to get Willis to move! 

Here’s the scam.  Nina Willis passes herself off as a wonderful tenant, friendly, well-spoken, clean as hell and comes with glowing references, according to her many previous landlords.

Once inside the games begin.  She starts by failing  to pay rent, or pays only portions, and uses board rules that allow her to raise maintenance issues with absolutely no warning to delay the process and appeals her eviction orders.

Nina has duped landlord after landlord into renting to her. The Star found that provincial privacy legislation stopped small landlords from learning that she had a crazy record before at the Landlord and Tenant Board.

It’s Great That Nina is Finally Evicted and Her Last Landlord Can Try to Recover and Re-coup His Losses

Who said she’s been evicted? 

Many small landlords  praise Vincent Ching as one of the most professional and fair adjudicators at the Landlord and Tenant Board.  Last month board adjudicator Ching said he failed to find Willis “credible in any way” and said that if she didn’t pay what she owed by the she would be evicted.

The problem is Mr. Ching’s word is not the final verdict.

You Mean Nina Willis Still Hasn’t Been Evicted?!

She’s still in the rental property of her current landlord.  Can you imagine the stress the landlord feels?

How Did She Manage to Stay?

A tenant from hell (Nina Willis) with a track record of bounced cheques and eviction notices has done it again.  She staved off eviction with an appeal to Divisional Court.  Court records and interviews with past landlords, lawyers and paralegals confirm tenant Nina Willis, 48, has been ordered out of at least six homes since 2005. However, the Landlord and Tenant Board says it cannot release her record of many appearances before the board.

Last week Willis filed a notice of appeal to Divisional Court, announcing she intended to fight the most recent eviction ruling, this one from Landlord and Tenant Board adjudicator Vincent Ching.

By submitting the paperwork Willis’s eviction from a Don Mills home — scheduled for the end of the month — was (Get This!) automatically put on hold.

Willis has been living inside a home in Don Mills since August 2011, failing to pay rent to landlord Darius Vakili for many of those months.

In her court pleadings, Willis is asking for a new hearing, alleging the board ordered her out because of a factual “error” and she didn’t have an “opportunity to participate” in her hearing.

Willis has asked for an opportunity to present “oral evidence” heard at the board. She will have to order a CD of the hearing, which will need to be transcribed by a court reporter.

Once the transcript is ready she will have two months to assemble and file her documents before a date will be set, according to appeal guidelines from Divisional Court.

What Does the Landlord and Tenant Board and the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Have to Say About This?

The Landlord and Tenant Board has declined to comment further on Willis’s case or board procedures.

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing has defined the board as an “independent, quasi-judicial, arm’s-length body that sets its own procedures” and said questions about practices should be directed to it.

Ministry spokesperson Richard Stromberg said in an email that because the appeal was before the courts it would be “inappropriate” to comment.

Is the Ontario System Really This Out of Touch With Reality?  How Can the Landlord Survive Financially?

Sadly, yes.  The entire system governing the Ontario rental industry is broken.  Nina Willis is just one of many tenants who use the current system to punish landlords.

Things Need to Change.  And Fast!

Landlords need access to any previous cases involving tenants.   The Landlord and Tenant Board must become more efficient.  The Residential Tenancy Act needs to change.

It’s very risky to become a landlord in Ontario in 2012.  If you decide to do so, screening is key.  Or invest elsewhere where you you and your investment is appreciated.

Discuss this on the Ontario Landlords Advice forums here.

A Warning For All Landlords in Ontario

Saturday, May 5th, 2012

May 5th, 2012

Tenant Nina Willis, 48, faces two fraud and two forgery charges in relation to her tenancy at a Toronto landlord’s house.

The Story about the latest “Tenant From Hell” begins

It seem like the beginning of a mystery novel.  Unfortunately it isn’t fiction.  It isn’t a novel.  And it isn’t a mystery.

“Nina Willis seemed like the ideal tenant” says the Toronto Star investigation.

The investigation goes on.

“She was well-spoken and tidy, posing as an employee for a cellphone company with offices in Toronto and Montreal. She came with glowing references.”

Here comes the surprise.

“What landlord Darius Vakili, 63, didn’t know was that the 48-year-old Willis was a tenant from hell, with a track record of bounced cheques and eviction notices.”

The Story Continues, Implicating the System Landlords Face in Ontario

“A Star investigation reveals that the rules governing the provincial Landlord and Tenant Board have allowed people like Willis to flourish. Privacy legislation means her dodgy past as a tenant is kept secret from prospective landlords.”

