Ontario Landlords Association


Welcome to the OLA for Small Business Landlords

The Ontario Landlords Association (OLA) and its sister organization The Canada Landlords Association (CLA) are leading provincial and national organizations for private small residential landlords. We provide a unified voice for private landlords and promote and protect landlord interests to national and local government.

  • Network with top professionals
  • Get advice from experienced landlords
  • Learn how the Landlord and Tenant Board works
  • Meet our recommended partners
  • Take part in landlord activities, social events.
  • A chance to "get involved!"

Toronto Star – Join A Group Such As The Ontario Landlords Association To Avoid Bad Tenants

Toronto Star  Ontario Landlords Use Credit Checks To Avoid Bad Tenants

Toronto Star – “Join a group such as the Ontario Landlords Association  where after becoming a member, you can do a credit check for as low as $10, and use their supporting materials to assist you.”

It’s a situation landlords all over face when renting out a property.

Everyone wants to rent to good tenants who pay the rent on time and respect you and your rental property.

Successful landlords rent to good tenants (and avoid the pro tenants out there who want to rip you off for thousands of dollars!)

This is especially important considering costs for landlords are rising and we can only raise the rent 1.6% in 2015.

Toronto Star Advice For Ontario Landlords 

There is an excellent column for landlords in the Toronto Star called “How Ontario landlords can avoid bad tenants.”

It’s written by Mark Weisleder who writes regularly for The Star.

Mr. Weisleder’s columns are very helpful for real estate investors and landlords and highly recommended.

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The Ontario Landlords Association is the Recognized Voice For Residential Landlords in Ontario

 

“The Ministry greatly values the role the Ontario Landlords Association and its members play in providing quality, affordable rental housing in Ontario and recognizes the OLA provides an important voice for small private residential landlords.”

Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing

 

Ontario Landlords Need To Be Protected – The Current System Just Isn’t Fair!

ola landlords speak out

Ontario Landlords Speak Out and Share Their Concerns and Opinions on the Rental Industry

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.

The Rental Fairness Act Isn’t Fair For Landlords – Ontario Small Landlords Need More Protection

Tens of thousands of small landlords emailed in as part of our drive to create a way for landlords and tenants to communicate with each other to find positive common ground. While there are some unethical landlords out there, by far the vast majority of us try our best to be excellent landlords with attractive, well-maintained rentals.

The vast majority of small Ontario landlords play by the rules and care for our tenants and our properties.

The Ontario Rules Do Not Protect Small Landlords And This Isn’t Fair

One of the most common themes in all the replies was that while landlords want to learn and follow the rules those same rules often don’t adequately protect small landlords.

This means landlords who make sure they do everything according to the Residential Tenancies Act and the Landlord and Tenant Board still find themselves in very difficult situations stemming from bad tenants. These bad situations often mean losing thousands of dollars.

However it also goes beyond just financial losses.

Under the existing system landlords experiencing incredible stress, worry and sleepless nights when they are just using the system in place and following the rules. This isn’t right and this isn’t fair.

Good people making huge investments in our province need to be protected and must not be subjected to tenants who can easily manipulate the rules to cause harm and huge financial losses. Recently there was a good media story of a tenant who created a fake credit report to trick landlords into renting to him. He then ripped off his landlords and also cheated other tenants. He is now wanted by the police.

Let’s Protect Good Tenants, But We Also Need to Protect Good Landlords

Most of our small landlord members were renting themselves not that long ago. We are the working class looking to support our retirements and hopefully get some cash flow as a return on our investments. Many of us rented as students at Ontario universities and colleges and many others rented while beginning their careers.

We support protections for tenants, but we need to also protect good landlords. Currently things are simply not balanced.

What Happened To The Changes To Encourage More People To Invest in Rental Properties?

It was only a year or so ago that that landlords were asked to present needed changes to the Ministry. The request was for current landlords to suggest new policy ideas to help them succeed, and this would in turn encourage more people to become landlords in Ontario.

It was a good idea as with a better, fairer system more people would invest in rental properties and this would lead to more choices for tenants and more affordable rental housing in Ontario.

Our landlord members were not worried about increased competition from new landlords and investors. In fact, they were very enthusiastic and excited about getting changes that are desperately needed to help landlords continue to even run existing rentals. With a better system and more protections, landlords could better deal with bad tenants who abuse the system.