Thank you Toronto Star

The Ontario Landlords Association would like to thank the Toronto Star for their story on the latest “Tenant From Hell.”

We are an association of small private residential landlords, and while many of us have faced terrible tenant problems due to an unfair Residential Tenancy Act and an unfair Landlord and Tenant Board, facing tenants such as the one in the Toronto Star article is a wake-up call for all of us.

The OLA Speaks Up for Landlords

This story is especially important for the OLA because one of the landlords in the article is a new reader of the OLA.

Furthermore, when we first heard about what was going on, OLA editors worked hard to get the story in the news and get the ball rolling for justice.

The OLA began the push to get her story into the media, resulting in a Toronto Star story on October 18th, 2011.  The Star story was headlined

“A bad tenant cost me $28,000 over 9 months!” and can be found here.

So What Can We Learn From This?

There are lessons we can learn from the Toronto Star story about Nina Willis.  Lessons that landlords can learn, unfiltered by lawyers or paralegals or others who make money representing landlords in need.  If there is no “need” there is no money paid.  Paying out huge legal fees means only more losses for landlords already suffering.

Lesson #1:  The Residential Tenancies Act and the Landlord and Tenant Board Need To Change

We call on the government to have summit of stake holders to re-examine the RTA and take a close look at how the Landlord and Tenant Board  operates and how we must change the RTA and reform the LTB.

Lesson #2: If You are a Landlord In Ontario You Must Be Professional in How you Do Business

Landlords young and old, wherever you are, we advise you to do proper screening to avoid ‘pro tenants’.  The OLA offers a low-cost path to incredible screening tools.

If the landlords in the Toronto Star article were OLA members, and did a credit check costing only $10…they would have avoided their “Tenant From Hell” and the emotional and financial nightmares associated with having such a tenant.

 

The Landlord Tenant Act Favours Tenants

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

March 16th, 2012

 

Turner continues to describe situations he has faced as a small unit landlord:

As a small-unit landlord, I have been in similar circumstances. Several years ago I went through the proscribed eviction process for a deadbeat tenant. In the remarkably short time of three months, by the bureaucratic standards of the landlord-tenant board, I was able, with the help of a sheriff, to evict the tenant – but not before they damaged the apartment to the tune of $20,000, not including $4,000 in unpaid rent.

Turner explained landlords are just like small businesses, like any independent store.  Landlords provide living space in exchange for payment.  Landlords pay taxes and even support other local businesses like suppliers…just like other small businesses.

Turner goes on to explain if you go to any store, take an item without paying, the owner will call the police and the thief will be arrested!  This is the same as tenants moving in to a unit and not paying, yet tenants are offered special legal protections no one else gets!

He says the Residential Tenancies Act favors tenants over the landlord by a wide margin.  According to Turner, even if you receive an eviction notice from the Landlord and Tenant Board you still have to pay the Sheriff to enforce it.

 

 

Have Your Say On Bill 19 (Changing the Annual Rent Increase Guideline Formula)

Friday, February 17th, 2012

February 18th, 2012

 

Small Private Landlords Are Encouraged to Make Sure Your Voice Is Heard

The Ministry recommends that upon the resumption of the legislature on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 – the OLA and its members visit the Ontario legislature website at www.ontla.on.ca daily to follow the progress of Bill 19.

Should Bill 19 pass Second Reading and be referred to Standing Committee, the Ministry encourages the OLA and its members to take this opportunity to participate in the legislative process by making a submission to or appear before the Standing Committee.

For more information regarding the Standing Committee process please contact the Committees Branch of the legislature at 416-325-3500.

What is Bill 19?

The Government has introduced proposed legislation to change how landlords can increase the rent.

Bill 19 proposes to amend the Residential Tenancies Act (2006) so “that the annual Rent Increase Guideline be capped at two and one-half percent.”  It would also ensure that “the guideline would never fall below one percent.”

If passed by the legislature during the Spring 2012 legislative session, the revised formula would be used to calculate the Rent Increase Guideline beginning in 2013.

The proposal would also require that the Ministry review the Rent Increase Guideline formula every four years to determine the effectiveness of the new changes as economic conditions evolve.

Fair? Unfair? Make Your Opinion Known

Bill 19 will in all likelihood be referred to Standing Committee.  You can play a role in how policy is shaped by getting your opinions known via submission or showing up in person.

Follow the news about this and other ways our business environment is being shaped in the Ontario Landlord Forums.