More Protections for Ontario Tenants But What About Fairness for Small Landlords?

When the Rental Fairness Act was announced in April many landlords were excited and expected to hear about new protections for small landlords. An Ottawa landlord organized an online event and many our members networked and watched the news conference on the Premier’s YouTube channel.

After the news conference good Ontario landlords were extremely disappointed, and many were upset.

For while there were many changes designed to help tenants, there was little to help small landlords. No one objected to helping good tenants but wasn’t the goal to encourage more great people to invest and create a lot more amazing rental properties?

A Toronto Landlord asked: “Why are the concerns of small landlords ignored as we are key stake-holders in Ontario and important rental housing providers!?”

Some of the major challenges Ontario landlords are facing include:

Evicting for Smoking

Dealing with tenants who smoke, and have this smoke bother other tenants, has been a problem for many small landlords for years. With new laws regarding marijuana this issue is just going to become larger and we need to find a solution.

Creating a New System to Help Landlords and Tenants with Pets

Our landlord members love pets and many have pets of their own. However, we need a way to make sure tenants take care of their pets and don’t damage the rental property. 

Ontario Landlords Association members suggested we create a voluntary “pet deposit”. Tenants with pets would pay a deposit to protect the small landlord from any damages from the pets (and they do happen). When the tenants move out they will get the deposit back if there aren’t any big damages. If their aren’t any pet damages and the landlord doesn’t give the deposit back the tenant can take pictures, file at the LTB, and get the deposit back.

Making the Rent Increase Guideline More Fair For Service Oriented Small Landlords

With even newer rental properties covered by the rent increase guideline (which is only 1.8% in 2018) we need a way to make sure the guideline covers the true cost increases landlords face.

Making the Landlord and Tenant Board More Efficient and Effective

When landlords have problems with renters in their properties we have to go to the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) to seek justice and fix the problems. While most LTB staff are hard working and professional, the way the LTB is designed needs to be improved.

-We cannot continue to have landlords waiting for weeks or even months to even get a Hearing date.

-We cannot continue to have tenants ‘ambushing’ landlords with maintenance claims at the Hearing.

-We need the Enforcement Office to enforce LTB evictions in a time sensitive way, meaning days not weeks or months 

This is just the start of issues that need to be addressed.

Closing Loopholes Exploited By Bad Tenants

We need to make sure the Landlord and Tenant Board process is fair and end loopholes that delay evictions. Some unethical tenants can delay being evicted for months.

The Rules For Small Landlords Need To Change

Small landlords are not huge corporations, massive REITS with stockholders and millions of dollars available from investors from all over the country and around the world.

Small Ontario landlords are working people who believe in the future of our province and have invested their hard-earned savings into Ontario rentals hoping for a better future. Many landlords are newcomers to Canada who want to run successful rental businesses as part of their contributions to their new country.

Ontario Landlords and Tenants Speak Out: “I Wish The Rental Fairness Act Was Fair For Landlords!”

We have asked many of the landlords who emailed in to expand on their concerns and stories of challenges they have faced owning rental properties in Ontario. We have also asked Ontario tenants who wrote in the same thing and look forward to posting their opinions and ideas.

By working together we can create a better, fairer Ontario rental industry that helps both good landlords and good tenants.

The current system just isn’t fair for small Ontario Landlords and that’s not fair

We need changes to be made to protect small landlords or we will see a big drop in investment and less high quality and affordable rental properties. We aren’t huge corporations who can put up ads near Queen’s Park and hold golf tournaments and invite Brian Mulroney to sip champagne with us…we are too busy working and taking care of our rental properties.

Who are small landlords?

We are teachers, contractors, electricians, firefighters, police officers, nurses, doctors, lawyers, Realtors…we are the people of Ontario. And we have been treated unfairly for too long.

Small landlords need support as we truly are important stake-holders in Ontario and need to be protected as the current system simply isn’t fair.

BC Landlords & Tenants Are Asking For Our Help In Dealing With Pets

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You Can Play An Important Role in Helping Improve the Canadian Rental Industry By Sharing Your Experiences To Help BC Landlords And Tenants Create New Rental Policy On The Pet Issue in British Columbia

As part of our “Let’s Improve the Ontario Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the Ontario Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the Ontario rental industry.  Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at landlordtenantsolutions@groupmail.com In this case let’s help BC Landlords and Tenants!

Let’s Help BC Create Fair Rules for BC Landlords and BC Tenants With Pets

Ontario Landlords know how important it is to work together to come up with ideas and solutions to improve the rental industry. Our members came up with thousands of emails sent in when we made key suggestions to the province on what changes need to be made to improve the Ontario rental industry.

Led by our many experienced and successful landlords we have also come up with thousands of tips and strategies for landlords to succeed. And a key aspect of all the great advice provided to OLA members is how important it is to have a ‘win-win’ business relationship with your tenants.

Experienced landlords know great tenants are looking for great landlords with amazing rental properties. You need to be extremely careful not to rent to bad, unethical tenants who will manipulate the system. These are tenants who will “play games” with you and use the Landlord and Tenant Board to delay evictions.

The good news is the reality is there are lots of great people out there looking to rent a property. These are people who will pay the rent on time, respect the law, and treat you and your rental property with respect.

These great tenants are looking for knowledgeable, professional landlords who not only know the the Landlord and Tenant Board and Residential Tenancy Act, but also are willing to work with their tenant clients for a win-win business relationship!

An Ottawa landlord posted in our members forum:

“A young couple saw my rental and liked it. But they had a bunch of questions for me. The questions where everything to what would happen is something breaks to how to deal with a move out after one year.

I told them I was an OLA member and a professional landlord and answered all their questions clearly based on the law. They were super impressed and decided to rent my condo over the others they saw. They told me “my professionalism made the difference and why they decided to rent my place…because of me!”

By working with your tenants you can create a win-win situation.”

british columbia landlords pets

BC Landlords And Tenants Have Asked For Our Help

These days BC landlords and tenants are having an important debate on dealing with renting to tenants who have pets.

It’s a very important issue out there as the new government is looking at making a lot of big changes in the way the BC rental business is run. Even the media is doing some major reporting on the issue of BC tenants and pets recently.

Let’s Speak Out To Help BC Landlords And Tenants Create New and Fair Rental Policy

Here are some facts about how the “pet situation” is currently in British Columbia:

1. As of now BC Landlords Can Demand “No Pets” to Tenants

While many small landlords will think this make sense it’s important to see the social consequences of this policy.

2. BC Families Forced to “Give Up” Their Pets Who Are Part of Their Family

According to facts provided over 1,700 families who need to rent were forced to give up their pets and companion animals in order to secure a rental property.  It’s a pretty shocking number and it certainly is something that needs to be changed there.

3. Forcing to Abandon a Pet/Family Member Just to Get Accepted For a Rental Isn’t Fair

Many tenants feel landlords need to treat tenants with pets equally with tenants who don’t have pets.

Let’s Help BC Landlords and Tenants Create a Better Rental Industry Based On Your Experiences

BC Landlords and tenants are asking for your help based on your experiences. They want real world advice and not some salaried spokesperson who doesn’t even own rentals speaking down to small landlords.

BC landlords, BC tenants and the provincial government are looking for our feedback to help improve the BC rental industry.

Ontario landlords what are your experiences dealing with tenants with pets?

Many OLA members are pet owners and pet lovers and the current situation in British Columbia needs to change.

However, we advise our BC friends that it’s not as simple as a “make it illegal” for landlords to refuse pets.  It’s complicated and we want to help.

For example what about pet damages?

What if pets bother other tenants?

We want your feedback!

Let’s Help BC Create Fair Rules for BC Landlords and BC Tenants With Pets

There is talk that soon British Columbia landlords will have to follow the Ontario model. In BC some people want a “no pets” policy to be Human Rights Violation and the Residential Tenancy Act to not allow “no pets” policies.

Ontario Landlords know this is a complicated situation and so we ask you to share your thoughts. And sent them soon as new rules and legislation is on the way.

Ontario Landlords – It’s just become more complicated (and expensive) to move into your own rental property

OLA Education campaign 2

Landlord and Tenant Board Update: New requirements for landlords who terminate a tenancy because they want to move in for their “own use.”  Make you are aware of the process and the changes!

Earlier in the year we wrote about new legislation that would lead to a lot of big changes and new rules for Ontario landlords in 2017

One of the immediate changes at the time was regarding rent control.

Previously many rental properties which were built after 1991 were exempt from rent control. This means they didn’t have to follow the rent increase guideline and could raise rents every year in order to cover their costs and maybe even make some cash flow.

After all, running a rental business and being a landlord has risks and often increasing costs. Smart landlords know raising rents is an important part of being successful just as any business owner would make sure their revenues allowed them to continue running their business and not lead to losses and bankruptcy.

With the new policy rental units built after 1991 are now under rent control. This means all the investors and new landlords who bought brand new condo rents along with all the other landlords across Ontario can only raise the rent by 1.8% in 2018.

Terminating a Tenancy For Your Own Personal Use

Another big change happened on September 1st regarding landlords own use of a rental.

With increasing house prices many landlords have children or parents looking for a place to stay in. It’s become popular for landlords to turn their rental property into a place for their kids or parents to make their home.

Many landlords are also downsizing. They bought a rental in years past and rented it out. Now they sold their own home and are looking to move to a smaller property and so want to move in to their rental.

While some in the media want to demonize landlords and claim landlords use the own use provision to “turf out” their tenants, those actually running rental properties in Ontario know it would be foolish to ask a good tenant to leave if there wasn’t a very good reason for it. Needing your property for yourself or your close family is one of those “good reasons.”

Landlords Own Their Rental Property and Have Property Rights….Or Not?

Many new landlords in our community have asked what could possibly be the issue about the owner wanting to move in to their own property? Or have their children or parents (or parents in-law) move in? These new landlords say they are the ones who bought the property. They are on title. They paid for the house and usually have a big mortgage to prove it.

We keep hearing over and over again “It’s my house! I have property rights…to my property.”

In Ontario if your property is rented there is a process you need to go through in order to terminate the tenancy. Fortunately, if you want your property for your own use, or for your kids or parents or parents-in-law you can terminate the tenancy.  It’s just become more complicated and more expensive.

Let’s let the Landlord and Tenant Board explain:

social justice tribunals Ontario

To Ontario Landlords Association:

September 1, 2017

New Requirements for landlords who evict because they would like to move in. 

The Ontario government has introduced new requirements for landlords who would like to evict a tenant so they or someone in their family can live in the unit.

Starting September 1, 2017, the landlord or family member must intend to live in the unit for at least one year. The landlord must also either give the tenant the equivalent of one month’s rent or offer the tenant another unit that the tenant accepts.

Only individual landlords, not corporations, can give notice of termination for this reason

Changes to Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) Forms 

The LTB has updated these four forms to reflect the changes. 

To access these new forms you can click on the following:

LTB Form N12 Notice to End your Tenancy Because the Landlord, a Purchaser or a Family Member Requires the Rental Unit

LTB Form N13 Notice to End your Tenancy Because the Landlord Wants to Demolish the Rental Unit, Repair it or Convert it to Another Use

LTB L2 Application to End a Tenancy and Evict a Tenant

LTB T1 Tenant Application for a Rebate

Being using these new forms immediately.

Make sure you are getting the latest forum by always clearing your browsers cache. Please note that old versions of these forums will not be accepted after Sept. 20th 2017. 

Smart and Successful Landlords Know The Rules

With the rules for landlords getting more complicated, it’s more important than ever for every Ontario residential landlord and investor to make sure you are knowledgeable. Even new rentals are under rent control and even if you need the property for your own use or the want your kids or parents to move in you will have to pay a lot of money to make it happen (as many small landlords don’t have extra units to offer tenants).

It’s also more important than ever to screen your tenants carefully and make sure you know who you are renting to.  There are a lot of great tenants out there.  There are also some tenants who will manipulate the system. We want good landlords and good tenants to join together to create a win-win situation in Ontario.

Be Smart, Be Careful, and Be Successful

Ontario Tenants – Our Landlord Community Wants To Hear From You (And Work Together For Mutual Success!)

ola landlord and tenant win win campaign

Renting Should Be a Win-Win Situation. Ontario Landlords Want to Rent to Good Tenants and Ontario Tenants Want To Find Good Landlords and Great Rental Properties. We Want To Help Make It Happen

With property prices increasing in Ontario over the past few years and rents rising, rental properties (and the landlords and investors who own them) have been in the news a lot recently. 

We have also had the new Rental Fairness Act which makes changes to the Residential Tenancies Act.

Many small landlords were expecting some important changes to balance the playing field. By adding urgently needed protections for small landlords it would keep a lot of good people in the rental industry and encourage more investment, more rentals, and more affordable options for tenants.

Bad Landlord Alert…or not

While the media seems to focus on the “bad landlords out there” the reality is these are rare cases and not representative of the larger Ontario rental market.

There are a lot of great people who are landlords (or want to invest in residential properties) and we need to make sure there is a fair regulatory environment to protect them. These landlords are huge corporations with unlimited resources. 

In reality many landlords are teachers, fire fighters, nurses, doctors, electricians, plumbers, contractors and people working hard for some cash flow and their retirement.

Changes need to be made to protect small landlords

We need to discuss important issues such as allowing damage deposits and pet deposits.  We need a healthy debate on allowing a fixed term lease to really mean the lease actually ends unless renewed by the landlord and the tenant.

It’s important for all stake-holders to make changes in how we can quickly evict tenants who don’t pay or abuse other tenants or their landlord.

Many Ontario Landlords area also greatly concerned about the legalization of marijuana and how this will impact rental properties. Many landlords are gravely concerned this will lead to many tenant vs. tenant challenges.

The Rental Fairness Act Isn’t Very Fair

Instead of dealing with important issues, there were policy changes such as expanding rent control and making it even harder and more expensive for family landlords to get control of their property for their own use. There were also punishing new rules for those who include utilities in the rent.

Alberta landlords are working hard to let the general public know how hard they work and how much they care and it’s time we did the same in Ontario.

Good Landlords Want Good Tenants…And Good Tenants Want To Find Great Landlords and Great Properties

Experienced and successful small Ontario landlords know we are running a business and our tenants are our “clients.”

As we usually own only one or two rental properties we usually do our own tenant screening. This means we are personally involved in the rental process.

Successful small residential landlords also know the key to a profitable rental business means we have to first attract some of the great tenants out there to rent from us, and then we need to work hard to ensure they love renting from us and want to stay. It’s hard work and it’s not easy.

Secrets and Tips From Successful Landlords

We asked our most successful members to share some tips to help other small landlords and investors on how to avoid problems and create a win-win situation between the landlord and your tenants.

(a) Screen your Tenants Yourself

With the excellent tools available landlords can take their business “into their own hands” and make sure they know who they are renting to. Make sure you know the rules and laws. 

For example: Getting a real estate agent friend to run credit checks for you can be illegal and cost your real estate friend their license with Equifax. If you are running credit checks make sure they are legal.

(b) This Is A Hands On Business

Get to know your tenants and get to know your rental property. Make sure you make the place safe and comfortable. 

One of our Ottawa landlords wrote: create a rental property that you would want to live in.

(c) Treat Your Tenants With Respect And Appreciate Them

You provide a terrific, safe, fairly priced rental property to your tenants. You are a service-oriented landlord and that means when things need fixing or issues arise, you make it a priority and get things fixed fast. When you fix these issues you cooperate with your tenant to make sure both sides are satisfied with the solution.

(d) Many Ontario Landlords Were Tenants Not So Long Ago

One OLA member wrote on the Ontario landlords forum:

“I rented for years when I was in university.  My first year was in residence and after dealing with the meal plan and a small room I couldn’t wait to get out and rent a property with my friends.”

“Looking back the experience renting a house wasn’t the best.  The landlord would didn’t ever make repairs.  When the basement flooded we were told just to ‘not go down there’ and the stove only had 2 burners that worked (and the oven was so weak it took what seemed like hours to cook french fries.)”

“Now I’m planning to buy an income property near a university.  Maintenance and dealing fast with any issues will be a priority.  But what else can we do to stand out from the crowd and offer a terrific housing experience for student renters?”

(e) What Would Lead You To Stay At A Rental For A Longer Period of Time?

Many landlords feel stressed out when looking for new tenants.  While there are a lot of great tenants out there, there are also people who know how to play the system and can lead to a lot of financial and emotional stress.

What are Tenants Looking For When Choosing a Rental Property and a Landlord?

Our members usually own one or maybe two properties. They aren’t large, huge corporations that don’t care about individual tenants and don’t care about vacancies.

Ontario Landlords Want To Hear From Ontario Tenants

The media keeps talking about “super high rents” and “bad landlords.”  They fail to differentiate between large corporate landlords and small landlords who are simply trying to run a rental business.

Here are some questions from small landlords to help us improve how we run our rental businesses:

 1. What Do Tenants Want In a Landlord?

2. What Type Of Features Are You Looking For In a Rental Property?

3. What is the Best Way To Advertise To Attract Good Tenants?

4. How Can Service-Oriented, Professional Small Landlords Show You Their Professionalism?

We Welcome Tenant Comments on Ontario Rental Industry

Are you a tenant now?  Are you looking to rent? Let us know your experience and your feelings. 

Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at landlordtenantsolutions@groupmail.com

(Please note you will not receive a reply upon emailing us)

Tell us what is happening and we’ll share it with landlords to help improve the Ontario rental industry!

While recent rules seem create a narrative of “landlords vs. tenants” the reality is good landlords want good tenants and good tenants are looking for professional landlords and great rental properties. Let’s work together to make this happen!

Landlords in Ontario – The Rent Increase Guideline For 2018 is 1.8%

Ontario Landlords Association Membership Rent Increase Guideline for 2018

Our Province Wide Landlord Community Believes the Rent Increase is Too Low and We Need A Better Way to Calculate the Rent Increase Guideline To Help Small Landlords Cover Costs

Every year the Ministry of Housing publishes the Rent Increase Guideline.

Ontario has ‘rent control’ and this guideline informs residential landlords how much they can raise the rent in a given year.

The Ministry comes up with this annual guideline by looking at the Consumer Price Index. This index shows the level of inflation based on prices of such things as groceries and the cost of buying clothes.

How Much Can Ontario Landlords Raise the Rent in 2018?

Based on the Consumer Price Index the Ministry of Housing announced Ontario landlords can raise the rent by a maximum of 1.8% in 2018.

This maximum cap applies if you are going to raise the rent from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018.

How Does The Compare To Previous Years?

Ontario landlords can raise the rent up to 1.5% in 2017.

What If You Need To Raise The Rent At a Higher Rate To Cover Costs?

To do this you will have to go through the Landlord and Tenant Board process.

Many OLA members in the Ontario Landlords Association forum have shared their experiences regarding this process.

While some have succeeded, the consensus is that it is a complicated process and policies don’t have a true understanding of the real life financial challenges small residential landlords face.

What If You Face Higher Utility Costs?

Furthermore, with new rules for Ontario landlords coming this year you cannot apply to raise rents beyond the guideline for skyrocketing utility costs. This is one of the reasons more and more small landlords are not renting out inclusive of utilities.

Aren’t Newer Properties Exempt from Rent Control?

A lot of recent rental stock in Ontario has been created by small landlords investing in newer property such as condos. A common question these days in the Ontario Landlords Association forums is about rent control for new rental properties.

For example an Ottawa landlord wrote: “My rental property was built after 1991. Does this mean I don’t have to follow the government rent increase guideline or not?”

In years past, you were exempted but not anymore.

Previously rent control only covered rental properties that were built prior to November, 1991.  This exemption was a strategic decision made to encourage the creation of new rental buildings in the Ontario.

Things have changed this year with the Rental Fairness Act 2017. These new rules mean rent control has been extended to cover rental properties that were built prior to November, 1991.

The Guideline of 1.8% Is Too Low For Me To Keep Up With My Rising Costs

This is a common statement by OLA members.

The Ontario Landlords Association has lobbied for change in how the annual rent increase guideline is calculated. The guideline needs to put far greater weight on the price increases of good and services that impact small landlords.

After all, it costs money for good landlords to run safe, well-maintained rental properties.

Some OLA members suggest a good solution would be for the Ontario guideline to copy what BC landlords have. In British Columbia the guideline is the rate of inflation based on the consumer price index plus 2% (to account for the extra types of costs landlords have).

Landlords Can Raise The Rent 1.8% in 2018

With the importance of owning safe, well-maintained properties and costs rising it’s important for landlords to raise rents annually. We are faced with a very low cap on how much we can raise rents which creates even greater challenges for landlords.

It’s time for the the rent increase guideline to be changed to meet the real needs of residential landlords and to help us improve the quality of the rental stock in Ontario.

It’s time to stop bashing landlords and start working with us to help improve the entire rental industry. This will benefit both good landlords and good tenants.